Research Uncovered—Good vibrations: digital seismology with mammals, ocean noise, earth’s abyss, Marsquakes, sound, supercomputers and psychology

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What: Good vibrations: digital seismology with mammals, ocean noise, earth’s abyss, Marsquakes, sound, supercomputers and psychology

Who: Tarje Nissen-Meyer

When: 13:00—14:00, Tuesday 13 June 2017

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Registration: required

Seismology, the science of understanding elastic vibrations beneath the surface, is a considerably young discipline. However, it has already contributed to a wide range of research topics such as deciphering the deep Earth’s and Sun’s interior, natural hazard assessment and earthquake physics. Seismic methods also play a pivotal role in nuclear monitoring, hydrocarbon exploration and various forensic tasks.

Digital high-precision instruments and sophisticated computer models nowadays allow us to detect and understand ground vibrations at scales from microcracks to planets, thereby facilitating a seismic shift in the breadth of  applications. In this talk, I will present examples of this fascinating multi-disciplinary diversification such as using seismometers to hunt for extraterrestrial life, detecting remote landslides and glacier dynamics, unraveling vibration noise to infer ocean waves and hurricanes, listening to seismicity and earthquake waves, elephants’ use of seismic communication, simulating waves on supercomputers and conceding our human imprint to assessing our experiment Earth.

Tarje Nissen-Meyer is Associate Professor of Geophysics in the Department of Earth Sciences, and a Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Oxford. He is also an adjunct scientist at Lamont-Doherty Observatory, Columbia University, New York. His research encompasses computational seismology from global to local scales. He is the main author of the axisymmetric spectral-element method AxiSEM which is used by a number of groups around the world. Having moved from ETH Zurich in Sept 2013, he continues to supervise PhD students there, and collaborates with many other groups abroad.

Research Uncovered—OUP’s Interactive Academic Articles


What: OUP’s Interactive Academic Articles

Who: Richard O’Beirne and Martin Hadley

When: 13:00—14:00, Tuesday 6 June 2017

Where: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Registration: required

Access: please meet at 12.55 by the Information Desk in the Weston Library’s Blackwell Hall

As data becomes more integral to research publications, the question of how to display the data obviously but unobtrusively to the reader becomes more difficult. Academic Publishers are looking for technologies that allow them to bridge the data gap between publication and research data deposits easily.

In this presentation, OUP reports on a pilot project with IT Services to convert originally static data visualizations within publications into rich, interactive and explorative tools. The R web framework Shiny was used to allow researchers to develop the interactive tools themselves, negating the need for expensive dedicated web developers, and providing the ability to pull data directly from data repositories such as Figshare.

OUP will continue to build on the lessons learned from this project and hopes to work with more researchers to build interactive data visualizations to accompany their publications.

Richard O’Beirne is the Journals and Digital Strategy Manager (Global Academic Business) at Oxford University Press.

Martin Hadley is an Academic Research Technology Specialist at the University of Oxford’s IT Services.

Image credit: OUP University of Oxford IT Services Live Data Project.

Research Uncovered—The Role of Biographical Data in Digital Scholarship: Reassembling the Digital Self

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What: The Role of Biographical Data in Digital Scholarship: Reassembling the Digital Self

Who: Paul Arthur

When: 13:00—14:00, Monday 12 June 2017

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Registration: required

Biography is only one of many disciplines that have been deeply influenced by advances in digital media and computing, and that have required new theoretical approaches to help understand the changes. Yet the digital revolution has arguably had a more profound effect on biography and life writing than on any other branch of literature, perhaps any branch of the arts. At the intersection of biography and digital humanities, key questions can be posed: In what ways does the Web act to co-shape our identities? Do we know ourselves, each other, or historical actors differently? How permanent are the digital records of lives that are being produced? Do we, or will we soon, remember differently? And, what are the research futures for digital biographical research?

Paul Arthur is Chair in Digital Humanities and Social Sciences and Director of the Centre for Global Issues at Edith Cowan University, Australia. He was previously Professor in Digital Humanities at Western Sydney University. From 2010–2013 he was Deputy Director of the National Centre of Biography at the Australian National University, and Deputy General Editor of the Australian Dictionary of Biography. Recent publications include Migrant Nation (in press, 2017, ed.), Private Lives, Intimate Readings (2015, ed. with Leena Kurvet-Käosaar), and Advancing Digital Humanities: Research, Methods, Theories (2014, ed. with Katherine Bode).

Image credit: https://www.theengineer.co.uk/

Research Uncovered—Safety and Fairness on the Internet

 

 

 

 

What: Safety and Fairness on the Internet

Who: Helena Webb and Menisha Patel

When: 13:00—14:00, Tuesday 23 May 2017

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

The internet is becoming an increasingly dominant feature of social life in the western world. More and more users rely on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google to receive news, communicate with others, share content and conduct everyday tasks. As this reliance grows, it is important to ask questions about how we ensure safety and fairness on the internet. For instance, how can we limit the spread of harmful content such as rumour and hate speech on social media? How can we ensure that the algorithms that filter much of the content we see produce results that are both accurate and unbiased? What can we do to protect vulnerable users online?
 
In this talk we describe two projects that seek to advance safety and fairness online. We report on the findings of the Digital Wildfire project, which investigated opportunities for the responsible governance of social media – in particular looking into how we might prevent and limit the spread of hate speech and rumour online whilst also protecting freedom of speech. We also introduce the UnBias project, which investigates the user experience of algorithm-driven internet services and the processes of algorithm design. This project focuses in particular on the perspectives of young people and involves activities that will 1) support user understanding about online environments, 2) raise awareness among online providers about the concerns and rights of internet users, and 3) generate debate about the ‘fair’ operation of algorithms in modern life.
 
 
Helena Webb is a Senior Researcher in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Oxford. She works as part of the Human Centred Computing Group, which examines the inter-relationships between computing and social practices. She is interested in communication, organisation and the use of technology in everyday work and life. Most recently she has been working on the Digital Wildfire and UnBias projects.
Menisha Patel is a researcher working within the Department of Computer Science at the University of Oxford.  She is part of the Human Centred Computing Group, and her work focuses around both fine-grained and more systemic level social issues surrounding the design, development and integration of technologies into our world. She is interested in how we can use micro-level approaches, informed by ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, to understand and assess the design and use of technologies both in the workplace and also in prototype form.  Her recent work has been within the field of “responsible research and innovation” (RRI), where she has worked on projects concerning how we can integrate more responsible practice into the research and innovation procedures and processes, to engender more socially and ethically desirable innovation.

 

Research Uncovered—Capture, Model, Interpret: new ways of imaging ancient text artefacts

RTI Dome 7. Credit: Custom Imaging; https://custom-imaging.co.uk/projects/dome-7/

What: Capture, Model, Interpret: new ways of imaging ancient text artefacts

Who: Jacob Dahl and Kirk Martinez

When: 13:00—14:00, Tuesday 30 May 2017

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Imaging systems have been developed over the years to capture images of  objects which are more detailed, have accurate colour and have  revolutionised our records of our cultural heritage. Some objects have subtle surface details which are difficult to capture. We have been using a technique called “reflectance transformation imaging”. This allows the viewer to move a virtual light around to highlight the detail of interest. This talk will explain the technique and show the systems we made to capture hundreds of images.

Seal impression on the proto-Elamite tablet Sb 04832 captured from an RTI dome image made in the Louvre. Credit: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative; http://cdli.ucla.edu/P008022.

Jacob Dahl is a specialist of the pre-Classical cultures and languages of the Near East. He has written on early Babylonian socio-economic history, early Near Eastern writing systems, and Sumerian literature. He works on the decipherment of proto-Elamite, the last undeciphered writing system from the ancient Near East with a substantial number of sources (more than 1600 tablets divided between the Louvre Museum and the National Museum of Iran). Initially inspired and influenced by archaic cuneiform from Mesopotamia, proto-Elamite was a very short-lived writing system (ca. 3100 – 2900 BC) used across much of what today constitute the Islamic Republic of Iran.As a co-PI of the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative he seeks to document and safeguard Mesopotamia’s contribution to our shared world history by making its ancient records available freely online.

Kirk Martinez is a Professor of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. His imaging and image processing research includes the VASARI and MARC projects on high resolution colorimetric imaging,  In Viseum a new system was designed to allow web browsers to view high resolution images (which became IIPimage). He founded the VIPS image processing library. He has developed nine RTI imaging systems and is currently collaborating with Jacob Dahl in Oriental Studies on the
imaging of ancient seals.

Yorkshire Sound Women Network on Tour

What: Oxford meet of the Yorkshire Sound Women Network

Who: Amy V Beeston, Liz Dobson, Pip Willcox

When: 18:00—20:00, Thursday 11 May 2017

Where: The Jam Factory (map)

Access: open to women of all ages

Admission: free

Booking: no booking required: just turn up!

We are delighted to welcome two of the leading lights of the Yorkshire Sound Women Network (YSWN), Liz Dobson and Amy Beeston, to Oxford where we will be co-hosting a meet in a cafe—YSWN on tour!

YSWN’s glorious mission is to inspire and enable more women and girls to explore sound and music technology. This first meeting in Oxford marks the start of our own sister network, supported by the Fusing Semantic and Audio Technologies project.

Women and girls of all ages are invited to come together to meet new people and talk about sound and music technology in an informal setting, tea and cake provided!

There is no pressure to share work with the group, but if there is something you would like to bring along for people to look at/listen to you are more than welcome.

 

If you would like to find out more about YSWN, you can join their mailing list through their Facebook page. There is more information about the network  in Sheffield through the Sheffield YSWN Facebook group or Sheffield YSWN Google group. You can also read more about the series of workshops which took place in Sheffield as part of Catalyst:Festival of Creativity.

For more information about this event, please contact pip.willcox@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. For any queries about YSWN’s events please contact yswnsheffield@gmail.com.

We look forward to seeing you on 11 May!

Dr Amy V Beeston

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Sheffield, working in the ‘Speech and Hearing’ and ‘Music Mind Machine’ research groups. I develop tools to extract meaningful data from audio signals, and am particularly interested in using principles of human audition to improve the performance of machine listeners in everyday environments.

Dr Liz Dobson

I am a senior lecturer in music technology at the University of Huddersfield with an OU PhD in education and social psychology. My academic work examines relationships between community, learning and creative practice in music technology, leading me to create informal communities for knowledge sharing.Â

Pip Willcox

I am the Head of the Centre for Digital Scholarship at the Bodleian Libraries, and a Senior Researcher at the University of Oxford e-Research Centre where I work on the EPSRC project, Fusing Semantic and Audio Technologies for Intelligent Music Production and Consumption (EP/L019981/1). I co-direct the Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School and convene its introductory workshop strand. With a background in textual editing and book history, my current work investigates narrative and the intersection between the material and the digital, exploring the experimental humanities.

Ethics and Cybersecurity hackathon

Our colleagues invite applications for a hackathon, 13-14 May 2017.

Ethics and Cybersecurity hackathon – Oxford 13-14 May with Cyber Security Challenge UK

Deadline: 5 May!

Are you interested in the ethical and social effects of technologies? Come to the ethicon event, 13-14 May!

We are very excited to be running a new kind of event here in Oxford. The ‘ethicon’ is a twist on the hackathon. Participants work in teams to design a prototype system to solve a particular challenge. However in addition to thinking through technical details they also need to identify the potential social and ethical effects of the particular technology and find creative ways to address them. To assist with this, participants are put into groups so that students from computer science and social science/humanities/business backgrounds work together and learn from each other. The groups’ ideas are then judged by a panel of experts and prizes are available to the winning teams.

Each team will be made up of two technical undergraduates (from computer science or a related discipline), plus two non-technical team members from areas such as social sciences, philosophy, business (and who have an interest in ethics) from any UK University.  Deadline 5 May.

Details about how you can apply to take part are on their poster and: https://cybersecuritychallenge.org.uk/news-events/part-first-ever-ethicon.

If you have any questions about the event, please email helena.webb@cs.ox.ac.uk.

 

Digitizing The Stage: registration open

Registration is now open for this joint Folger Shakespeare Library and Bodleian Libraries conference!

C. Walter Hodges (1909-2004), “Cutaway view sketch of the Globe Playhouse,” Folger Shakespeare Library Collection.

What: Digitizing the Stage: Rethinking the Early Modern Theatre Archive

When: 10–12 July 2017

Where: Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BG (map)

Access: all are welcome to attend and to submit a proposal for a contribution (see below)

Admission: £150; £100 for students/unwaged/early career researchers (up to 3 years after award of highest degree)

Registration: registration is required

The Bodleian Libraries and the Folger Shakespeare Library will convene a conference from 10-12 July, 2017, on digital explorations of the early modern theatre archive. We are interested in applying approaches from other disciplines, genres, and time periods which can prompt new thinking about the ways we preserve, describe, research, and teach the early modern stage; as well as in hearing from early modernists who engage with their subject through digital means. Seeking to foster a spirit of collaborative experimentation, we invite proposals in the full range of project completion taking the form of 20-minute papers, as well as “lightning talks,” panel discussions, multimedia presentations, and others.

Invested in both material and method, Digitizing the Stage is a singular opportunity to consider the future of the early modern archive. Attendance will be limited to 100 participants, with registration opening shortly.

For more information, please see the conference website.

Digitizing the Stage is organized by the Centre for Digital Scholarship, Bodleian Libraries; the Folger Shakespeare Library; and Professor Tiffany Stern, Royal Holloway, University of London.

Research workshop—Digital Research with OUP Data: a workshop

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What: Digital Research with OUP Data: a workshop

When: 10:00—12:30, Friday 26 May 2017

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all members of the University are welcome

Admission: free

Booking is required

 

Are you interested in working with OUP data?

Oxford University Press is offering members of the University the opportunity to work directly with the data that underpins some of its most popular digital content. The resulting digital research projects will be able to unlock more scholarly potential in these resources, beyond what is available through their current interfaces. The resources involved at this stage are as follows:
  • Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) and American National Biography (ANB)
  • Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and related resources
  • Grove Art and Music
  • Oxford Scholarly Editions Online (OSEO)
This workshop provides a rare opportunity to hear from OUP staff working on these resources and their data, and from academic experts who use them, in a meteor-shower of brief talks. It will include an introduction to digital research, to potential sources of funding to pursue projects, and to relevant issues of intellectual property and terms of use. Break-out groups will give you the opportunity to discuss ideas with OUP and academic experts, and with your peers. A concluding discussion will look towards practical next steps.
Whether your interest is in the content or the technology, and whatever your experience level with digital projects, this workshop will be of interest both for its content and the opportunity to meet potential collaborators from across the University.
Potential uses could involve making OUP data available by for discrete projects, or linking the data to research resources or to University collections. Any project will depend on the availability of collaborative resource from OUP, which may give priority to work in fields of its particular interest. During the workshop there will be the opportunity to discuss and shape project ideas with fellow researchers and colleagues from OUP. As projects born out of the workshop take shape, we will host future events where the ongoing research and its results can be discussed and showcased.
The workshop is free to attend and is organized by TORCH Digital Humanities, the Centre for Digital Scholarship, and Oxford University Press.

Programme

  • 10.00    David De Roure (Oxford e-Research Centre): welcome and introduction from TORCH Digital Humanities and the Centre for Digital Scholarship
  • 10.05    Ruth Langley and Judy Pearsall (OUP): welcome and introduction from Oxford University Press
  • 10.10    Andrew Fairweather-Tall (Humanities Division): Funding
  • 10.15   Session 1: ODNB and ANB: Jo Payne (OUP) with Howard Hotson (History Faculty) and Chris Warren (Carnegie Mellon University)
  • 10.35   Session 2: OED: James McCracken (OUP) with Janet Pierrehumbert (Oxford e-Research Centre)  and Alfie Abdul-Rahman (Oxford e-Research Centre)
  • 10.55   Session 3: Grove: Jo Payne (OUP) with Jonathan Cross and Julia Craig McFeely (Music Faculty)
  • 11.15   Session 4: OSEO: Rupert Mann (OUP) with Miranda Lewis (History Faculty)
  • 11.35   Break-out groups
  • 12.15   General discussion chaired by Pip Willcox (Centre for Digital Scholarship): next steps
  • 12.30   Close
For each of Sessions 1-4 OUP staff will introduce the product and suggest possibilities for research; University staff will then present brief potential case studies.

Research Uncovered—Digitization for Research at the Bodleian: Creating Tools for Active Scholarship

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What: Digitization for Research at the Bodleian: Creating Tools for Active Scholarship

Who: Judith Siefring and Emma Stanford

When: 13:00—14:00, Tuesday 16 May 2017

Where: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking is required

Institutions like the Bodleian Libraries have been digitizing their holdings for decades now. These digitized collections have not always been easy to find or use, but in the last few years the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) has opened up a vast range of possibilities for creators and users of these collections. In theory, researchers can now compare, share, remix and annotate digitized objects from institutions across the world, whether to transcribe marginalia, read a damaged palimpsest, or reconstruct the leaves of a fragmented codex. In practice, however, this nascent technology can be difficult to use.
 
Two recent projects, Digital.Bodleian and the Digital Manuscripts Toolkit, have explored the possibilities of IIIF at the Bodleian, with a focus on creating usable tools for research. Using these projects as a jumping-off point, this talk will serve as an introduction to IIIF through the lens of scholarship. Judith and Emma will provide an overview of currently available
tools, discuss what works and what doesn’t, and share what they’ve learned about facilitating scholarly engagement with digitized materials. The talk will be aimed at researchers and library and museum staff, but all are welcome to attend.

Emma Stanford is the Digital Curator at Bodleian Digital Library Systems and Services (BDLSS). Among other things, she manages Digital.Bodleian and conducts IIIF training workshops in the Centre for Digital Scholarship.

Judith Siefring is the Head of Digital Research at Bodleian Digital Library Systems and Services, where she led the Mellon-funded Digital Manuscripts Toolkit project.

Access: Please meet at 12.55 by the Information Desk in the Weston Library’s Blackwell Hall to be taken to the Centre for Digital Scholarship. If you have a University or Bodleian Reader’s card, you can also get there through the Mackerras Reading Room on the first floor of the Weston Library, around the gallery, having checked any bags into a locker (£1 returnable deposit) before you head upstairs.