Digital Methods—How to make a digital edition: an introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative

Image: James Cummings

Image: James Cummings

By popular demand after the workshop in Michaelmas term, we are delighted to offer another opportunity to learn about digital editing and the Text Encoding Initiative.

a clear overview in a short amount of time—workshop participant, October 2016

Research Technology Consultation, IT Services and the Centre for Digital Scholarship offer a course introducing the Guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative for creating digital texts. The workshop uses materials developed for the Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School.

If you’re interested in learning about markup and encoding digital editions, this course is for you!

“[I particularly enjoyed the] practicality of the workshop, which made us able to use at least a simple TEI architecture straight away—workshop participant, October 2016

What: How to make a digital edition: an introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative

Who: James Cummings and Pip Willcox

When: 09:30–16:30, Thursday 16 and Friday 17 February 2017

Where: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library (map)

Access: open to members of the University of Oxford

Admission: free

Booking is required: to reserve a place on this workshop, please email Pip Willcox, pip.willcox@bodleian.ox.ac.uk

TEI logo

This two-day workshop balances introductory-level lectures with hands-on practical sessions to introduce and survey the recommendations of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) for creation of digital text.

“a great class” —workshop participant, October 2016

You don’t need any previous experience with digital text or markup: we provide introductions to markup, XML, and the infrastructure of the TEI P5 Guidelines. The TEI Guidelines are suitable for encoding any sort of text, in any language or writing system, but examples will mostly been drawn from projects the tutors have worked on.

The workshop covers general metadata, the transcription and description of manuscripts, and metadata concerning the names of people, places, and organizations. This is aimed at beginners, and the workshop alternates between lectures surveying a topic and hands-on practicals giving you a chance to practise what you have learned. There will also be time for discussion of participants’ own projects.

The instructors were both clearly not merely experts, but indeed recognized authorities in the field of TEI. Their level of knowledge was incredibly reassuring and that benefited us as students in innumerable ways.—workshop participant, October 2016

Equipment

Participants are requested to bring a laptop with the latest version of oXygen XML Editor. As a member of the University, using your Single Sign On you can download this software and the required licence free of charge, via IT Services’ Software Registration and Download. If you cannot bring a laptop with you, please let us know before the day.

James Cummings is a Senior Academic Research Technology Specialist for IT Services at the University of Oxford. James is founding Director of the annual Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School and is an elected member (and previously chair) of the TEI Consortium’s Technical Council. His PhD was in Medieval Studies from the University of Leeds and he was Director of Digital Medievalist (2009–2012).

Pip Willcox is the Head of the Centre for Digital Scholarship at the Bodleian Libraries, and a Senior Researcher at the University of Oxford e-Research Centre. With a background in scholarly editing and book history, she has sixteen years’ experience working on TEI-compliant editing projects, including Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership, the Shakespeare Quartos Archive, the Stationers’ Register Online, and the Bodleian First Folio. She serves on the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium Board of Directors and the Advisory Board for Digital Renaissance Editions.

Invitation to the launch of the TORCH Critical Visualization Network

Book free tickets (before 11 December 2016)!

We have the pleasure of announcing the launch of our TORCH Critical Visualization Network.

What: Lunch and lecture

Who: Igea Troiani

When: 13:00–16:00, 13 December 2016

Where: Philosophy Lecture Theatre (2nd floor), Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

Cost: free

Access: open to all

Booking: required before 11 December 2016

Programme

  • 13:00–13:45 Lunch
  • 13:45–14:30 Keynote lecture by Dr Igea Troiani (biography below)
  • 14:30–15:00 Questions, comments, reactions
  • 15:00–15:30 Coffee break
  • 15:30–16:00 Discussion: planning the future of the network

Speaker’s biography 

Igea Troiani (PhD, BArch (Hons), BAppSc) is a trained architect, academic and filmmaker. She has practiced architecture in Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia, in Münster in Germany and is founding member, with Andrew Dawson, of the trans-disciplinary Oxford based practice, Original Field of Architecture (2007+). Her research in architectural humanities explores new modes of architectural scholarship beyond the solely textual. Since 2004 she has written critical theory as short film and documentary film under her production company Caryatid Films. She has given keynote addresses on visual methods of research in architecture and screened her films in Brisbane, London, Sheffield, Bristol and Copenhagen. She is currently editing two books, Visual Research Methods in Architecture and Architecture Filmmaking (Intellect, late 2017). She is founder and editor-in-chief of Architecture and Culture, a journal that opens up a new territory of audio-/visual publication for architectural scholars that values multi-sensorial readings of architectural knowledge. Her current studio-based research on unfinished buildings uses photography and filmmaking as visual research methods to critique the relationship between architectural labour, development and neoliberalism.

We very much look forward to seeing many of you at this event!

—Pip Willcox and SégolèneTarte

Digital Manuscripts at the Bodleian: free event

MS. Kennicott 1

MS. Kennicott 1

On Monday 28 November we will be celebrating two major projects, the Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project and the Digital Manuscripts Toolkit, with an event at the Weston Library. Tickets are free, but please book in advance to reserve a place. The event runs from 11am to 5pm, with a break for lunch, and speakers will include:

  • Nigel Wilson on digitized Greek manuscripts at the Bodleian
  • César Merchán-Hamann on digitized Hebrew manuscripts
  • Paola Manoni from the Vatican Library on their part in the Polonsky Project
  • Judith Siefring on the Digital Manuscripts Toolkit
  • Emma Stanford on IIIF and Digital.Bodleian
  • Rafael Schwemmer on the Bodleian’s IIIF manifest editor
  • and presentations by Oxford scholars on their work with the Digital Manuscripts Toolkit.

Anyone interested in manuscripts, digitization, or learning about new tools for dealing with digitized objects is encouraged to attend.

Book free tickets

Research Uncovered—Sleep No More: Digital Scholarship, Online Learning and Liberal Education in the ‘Post-Digital’ Age

 Book free tickets!

Elliott VisconsiWhat: Sleep No More: Digital Scholarship, Online Learning and Liberal Education in the ‘Post-Digital’ Age

Who: Elliott Visconsi

When: 15.30—16.30, Tuesday 22 November 2016

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre  (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking: registration is required

The norms and principles of liberal education—broadly-based and cross-disciplinary learning meant at its core to cultivate those habits of mind and intellectual dispositions worthy of a free and self-governing citizen—are under pressure in the digital age. The norms and principles of the digital age—access to information, transparency and velocity of worldwide communication, ubiquitous and frictionless authorship, broad democratic participation—are under pressure in the late neoliberal age.

In this talk, Elliott will consider the future of post-secondary education and propose a possible path forward, in which the affordances of digital scholarship and online learning align with and enhance the abiding principles of liberal education as a remedy for the democratic deficits and failed emancipations of the ‘post-digital’ era we inhabit.

Professor Elliott Visconsi is Notre Dame’s Chief Academic Digital Officer in the Provost’s Office, tasked with articulating and leading the University’s digital strategy as well as implementing innovative digital and online strategies on and beyond campus. He teaches and writes about early modern literature from Shakespeare to the end of the 18th century, constitutional law, First Amendment / Freedom of Expression doctrine in the digital age. Elliott is also the co-founder of Luminary Digital Media and the creator of an innovative software framework and authoring environment for teaching and learning with mobile devices.

You can read more about Elliott and his work on his website.

Zegami: Bringing your image collections to life

The Centre for Digital Scholarship is delighted to host Zegami, an Oxford University Innovation spin-out company. We invite you to join us for a demonstration of their technology platform for data discovery, and for refreshments afterwards in the Weston Library’s Visiting Scholars’ Centre.

Logo of Zegami What: Zegami: Bringing your image collections to life!

Who: Samuel Conway and the Zegami team

When: 13.30—14.30, Wednesday 9 November 2016

Where: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library  (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking: registration is required

Zegami screenshot

Samuel Conway writes:

The internet has provided the ultimate platform for museums, art galleries and libraries to showcase their collections to a global audience.  The potential for millions of people to access, discover and enjoy treasured collections calls for a better way to capture, store and make image rich assets available. Providing a user experience that puts them at the heart of their interaction with the content in a way that is valuable to them, is a key measure of success.

Traditional search tools and data base user interfaces are both cumbersome and clumsy.  Zegami is designed to enhance your current image database facility and provides the most intuitive image based visual search tool available.

Zegami screenshot

But it does not stop there, Zegami is more than just an image management tool: its ability to easily search, sort, filter, group, tag and annotate large scale image collections at both the point of entry and viewer engagement stages, sets it apart.  This provides the ideal platform for museums, art galleries and libraries to present their collections to ensure maximum holistic benefit.

Organisations including the Bodleian Libraries and several Oxford University research facilities are already benefiting from the use of the Zegami toolset to bring their collections to life. 

Zegami has enabled us to make our trade cards available, in an exciting, cutting-edge way, to new communities: local and family historians, textile historians, etc.  It is a far cry from searching a library catalogue and clicking on a thumbnail.  We love the way it enables users to refine their results by so many parameters. To be able to search by street within a town, with geomapping is an exciting departure for us and the speed with which the results appear is staggering. I cannot recommend Zegami highly enough as a tool which doesn’t just deliver random images, but finds the very image the user wants in a dynamic way.

—Julie Anne Lambert, Librarian of the Johnson Johnson Collection

Here are some examples of how Zegami has been used by museums and libraries to showcase their collections:

Zegami screenshot

We look forward to showing you the power of Zegami and how it will help everyone get more from your collections. You can test the software yourself, or call or email Samuel (+44 (0)7903 628 633, sconway@zegami.com) to find out more.

Access: If you have a University or Bodleian Reader’s card, you can get to the Centre for Digital Scholarship through the Mackerras Reading Room on the first floor of the Weston Library, around the gallery. If you do not have access to the Weston Library you are more than welcome to attend the talk: please contact Pip Willcox before the event (pip.willcox@bodleian.ox.ac.uk).

Research Uncovered—The visualization of the circulation of books over time and space

 


Cristina DondiWhat: 
The visualization of the circulation of books over time and space: How we got there

Who: Cristina Dondi

When: 13.00—14.00, Tuesday 8 November 2016

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre  (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking: registration is required

Cristina will present 15cV, a powerful tool for the visualization of the movement of 15th-century printed books, from the time and place where they were printed to where they are today, via the many places and people who distributed, purchased, owned, and annotated them over the following 500-year period. Unanswered historical queries on the impact of printing on early modern society can now be addressed for the first time. Cristina will illustrate how the project which is making visualization possible—probably one of the largest collaborative enterprises in the humanities—was set up and keeps growing.

Visualizing the 15th-century booktrade

Cristina Dondi is Oakeshott Senior Research Fellow in the Humanities at Lincoln College, and Secretary of the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL).

She is the Principal Investigator of the 5-year project 15cBOOKTRADE, funded by the European Research Council (ERC), which started in April 2014.

Cristina was one of the editors of the Bodleian catalogue of incunabula, Bod-inc (OUP 2005), and the creator of the international databases Material Evidence in Incunabula (MEI) and TEXT-inc.

Research Uncovered—The Art of Seeing


Chrystalina Antoniades 
What: The Art of Seeing

Who: Chrystalina Antoniades

When: 13.00—14.00, Tuesday 29 November 2016

Where: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library  (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking: registration is required

We might think that we can see everything that is happening around us, and it is often said that ‘seeing is believing’, indicating that visual perception is considered one of the most trustworthy means of obtaining information about what is happening around us. However, research has revealed that perception does not capture as much information about the world as we would think.Even if viewing conditions were excellent, we could still miss important events around us.

In this talk, I will focus on the neuroscientific relationship between visual perception and art and talk about some of the work we have being carrying out in collaboration with the Ashmolean museum.

Professor Chrystalina Antoniades is an Associate Professor at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford and a lecturer in medicine at Brasenose college. After finishing her PhD at the University of Cambridge, Professor Antoniades moved to Oxford to take up a position with Professor Christopher Kennard. She has recently set up her own research group, the NeuroMetrology Lab. She researches Parkinson’s disease and in research clinics, uses a variety of quantitative experimental methods, based on precise measurement of subtle abnormalities of the speed and coordinate of various movements such as saccades (fast eye movements), motor control (such as finger movements) along with various aspects of  gait control. She is the co-chair of the Clinical Neurosciences Society for the department and has developed the Art and Neuroscience theme with Dr Jim Harris at the Ashmolean Museum. Her interests lies in examining the neurobiological relationship between visual perception and art and is the organiser for the Brain Awareness week for the Clinical Neurosciences in Oxford. Recently, Professor Antoniades has been awarded the Vice Chancellors Award for public engagement and is passionate about engaging her research with the public.

Access: If you have a University or Bodleian Reader’s card, you can get to the Centre for Digital Scholarship through the Mackerras Reading Room on the first floor of the Weston Library, around the gallery. If you do not have access to the Weston Library you are more than welcome to attend the talk: please contact Pip Willcox before the event (pip.willcox@bodleian.ox.ac.uk).

Research Uncovered— Social and Cognitive Dimensions of the Lexicon

Prof Janet PierrehumbertWhat: Social and Cognitive Dimensions of the Lexicon

Who: Janet Pierrehumbert

When: 13.00—14.00, Tuesday 1 November 2016

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking: registration is requiredWordovators: crocoark, sharkodile, sharile

Educated adults know some 100,000 distinct words, and they encounter and create novel words all the time. Only a fraction of all words are used by the entire speech community. Most are associated with particular topics or social groups. As a result, rare and novel words provide an interesting window into the cognitive and social processes that shape lexical systems.

To investigate the structure and evolution of the lexicon, we use large scale-text mining and  psycholinguistic experiments. This talk will present examples of both methods. First, I will present a mathematical analysis of the dynamics of words in the archives of USENET discussion groups, selected because they provide data from large numbers of people (10,000 to 100,000 individuals) over long time spans (10 to 20 years). I will also talk about some experiments from the Wordovators project. This project, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, uses on-line word games in order to collect data about artificial language learning from a large and diverse pool of people. Results reveal individual variation in cognitive style, as well as social influences in games involving two people.  These interact to determine general patterns of word formation.

Wordovators: leki-lekiki; bolu-?
Janet B. Pierrehumbert
is Professor of Language Modelling in the Oxford e-Research Centre. She received her B.A. from Harvard in 1975, and her Ph.D. from MIT in 1980. She was a Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Labs in Linguistics and AI Research until 1989. From then until 2015, she was a member of the Linguistics faculty at Northwestern University. Her current research  focuses on how the dynamics of language — in acquisition, processing, or historical change — is related to the structure of linguistic systems. It combines experiments, statistical analyses of large corpora, and computational simulations of linguistic communities.  She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Linguistic Society of America, and the Cognitive Science Society.

Digital Methods—An Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative

Image: James Cummings

Image: James Cummings

Research Support, Academic IT Services and the Centre for Digital Scholarship offer a course introducing the Guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative for creating digital texts. The workshop uses materials developed for the Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School.

If you’re interested in learning about markup and encoding digital editions, this course is for you!

 

What: An Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative

Who: James Cummings and Pip Willcox

When: 10:00–16:30, Thursday 27 and Friday 28 October 2016

Where: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library (map)

Access: open to members of the University of Oxford

Admission: free

Booking is required: to reserve a place on this workshop, please email Pip Willcox, pip.willcox@bodleian.ox.ac.uk

TEI logo

This two-day workshop balances introductory-level lectures with hands-on practical sessions to introduce and survey the recommendations of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) for creation of digital text.

You don’t need any previous experience with digital text or markup: we provide introductions to markup, XML, and the infrastructure of the TEI P5 Guidelines. The TEI Guidelines are suitable for encoding any sort of text, in any language or writing system, but examples will mostly been drawn from projects the tutors have worked on.

The workshop covers general metadata, the transcription and description of manuscripts, and metadata concerning the names of people, places, and organizations. This is aimed at beginners, and the workshop alternates between lectures surveying a topic and hands-on practicals giving you a chance to practise what you have learned. There will also be time for discussion of participants’ own projects.

Equipment

Attendees are requested to bring a laptop with the latest version of oXygen XML Editor. As a member of the University, using your Single Sign On you can download this software and the required licence free of charge, via IT Services’ Software Registration and Download. If you cannot bring a laptop with you, please let us know before the day.

James Cummings is a Senior Academic Research Technology Specialist for IT Services at the University of Oxford. James is founding Director of the annual Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School and is an elected member (and previously chair) of the TEI Consortium’s Technical Council. His PhD was in Medieval Studies from the University of Leeds and he was Director of Digital Medievalist (2009–2012).

Pip Willcox is the Head of the Centre for Digital Scholarship at the Bodleian Libraries, and a Senior Researcher at the University of Oxford e-Research Centre. With a background in scholarly editing and book history, she has worked on TEI-compliant editing projects including Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership, the Shakespeare Quartos Archive, the Stationers’ Register Online, and the Bodleian First Folio. She serves on the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium Board of Directors and the Advisory Board for Digital Renaissance Editions.

Research Uncovered—TEI for manuscript description at Oxford and Cambridge

 

Bodleian Library, MS. Douce 151

Bodleian Library, MS. Douce 151

What: TEI for manuscript description at Oxford and Cambridge

Who: Matthew Holford, Huw Jones, and Chris Rogers

When: 13.00—14.00, Tuesday 25 October 2016

Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre (map)

Access: all are welcome

Admission: free

Booking: registration is required

Since 2009 the Bodleian Library and Cambridge Digital Library have been creating digital catalogues of their Western and Oriental collections following the Guidelines of the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative). The Bodleian now has nine TEI-encoded catalogues covering over 20,000 manuscripts, and a major project is currently in progress to standardize the metadata and develop a new infrastructure to support it. These papers will outline the rationale behind the choice of TEI and the challenges involved in its implementation, and describe the Bodleian’s approach to developing a user interface and sustainable cataloguing workflow.

<msDesc> at Oxford and Cambridge

Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

The TEI <msDesc> module was deliberately  created as a flexible scheme which would ‘accommodate the needs of many different classes of encoders’. The potential price of this flexibility is the development of discrete communities of practice among different users of the module resulting in small but significant differences in encoding which complicate interoperability and reuse of metadata. Many such differences can indeed be identified. Not only has the module been relatively widely adopted by digital catalogues of Western medieval manuscripts (the manuscripts for which the module was originally most obviously designed). It has also been adopted by catalogues of non-Western manuscripts and other text-bearing objects, such as Fihrist for Arabic manuscripts and Epidoc for ancient inscriptions.

This paper reports on a current project at the Bodleian Library, Oxford and the University Library, Cambridge, which is assessing how various cataloguing projects within both institutions have implemented the <msDesc> module. The aim is to simplify the technical infrastructure for storing and processing the TEI, to provide clearer guidance and improved workflow for future cataloguers, to improve interoperability within and between the respective institutions, and potentially to provide technical frameworks and metadata standards for other institutions looking to create <msDesc> records.

Creating a maintainable cataloging workflow and infrastructure using TEI

Chris Rogers

For some time, we at Bodleian Digital Library Systems and Services (BDLSS) have struggled to maintain a number of TEI-based manuscript catalogues, based on a custom built indexing and display system for which the code has diverged significantly between implementations. To resolve this, we have embarked on a project to create a new infrastructure and end-to-end workflow for delivering and maintaining TEI-based catalogues moving forward. The aim is to make life considerably easier for both developers and cataloguers.

The tools and documentation development as part of the project will be made open-source for other institutions to use and feed into. As part of this work, we have engaged in an extensive programme of user requirements-gathering, and are currently in the process of devising the technical architecture of our new solution.

This presentation explores the results of our requirements gathering exercise, and the insights gained around preferred workflows for catalogue creators, eagerness to engage directly with code, and ideas for exposing the data in novel ways. As part of the requirements-gathering exercise, we also conducted a market review, talking to organizations in the UK and the US about how they currently use TEI. We will discuss these findings, and look forward to the technical solution we will be putting in place.