Speakers

Mallinckrodt printers

Early Modern Texts: Digital Methods and Methodologies

We are grateful to these speakers for agreeing to share their research and ideas with us in Oxford, 16 – 17 September, 2013.

Robyn Adams, Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, University College London

Robyn Adams is the Senior Research Fellow at CELL and editor and PI of the Bodley project which comprises the diplomatic correspondence (Phase I, complete) and the early records of the Bodleian Library (in progress). She works on networks of information and intelligence, with an emphasis on manuscript material.

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Harriet Archer, Newcastle University

I have recently completed my doctorate at Christ Church, Oxford, on the early modern transmission and appropriation of the Mirror for Magistrates (1559-1610). I am currently editing a volume of essays on the Mirror, and am about to embark on a new project investigating novelty and innovation in 1570s English poetry. My research interests include early modern textual transmission, adaptation and the Tudor reception of the classical and medieval past; my chapter ‘Holinshed and the Middle Ages’ was published in The Oxford Handbook to Holinshed’s Chronicles in 2012.

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Alistair Baron, Lancaster University

Dr Alistair Baron is a Security Lancaster Research Fellow in the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University, UK. His primary research areas are natural language processing and cyber security. He has a particular focus on dealing with noisy textual data, especially that found in historical corpora and online interactions.

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Giles Bergel, University of Oxford

Dr Giles Bergel is Departmental Lecturer in Bibliography and Textual scholarship in the Faculty of English at the University of Oxford. He was recently project-manager of the JISC-funded Integrating Broadside Ballad Archives project. He has published essays on eighteenth-century British book trade history and modernist magazines and is editing an electronic archive of the ballad-text The Wandering Jews Chronicle. His interests include the application of digital methods to bibliographical, textual and book-historical research.

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David Brown, Trinity College Dublin

David Brown is a PhD student in Trinity College Dublin. He worked on the Down Survey of Ireland project and is currently examining the 17th-century Irish land settlements.  He has wide industry-based experience of GIS and digitisation projects.

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Daniel Carey, National University of Ireland, Galway

I am a professor of English in the School of Humanities, National University of Ireland, Galway. I have written widely on early modern travel and have edited three volumes of essays in this field: Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe (with Claire Jowitt) (2012); The Postcolonial Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Colonialism and Postcolonial Theory (with Lynn Festa) (2009; paperback 2013); and Asian Travel in the Renaissance (2004). I am co-general editor (with Claire Jowitt) of a new critical edition of Richard Hakluyt’s Principal Navigations…of the English Nation (1598-1600) for Oxford University Press.

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Thomas Dabbs, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo

I am a full professor of English at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, and the author of Genesis in Japan: the Bible beyond Christianity (2013) and Reforming Marlowe: The Nineteenth-Century Canonization of a Renaissance Dramatist (1991). Recent pertinent articles include ‘Paul’s Cross and the Dramatic Echoes of Early Elizabethan Print’ in Paul’s Cross and the Culture of Persuasion in England, 1520-1640 (2013), and also ‘The Glamorous Echoes of Godly Print’ (2011), and ‘Paul’s Cross Churchyard and Shakespeare’s Verona Youth’ (2013) in Renaissance Papers. I hold a BA from Furman University, an MA from Claremont Graduate School, and a Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina.

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Gabriel Egan, De Montfort University

Gabriel Egan is Director of the Centre for Textual Studies at De Montfort University. His most recent articles have been on the editorial problem of press variants (Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 2013) and on an accident in the printing of Q2 Hamlet (Studies in Bibliography, 2013).

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Alexandra Franklin, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford

Dr Alexandra Franklin is Project Coordinator of the Centre for the Study of the Book, Bodleian Libraries. Her research on the subject of woodcut illustrations in popular prints has recently been published as “Making sense of broadside ballad illustrations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries,” in Studies in Ephemera: Text and Image in Eighteenth-century Print, edited by Kevin D. Murphy and Sally O’Driscoll (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2013).

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Heather Froehlich, University of Strathclyde

Heather Froehlich works on features of linguistic representations of gender in the Early Modern London plays. She is especially interested in computational corpus stylistic approaches to linguistic features of literary texts. She holds a BA in English and Linguistics from the University of New Hampshire (USA), and an MRes in literary linguistics from the University of Strathclyde (UK).

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Ian Gadd, Bath Spa University

Ian Gadd is Professor of English Literature at Bath Spa University. He is a General Editor of the Cambridge Works of Jonathan Swift, and a volume editor for the new History of Oxford University Press. He is President of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing.

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Andrew Hardie, Lancaster University

Dr Andrew Hardie is a Lecturer in Corpus Linguistics at Lancaster University. His research interests include corpus construction and annotation; corpus-based approaches to grammatical theory; the languages of Asia; and the application of corpus methods across the social sciences. He is one of the lead developers of the widely-used Corpus Workbench software for indexing and analysing corpus data. He is the author, with Tony McEnery, of the book Corpus Linguistics: Method, Theory and Practice (2012).

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Sarah Hertz, University of Calgary

Sarah Hertz is a postgraduate student at the University of Cambridge (in 2013-14), in the M.Phil. in Medieval and Renaissance Studies under the supervision of Jason Scott-Warren. In 2013 she completed a BA (English honours) thesis at the University of Calgary on how digitized books affect signification processes and reading practices. She has worked as a research assistant for Michael Ullyot since 2011, designing a first-year digital humanities course on Shakespeare’s Hamlet and text-analysis tools; they are also co-authoring an article on the algorithmic detection of rhetorical figures in early modern texts, from which this presentation is excerpted. She has trained at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (University of Victoria), in the “Pre-Digital Book” seminar.

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Brett D Hirsch, University of Western Australia/De Montfort University

Brett D Hirsch is ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow and Research Assistant Professor of English and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia. He is the coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, general editor of The Bibliography of Editions of Early English Drama, and an editor of the journal Shakespeare.

In 2013, Dr Hirsch is a Leverhulme Trust Visiting Fellow at De Montfort University’s Centre for Textual Studies. His current research includes computational studies of early modern dramatic style, authorship attribution, and electronic scholarly editions.

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Anders Ingram, National University of Ireland, Galway

Dr Anders Ingram is an Irish Research Council Post Doctoral Fellow, on the Hakluyt Edition Project, employed by the National University of Ireland, Galway, but based at the University of Oxford where he is a Senior Research Associate at the Modern European History Research Centre. He has previously taught at the University of Durham and the University of the Highlands and Islands. His major research interests include the History of the Book, Travel Writing, and English writing on Islam and the Ottoman Empire, as well as developing digital tools and methodologies in historical research and teaching.

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Rupert Mann, Oxford University Press

Rupert Mann joined Oxford University Press in 1996 to work, first as Data Manager and then as Electronic Publication Manager, on the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. After it published in print and online in 2004, he worked on a number of online products before joining the Oxford Scholarly Editions Online project. He represented the digital editorial voice on the cross-functional team that took this product from the initial definition of site architecture and functionality, through datacapture and site build, to launch in September 2012. He holds a doctorate in ancient Greek literature from the University of Oxford.

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Andrew McRae, University of Exeter

Andrew McRae is Professor of Renaissance Studies at the University of Exeter. He is author of three monographs, co-editor of Early Stuart Libels, and Principal Investigator on The Stuart Successions Project.

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Rebecca Niles, Folger Shakespeare Library

Rebecca Niles is Digital Editor and Interface Architect for Folger Digital Texts. She holds Masters degrees in English Literature and Information from the University of Toronto, where she focused on the topics of textual studies, digital humanities, and the intersections between pre- and post-digital texts.

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Micheál Ó Siochrú, Trinity College Dublin

Professor Micheál Ó Siochrú lectures in History at Trinity College Dublin and is the author of numerous works on 17th-century Ireland, including God’s Executioner: Oliver Cromwell and the conquest of Ireland (London, 2009). He was one of the PIs on the AHRC-funded 1641 Depositions project, and is currently PI on the Irish Research Council funded Down Survey of Ireland project.

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Michelle O’Callaghan, University of Reading

My primary research interest is early modern literature and culture, including literature and politics, print and manuscript culture, literature and sociability, pastoral, satire, and travel-writing. I have also developed a research interest in those areas in which I teach, particularly the works of John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton. I continue to have a strong interest in the poetry of Edmund Spenser and the Spenserian poets.

Recent publications reflect my interests and include Thomas Middleton, Renaissance Dramatist (Edinburgh University Press, March 2009), and The English Wits: Literature and Sociability in Early Modern England. Cambridge University Press, 2007.

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Michael Poston, Folger Shakespeare Library

Michael Poston is Digital Editor and Encoding Architect for Folger Digital Texts. He has developed numerous resources for the Folger, including the Union First-Line Index, PLRE.Folger, a paleography transcription and collation site called Dromio, a tool for teaching the history of the book called Impos[i]tor, and digital displays for Folger Exhibitions.

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Paul Rayson, Lancaster University

Dr Paul Rayson is a Senior Lecturer in Computer Science at Lancaster University, UK. He is director of the UCREL interdisciplinary research centre which carries out research in corpus linguistics and natural language processing. His applied research is in the areas of online child protection, learner dictionaries, and text mining of historical corpora and annual financial reports.

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Michael Ullyot, University of Calgary

Michael Ullyot is an assistant professor of English at the University of Calgary. I’m engaged in two research projects at the moment (mid-2013). The first is a book (Virtuous Lies: The Rhetoric of Exemplarity in Early Modern England) on exemplarity, or the citation of illustrative and persuasive stories to provoke different reactions in their audiences. My other project, The Zeugmatic, is a SSHRC-funded test case to automate the detection of rhetorical figures in early modern English, combining natural-language processing algorithms with an interface for human readers to teach computers to recognize Shakespeare’s figures more subtly and consistently. I have published three articles in journals (Clio; Journal of the Northern Renaissance; and Spenser Studies); four book chapters; and seven book reviews.

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John West, University of Exeter

John West is Associate Research Fellow on The Stuart Successions Project in the Department of English at the University of Exeter.

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Lizzy Williamson, Queen Mary, University of London

Lizzy Williamson is currently working as Network Facilitator on the News Networks in Early Modern Europe project. She works on early modern diplomacy, intelligence and the history of information, and the early modern archive. Interested in the manuscript and the digital, she blogs and tweets as @earlymodernpost.

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Jane Winters, Institute of Historical Research, University of London

Jane Winters is Reader in Digital Humanities and Head of Publications and IHR Digital at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR), University of London. She is responsible for the IHR’s publishing and scholarly communications strategy, including the management of a range of research projects focusing on the provision of digital resources for historians. Current and past projects include British History Online, Connected Histories, Early English Laws, Analytical Access to the Domain Dark Archive (AADDA), InScribe and the Social Media Knowledge Exchange. Jane is also Executive Editor of Historical Research and Publishing Editor of the Bibliography of British and Irish History.

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Mary Erica Zimmer, Boston University

Mary Erica Zimmer is a Ph.D. candidate in The Editorial Institute at Boston University who is honored to have developed her current digital project through the National Endowment for the Humanities’ “Early Modern Digital Agendas” Summer Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library. She holds graduate degrees in medieval and early modern literatures from the University of St. Andrews and the University of Chicago, and her dissertation will serve as a companion volume to selected poems of Geoffrey Hill.

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