Newly received History books: South America, Black Tudors, Samurai, the Atlantic World and more

Another week another selection of books recently added to the HFL collection. This week includes a number of books on South American political history alongside titles on the Samurai and Japan, race in Tudor England, and a history of homosexuality in our capital. Click the image below to be taken to a full list of recently aquired items.

Sader, Emir. – Without fear of being happy : Lula, the Workers Party and Brazil (1991 | London : Verso)

O’Shaughnessy, Hugh. – The priest of Paraguay : Fernando Lugo and the making of a nation (2009 | London : Zed)

Kaufmann, Miranda. – Black Tudors : the untold story (2017 | London : Oneworld)

Ikegami, Eiko. – The taming of the samurai : honorific individualism and the making of modern Japan (1995 | Cambridge, Mass ; London : Harvard University Press)

Egerton, Douglas R – The Atlantic world : a history, 1400-1888 (2007 | Wheeling, Ill. : Harlan Davidson)

Ackroyd, Peter. – Queer city : Gay London from the romans to the present day (2017 | London : Chatto & Windus)

There are more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Christmas opening hours

The Bodleian Library (Old Library reading rooms only including Duke Humfrey) will close for the Christmas break at 5pm on Friday 22 December 2017.

The Radcliffe Camera (including the Gladstone Link*) will close at 7pm on Thursday 21 December 2017. These areas of the Bodleian will not open on Friday 22 December. *Please note the Gladstone Link closes at 6.15pm.

All parts of the Library will re-open to readers at 9am on Tuesday 2 January 2017.

The last delivery of material from storage will arrive on the morning of Thursday 21 December. The deadline for placing requests for this last delivery is expected to be no later than 7.20pm on Wednesday 20 December.

It will be possible to request items via SOLO throughout the closed period. The first delivery of the New Year will arrive on Tuesday 2 January, and staff expect to clear any backlog of requests by Friday 5 January at the latest.

Have an enjoyable Christmas break everyone, we’re certainly looking forward to it!

New LibGuide: Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th – 21st centuries

Newspapers are a wonderful source for historians. They are useful to find out about key events, people and places. They also include opinion pieces, of either writers, editors or members of the public in form of Letters to the Editor. All sorts of ephemera (weather forecasts, court circulars, advertising, sport results, etc.) give insight into daily life. Larger newspapers will also provide battle or war reports, law or court reports and parliamentary reports, including occasional reproductions of full-text speeches.

Finding and using newspapers effectively, however, and navigating your way through large newspaper datasets can be tricky. Help is now at hand!

A new LibGuide Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th – 21st centuries aims to outline which newspaper and news resources, with the emphasis on online availability, are available in Oxford. While we aim to be global in our coverage, some countries or regions will have more newspaper resources than others. We have included all of Oxford’s online subscriptions, covering the 17th to the 21st centuries, and, where possible, provided details of many newspapers on microfilms, print or free on the web. Please note, therefore, that this guide is not a complete catalogue of Oxford’s newspapers.

You can browse by country/ region or by title.

The guide also alerts you to common problems and gives tips how you best construct your searches. For instance, you need to consider in which section of a newspaper you are searching and be careful what search terms to use, especially when searching full-text.

The layout of articles or advertising may also be relevant. Unfortunately many modern newspaper collections have not retained the original formatting. We provide guidance where this is the case:

Finally, we have added resources to help understand newspapers as source materials and suggested further readings.

We hope this guide will be useful to researchers. Feedback is welcome, so email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk if you have any comments, questions or suggestions on historical newspaper resources.

Also useful

More blog posts on newspapers

Trial until 24 December: San Francisco Chronicle, 1865-1984

The Vere Harmsworth Library is running a trial of the San Francisco Chronicle 1865-1984.  Researchers at Oxford are invited to explore it and send any comments or feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

We now have trial access to the San Francisco Chronicle, 1865-1984, via Readex’s America’s Historical Newspapers platform. Access is available via OxLIP+ until 24th December…

Source: Trial until 24 December: San Francisco Chronicle, 1865-1984

Refreshed Oxford Dictionary of National Biography launched

Great news! OUP has refreshed the interface and improved the searching of the much beloved Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB). Although they have continually made improvements to the design and functionality since 2004, it is was time for a more radical overhaul.

The new site has a modern look and feel to it. The home page features a simple search box and a list of featured articles, podcasts, and news via the OUP Twitter feed (@odnb). The real change is much more intuitive searching functionality

The novice ODNB searcher will be more easily guided to construct more complex searches and dig deeper into the resource. If you are used to constructing complex searches in ODNB, then fear not. There are plenty of opportunities to refine or modify your search afterwards. For instance, you can add filters, e.g. by gender, occupation and find articles with images. You can also decide to search full-text or search in other fields, such as place, aristocratic title, contributor, etc.

I also like the reference lists and themed collections which are curated biographies of individuals on a wide range of topics or groups. They are tucked away, a little surprisingly considering how useful they are, but can be found, along with featured essays, in Tools & Resources. These lists reveal the little known geographical reach of the ODNB, covering history beyond Britain as many biographies relate to the British Empire.

Examples from the Reference Group and Reference Lists:

  • Advisers of King John (act. 1215)
  • Salem witches and their accusers (act 1692)
  • Papal legates to medieval Britain and Ireland in the Oxford DNB
  • Competition wallahs (act. 1855-1891)
  • Ministers and secretaries of state for health (1919–2013)
  • Colonial administrators and post-independence leaders in Kenya (1895–2000)
  • Holders of the Faraday medal of the Institute of Electrical Engineers(1922–2013)
  • Principal librarians and directors of the British Museum (1756–2013)

“Masters of the rolls (1286–2013).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 20 Nov. 2017. http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-92826.

The more prominently positioned option to browse by Occupation or by Religious Affiliation is useful. Particularly the latter gives a wonderful insight into important non-British individuals who nonetheless played a significant role in British history.

Search by Religious Affiliation > Hinduism

Once you have found your biography, it is easy to save or share the citation and articles though the list of citations styles (APA, MLA and Chicago) is a little short compared to other resources.

Once you have created a personal profile, you can also save your favourite searches and biographies and add your own notes.

Overall, here is a big thumbs up from me. Happy ODNB searching!

What is the ODNB?

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford DNB) is the national record of men and women who have shaped British history and culture, worldwide, from the Romans to the 21st century.

Also useful:

Find more online biographical resources in OxLIP > Subject > Biographical resources.

Vacation Loans & Season’s Greetings!

Vacation loans start today – borrow up to 15 books. This increases to 20 books on Thursday 29 November and will include short loans. Everything is due back on Monday 15 January.

We hope everyone has a restful and Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year! If you get fed up eating mince pies and drinking mulled wine (impossible though that sounds) don’t forget you can access many of our resources online. With your Single Sign On login, you can access all our ebookejournal and database subscriptions while away from Oxford.

Here’s the Bodleian tree atmospherically lit up for the final week of Term. Have a fantastic Christmas break everyone!

Newly received History books: German art and war, white slavery, cultural assimilation and an English master.

Below is a small selection of new books that have been added to our collections in the past fortnight, this week’s selection isn’t themed but does include a varied selection of social, cultural and art history.

Potter, Pamela Maxine, Art of suppression : confronting the Nazi past in histories of the visual and performing arts (University of California Press, 2016)

Hales, Petrescu and Weinstein (eds.), Continuity and crisis in German cinema, 1928-1936 (New York : Camden House, 2016)

Merritt, Keri Leigh, Masterless men : poor whites and slavery in the antebellum South (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Wiese and Wilhelm (eds.) American Jewry : transcending the European experience? (London : Bloomsbury Academic, 2017)

Woods, Gregory, Homintern : how gay culture liberated the modern world (Yale University Press, 2016)

Shanes, Eric, Young Mr Turner : the first forty years, 1775-1815 (Yale University Press, 2016)

 

There are more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Chapter downloads in ACLS Humanities ebooks now possible

Good news! ACLS Humanities E-Book (HEB) has announced that chapter downloads are now available in their ebooks collection. Previously you could only download page by page.

Please note that this new and welcome functionality currently only applies to HEB titles in page image format.  You can spot them if they have the following red book icon:

Once you’ve selected your chapter from the Table of Contents (ToC), just select Chapter PDF to download it.

Many HEB titles will, however, be in XML format, i.e. the text is encoded. Chapter download for HEB XML formatted ebooks is currently not possible though I am told that this will be looked at.

Also of interest:

  1. ACLS Humanities E-Book (subscription resource available to Oxford researchers)
  2. Knowing your EBL from your ebrary: guide to ebooks

British History Online and the Bibliography of British and Irish History – not just British

Read this great blogpost from the Institute of Historical Research on the global coverage of British History Online and the Bibliography of British and Irish History.

They are wonderful resources and easy to use. Take a look now!

From the titles of some of the IHR’s digital resources, you might think that they have limited geographical reach: British History Online…the Bibliography of British and Irish History. …

Source: British History Online and the Bibliography of British and Irish History – not just British

Trial until 31 January 2018: The Chicago Manual of Style Online (17th ed.)

Oxford researchers and students are now invited to trial the online version of Chicago Manual of Style Online (17th ed.). It is available via SOLO or OxLIP+.First published in 1906 by Chicago University Press, the Chicago Style Manual’s Notes and Bibliographies system is one of the most widely used citation styles in the Humanities. Its Author-Date system is more commonly used in the Sciences and Social Sciences.

The online edition of this authoritative reference work is full-text searchable. It also includes the 16th edition and be read and browsed as a book. The content covers the publishing process, style and usage, and source citations and indexes. When reading the Chapter 4 (Rights, Permissions, and Copyright Administration) please remember that it will refer to the US copyright regulations. A quick guide is available as are Q&As and video tutorials.

Please send feedback to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Also useful: