New Books Display – January 2023

Happy New Year to all returning and new readers! Currently on our New Books Display for the beginning of 2023, you can find a varied selection of the library’s latest additions.

Several of our newest books are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Please click on each title to be taken to its SOLO record.

On Revolution by political theorist Hannah Arendt presents a comparison of the French and American revolutions of the eighteenth century and the impact of these revolutions on our modern world. Underpinning this comparison is an in-depth exploration of the concept of revolution itself, as it has manifested throughout human history.

Next up we have a new English translation of Autumntide of the Middle Ages: A study of forms of life and thought of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in France and the Low Countries by the renowned Dutch historian Johan Huizinga. This influential book is considered a monumental work in its discussion of the ritual, culture, and thought of late medieval society in France and the Netherlands.

Here, There and Everywhere: The Foreign Politics of American Popular Culture is an edited anthology of articles exploring the impact of American popular culture on the wider world. In five sections, 23 authors from around the globe examine the historical background of American culture, the impact of Hollywood, popular music from jazz to rock ‘n’ roll and rap, and the popularity of as well as resistance to American popular culture in particular countries.

These items and many more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link, and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.

New eBooks are also available, several of which are featured below. Click to be taken to the SOLO link.

 

New Books Display – December 2022

Currently on our New Books Display for the month of December, you can find a varied selection of our newest additions to the library. Several books are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Please click to be taken to the SOLO record.

‘Blood, Fire and Gold: The Story of Elizabeth I and Catherine de Medici,’ by Estelle Paranque presents a new look at the two most powerful women of sixteenth-century Europe. Their friendship over the course of thirty years included competition and conflict; drawing on primary sources such as Elizabeth and Catherine’s personal correspondence, this is the first work to examine their complicated relationship in depth.

Also featured is ‘Tudor England: A History,’ by Oxford historian Lucy Wooding. Presenting a new take the Tudors between 1485 and 1603, the books focuses on how political, religious, and economic upheavals during the Tudor dynasty affected the lives of the general populace of England, particularly those who were not of the nobility, a side of Tudor England that has often been overlooked.

‘Misinformation Nation: Foreign News and the Politics of Truth in Revolutionary America,’ by Jordan E. Taylor, associate professor of history at Indiana University Bloomington, outlines how increasing consumption of foreign newspapers had a huge impact on the early colonists’ decision to revolt against British rule and create a new nation. News powered early American politics, but newspaper printers had few reliable sources to report on events from abroad. Information regarding battles, declarations and constitutions was often contradictory and unreliable, but shaped the people’s sense of reality. The books presents a striking and original argument about the early years of the United States.

‘East Asia and the First World War’ by Frank Jacob of Norway University examines how the First World War in East Asia facilitated the further rise of Japan as the leading power in the region, as well as contributing to radical social upheaval after the war concluded. In China and Korea, the effects of the First World War led to the growth of nationalistic movements, seeking freedom and equality for the people living within their semi-colonized borders. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the First World War and its impact on East Asia.

These items and more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link, and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.

 

New Books Display – November 2022

Currently on our New Books Display, you can find a varied selection of our newest additions to the library.
Some items of note include ‘Horizons: A Global History of Science,’ in which author James Poskett traces the development of modern science from 1450 onwards, with particular focus on non-European contexts and contributions. The book has been praised for presenting a wide-ranging and comprehensive demonstration of the global exchange that led to the development and breakthroughs of science as we continue to understand it today.
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We also have ‘Ireland and the Crusades,’ by Edward Coleman, Paul Duffy and Tadhg O’Keefe. This book takes a comprehensive look, based on new research, that demonstrates a more nuanced picture of Ireland’s often overlooked role in the crusading period.
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Finally, we have ‘Peasants Making History’ by Christopher Dyer, which offers a new look at the lives and contributions of people of lower socio-economic status (for example, in the development of urbanised areas, trading, and religion) in the medieval English midlands.
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These items and more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.
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New eBooks are also available, several of which are featured below. These can be accessed online once you are logged onto your SOLO account. Please click to go to the SOLO record.
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Welcome to the HFL!

Welcome, new and returning History students! We’re here to help you get started with finding your way around the History Faculty Library (HFL) and locating the books and online resources on your reading lists.

Make a start with the Bodleian Libraries welcome page, which will introduce you to key facilities and search tools. Next, check out our online guide to the History Faculty Library for further information on the collections and reading rooms in the HFL.

We’re based in the Radcliffe Camera in the centre of Oxford, so we’re easy to find! You can book online for one of our Welcome Tours to learn about using our reading rooms and resources. Alternatively, we also offer a Virtual Welcome Tour of our facilities and services. We have pages tailored to specific subjects and research guides, which can help you identify resources and tools for your study.

For the most up-to-date information on our services, please see the Bodleian Libraries website. If you need any help or have any questions then please drop in or get in touch with us at library.history@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Please note, to continue safeguarding our spaces for readers and staff we are encouraging the use of face masks within the library. Hand sanitiser and cleaning materials are also located throughout the reading rooms.

History of the British Isles Assessment

For those of you about to undertake the History of the British Isles assessment, please note that library staff will be ready and willing to offer assistance during the next few weeks – whether in person or remotely if you’re unable to visit the library. Please approach us if you need help locating resources (physical or electronic) or contact us at library.history@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with any further questions. Most importantly, good luck!

Vacation Loans

With the end of Trinity Term fast approaching, readers are advised that vacation borrowing for the summer will commence on Wednesday 23rd June. Please note, this is 9th week, due to the History of the British Isles assessment for 2nd year History undergraduates. From this date onwards, HFL borrowing limits will increase to 30 items (short loans inclusive), with a due date of Monday 11th October.

We completely understand that this has been a challenging time for library users, so please don’t hesitate to get in contact at library.history@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with any queries about our collections or services.

Self-issue update: upgrades and additions

Bodleian Libraries are currently in the process of upgrading all self-issue machines, which should ensure that we’re able to offer readers a reliable and secure service. Unfortunately this will result in a temporary break in service, but we’re hopeful things will be up and running again by the end of January. In the meantime staff at the issue desk are more than happy to help anyone wishing to issue books. 

We’re also pleased to report that in the coming weeks the HFL will be receiving a second self-issue machine, which will be trialled in the Upper Gladstone Link. The machine will initially be located beside the PCAS machine on the Camera side of the reading room, where we hope it will prove a convenient addition for readers accessing collections in this area. We’re very keen to receive any feedback regarding the trial, so please email any comments or questions to library.history@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Further updates will be provided when the machine is up and running! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vacation Loans start Monday!

Just a quick notification that winter vacation loans start on Monday 2nd December – borrow up to 15 books. Your limit increases to 20 books on Thursday 5th December and will include Short Loans. Everything will be due back on Monday 20th January (1st Week).

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! If you decide you’d like to combine your mince pies with some festive reading, you can access access many of our resources electronically. Use your Single Sign On to make use of a range of ebookejournal and database subscriptions while away from Oxford.

Portable DVD drives available for loan!

In response to reader feedback, we’re pleased to announce that we now have two portable DVD drives available for loan. History students may be particularly interested in using these to consult items from the HFL DVD collection. The devices are quick and easy to use, compatible with most operating systems, and can be issued for two days (plus one online renewal). Please let us know if you have any feedback – we’re always looking to improve access to our collections.

New sit-stand desks in the Upper Gladstone Link

We are currently trialling two ergonomic desk devices in the Upper Gladstone Link that allow readers to adjust their position to either sit or stand at their work space. The WorkFit-Z mini is adapted to hold one of our Reader PCs, whilst the Opløft facilitates materials, such as books, notepads and laptops, to be raised to varying heights.

We’re interested in hearing any reader feedback on the benefits or disadvantages of these devices in helping you study. Please let a member of staff know your views!

The location of the devices is indicated on the map below: