LGBT+ History Month 2024

LGBT+ History Month is an annual month-long observance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history, including the histories of other marginalised sexualities and gender identities. Last year’s observance marked 20 years since the law that banned “promotion of homosexuality” in the UK, Section 28, was repealed. This year’s theme is ‘Under the Scope’, celebrating LGBT+ peoples’ contribution to the field of medicine and shining a light on the history of the LGBT+ community’s experience of receiving healthcare.

LGBT+ History Month display on four shelves. Left to right: 'Tomboys and bachelor girls' by Rebecca Jennings; 'Britannia's glory, a history of 20th century lesbians' by Emily Hamer; 'A lesbian history of Britain' by Rebecca Jennings; 'Let the record show, a political history of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993' by Sarah Schulman; 'How to survive a plague' by David France; 'Before AIDS' by Katie Batza; 'Stonewall' by Martin Duberman; 'Red closet : the hidden history of gay oppression in the USSR' by Rustam Alexander; 'Before we were trans' by Kit Heyam; 'Queer public history' by Marc Stein; 'The shape of sex : nonbinary gender from Genesis to the Renaissance' by Leah DeVun; 'Same-sex sexuality in later medieval English culture' by Tom Linkinen; 'Queer voices in post-war Scotland' by Jeffrey Meek; 'A little gay history : desire and diversity across the world' by R. B. Parkinson

Our book display for LGBT+ History Month features some of these stories of AIDs activism and experiences in healthcare, as well as histories of queer oppression, revolution, and lived experiences across the globe from 200 AD to the present day. Please do peruse the display the next time you’re in the Camera, or check out some of our e-books and e-journals below.

When signed into SOLO with your ‘Single Sign On’, the following e-resources will be available for Oxford University Members—click on the covers below to access their SOLO records. Many more e-resources and physical books can be found by searching on SOLO.

Outrageous! : the story of Section 28 and Britain's battle for LGBT education by Paul Baker

Sapphistries : A Global History of Love between Women by Leila J. Rupp

 

 

 

Plane queer : labor, sexuality, and AIDS in the history of male flight attendants by Phil Tiemeyer

 

Bi : the hidden culture, history and science of bisexuality by Julia Shaw

 

Journal of the history of sexuality
The Routledge history of queer America edited by Don Romesburg

Seeing sodomy in the Middle Ages by Robert Mills

GLQ : a journal of lesbian and gay studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK Disability History Month 2023

UK Disability History Month is an annual event, running from 16th November to 16th December, focusing on the history of the disability rights movement and commemoration of the achievements of people living with disabilities. At the History Faculty Library, we have put together a display highlighting the histories of people living with disabilities from antiquity to the near-present.

As well as physical books, we also have a variety of e-books and e-journals which explore these issues. When signed into SOLO with your ‘Single Sign On’, the following e-resources will be available for Oxford University Members—click on the covers below to access their SOLO records. Many more e-resources and physical books can be found on SOLO by searching for ‘disability history’ or by following the links above.

 

The Ugly Laws : Disability in Public Understanding disability throughout historyDisability and society (Journal) Disability rights and wrongs revisited Destigmatising mental illness? Disability rights and religious liberty in education Disability histories A cultural history of disability in antiquity

Trans Awareness Week 2023

To celebrate Trans Awareness Week, running 13th-19th November, we have created a display from our collections highlighting the current and historical issues faced by trans, non-binary and gender-diverse people, and recognising those raising awareness. This annual event will culminate in Transgender Day of Remembrance on Sunday, a day of observance honouring the memory of those who lost their lives in acts of transphobic violence.

Top shelf (left to right): Autobiography of an androgyne ; A history of women in men's clothes : from cross-dressing to empowerment ; British queer history. Second shelf: Queer public history ; Transgender warriors ; True sex : the lives of trans men at the turn of the twentieth century. Third shelf: Ambiguous gender in early modern Spain and Portugal ; Unmaking sex ; Stonewall : the definitive story of the LGBTQ rights uprising that changed America ; Queer beyond London. Bottom Shelf: Governing gender and sexuality in colonial India ; From a girl to a man : how Laura became Michael ; LGBT Victorians ; Gender : a world history.

As well as physical books, we also have a variety of e-books and e-journals which explore these issues. When signed into SOLO with your ‘Single Sign On’, the following e-resources will be available for Oxford University Members. Click on the covers below to access their SOLO records.

Transgender Studies QuarterlyBrown Trans FigurationsFemale husbands : a trans historyBlack trans feminismThe transgender issue : an argument for justice Trans Britain : our journey from the shadowsTrans historical : gender plurality before the modern Others of my kind : transatlantic transgender histories

Black History Month 2023: Saluting Our Sisters

BHM 2023 : Dig Deeper, Look Closer, Think Bigger

To celebrate Black History Month 2023, running from the 1st October – 31st October, we have curated a display highlighting the exceptional achievements and experiences of black people throughout history. This year’s theme is Saluting Our Sisters, therefore this display focuses on the overlooked contributions of black women to culture, politics, and the struggle against racial injustices.


To complement our display of physical books, we would also like to highlight some of our e-books on black history, available online for Oxford University members to read remotely. Once signed into SOLO with your single sign on, search for these titles or click on the book covers below to access their SOLO records and start reading!

 Sisters in the struggle African American women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement, edited by Bettye Collier-Thomas and V.P. Franklin Beyond Respectability : The Intellectual Thought of Race Women by Brittney C. Cooper  Why I'm no longer talking to white people about race by Reni Eddo-Lodge  At home in our sounds : music, race, and cultural politics in interwar Paris by Rachel Anne Gillett  To 'joy my freedom : Southern Black women's lives and labors after the Civil War by Tera W. Hunter  Divas on screen Black women in American film by Mia Mask Fugitive Pedagogy : Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching by Jarvis R. Givens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The making of black lives matter : a brief history of an idea by Christopher J. Lebron

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout October, Oxford University will be hosting a series of exhibitions and lectures for Black History Month. See here for more details.

Summer Vacation Loans start 21 June 2023

With the end of term fast approaching, readers are advised that HFL borrowing for the summer will begin on Wednesday 21st June. Please note, this is in 9th Week due to the History of the British Isles assessment that takes place during the preceding week. From this date onwards HFL borrowing limits will increase to 30 items (short loans inclusive), with a due date of Monday 9th October. Wishing you all the best of luck in the coming weeks!

New Books Display – February 2023

Currently on our New Books Display for the month of February, you can find a wide selection of the latest additions to the History Faculty Library’s collection, covering a range of historical periods and subject matter. Several items are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Click the photo to be taken to the item’s SOLO record. All NBD items can be borrowed at the Circulation desk in the Lower Camera reading room.

The Mughals and the Sufis: Islam and Political Imagination in India, 1500-1750 by University of Chicago Professor Muzaffar Alam, presents the author’s findings through a critical study of a large number of contemporary Persian texts, court chronicles, epistolary collections, and biographies of Sufi mystics. Professor Alam examines the complexities in the relationship between Mughal political culture and the two dominant strains of Islam’s Sufi traditions in South Asia. Muzaffar Alam analyses the interplay of these elements, their negotiation and struggle for resolution via conflict and coordination, and their longer-term outcomes as the empire followed its own political and cultural trajectory as it shifted from the more liberal outlook of Emperor Akbar “The Great” (r. 1556-1605) to the more rigid attitudes of his great-grandson, Aurangzeb Alamgir (r. 1658-1701). Alam brings to light many new and underutilized sources relevant to the religious and cultural history of the Mughals and reinterprets well-known sources from a new perspective to provide one of the most detailed and nuanced portraits of Indian Islam under the Mughal Empire available today.

The Persistence of Party: Ideas of Harmonious discord in Eighteenth-Century Britain by Dr Max Skjönsberg examines the development of how the idea of a political party was viewed in the eighteenth century, at a time when some of the core components of modern, representative politics were being trialled. From Bolingbroke to Burke, political thinkers regarded party as a fundamental concept of politics, especially in the parliamentary system of Britain. In the eighteenth century, the concept of a political party was usually understood as a set of flexible and evolving principles, associated with names and traditions, which categorised and managed political actors, voters, and commentators. This book seeks to demonstrate that the idea of party as ideological unity is not purely a nineteenth- or twentieth-century phenomenon, but can be traced to its roots in the eighteenth century. Also available as an eBook through Cambridge Core, accessible once you are signed into SOLO via your Single Sign On.

 From Near and Far: a Transnational History of France by historian Tyler Stovall relates the history of modern France from the French Revolution to the present. The work considers how the history of France interacts with both the broader history of the world and the local histories of French communities, examining the impacts of such figures as Karl Marx, Ho Chi Minh, Paul Gauguin, and Josephine Baker, alongside the rise of haute couture and contemporary art movements. Particularly, the nation’s relationship with Europe, the United States, and the French colonial empire is contextualized and examined in depth. This ‘transnational’ approach to the history of modern France allows Dr. Stovall to explain how the theme of universalism, so central to modern French culture, has manifested itself in different ways over the last few centuries. Furthermore, it emphasizes the importance of historical narrative both within and outside the boundaries of the nation. From Near and Far therefore situates the reader in a vision of France that is simultaneously global and local.

The Dutch Overseas Empire: 1600-1800 by Pieter C. Emmer and Jos J. L. Gommans is a new work that attempts to answer the question of how the Dutch empire compared to other imperial enterprises, and how it was experienced by the indigenous peoples who became a part of its colonial power. Beginning in the seventeenth century, the Dutch Republic emerged at the centre of a global empire that stretched along the edges of continents. In this empire, ideas of religious tolerance and scientific curiosity went hand in hand with severe political and economic exploitation of the local populations through violence and slavery. This pioneering history of the early modern Dutch Empire, encompassing two centuries, provides for the first time a comparative and indigenous perspective on Dutch overseas expansion. As well as the impact of the empire on the economy and society in the Dutch Republic itself, it also offers a fascinating window into the contemporary societies of Asia, Africa and the Americas: through their interactions, we see the effect of the Dutch overseas empire on processes of early modern globalization. Also available electronically through Cambridge Core, accessed via SOLO.

The Witches of St. Osyth: persecution, betrayal and murder in Elizabethan England by University of Exeter historian Marion Gibson is an account of witch trials in Essex (1581-2). Despite the history of English witchcraft and documented witch hunts and trials being studied extensively, the events are St. Osyth have been overlooked in previous scholarship. These accusations caused a destructive wave of persecution which tore apart this Essex community. Using fresh archival sources that pertain not only to the village of St. Osyth itself, but also its neighbouring hamlets, Gibson offers a comprehensive exploration into the sixteen women and one man who were accusd of practicing sorcery in addition to posing provocative and relevant questions about the way history is recollected and interpreted. Combining landscape fieldwork and readings of crucial documents, the author skilfully unlocks the poignant personal histories of those whose voices have been lost to history. Also available electronically through Cambridge Core, accessible through your SOLO account.

Queens of the age of Chivalry: England’s fourteenth-century Consorts, 1299-1409 by Alison Weir is the newest work by well-known public historian Weir, whose expertise lies in both medieval and post-medieval biography and historical fiction of the royalty of England, particularly when it comes to the lesser documented lives of female figures. Medieval queens were seen as mere dynastic trophies and political pawns, yet many of the Plantagenet queens of the High Middle Ages dramatically broke away from the restrictions imposed on them and wielded considerable influence over the male courtly figures who surrounded them, as well as the kingdom as a whole. Using personal letters and other vivid primary sources, Weir evokes the lives of five of these remarkable queens of the chivalric age: Marguerite of France, Isabella of France, Philippa of Hainault, Anne of Bohemia and Isabella of Valois. Each of these women lived through a period which oversaw some of the most environmentally and politically turbulent events in English and wider European history, including the Black Death, the Peasants’ Revolt, the Hundred Years War against France and baronial civil wars against their own monarchy. The turbulence of the fourteenth-century, and these Queen’s role in it, set the stage for the later dramatic events of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries to unfold as the Middle Ages drew to a close and Europe entered the early modern period.

On Savage Shores: how Indigenous Americans Discovered Europe by University of Sheffield historian Dr. Caroline Dodds Pennock. This work has grown out of her cutting edge researches into the transatlantic journeys and exploration of Indigenous Mesoamerican and North American peoples during the sixteenth century. Although the reason for this was often due to the slave trade, Pennock documents other reasons for these individual’s travels to Europe – as diplomats, merchants and explorers. Pennock presents the story of the Brazilian king who met Henry VIII; the Aztecs who mocked up human sacrifice at the court of Charles V; the Inuk baby who was put on show in a London pub; the children of Indigenous American mothers and Spanish fathers who then returned to Spain – as well as the many servants employed by Europeans of every rank. The people of the Americas were regarded as exotic and were marginalised by European society; but their interactions, worldviews, and cultures still had a profound impact on European civilisation. Drawing on first-hand account of their surviving literature and poetry, as well as European eyewitness accounts, Pennock gives us a sweeping and monumental presentation of Indigenous American presence in early modern Europe.

Jewish Daily Life in Medieval Northern Europe 1080-1350: A Sourcebook is an edited collection with contributions by several social historians, designed to introduce researchers to the everyday lives of Jewish people living in the German Empire, northern France, and England from the 11th to the mid-14th centuries. The volume consists of translations of primary sources written by or about medieval Jews. Each source is accompanied by an introduction that provides it’s historical context. Through the sources, readers can become familiar with the spaces frequented by medieval Jewish Europeans, their daily practices and rituals, and their worldview and wider culture. The subject matter ranges from culinary preferences, garments, objects, and communal buildings and relationships. The documents testify to how Sabbath and holidays were enacted, weddings and births celebrated, and the mourning of the dead. Some of the sources focus on the relationships they had with their Christian neighbours, local authorities, and the Christian Church, while others shed light on their economic activities and professional life.

New Books Display – January 2023

Happy New Year to all returning and new readers! Currently on our New Books Display for the beginning of 2023, you can find a varied selection of the library’s latest additions.

Several of our newest books are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Please click on each title to be taken to its SOLO record.

On Revolution by political theorist Hannah Arendt presents a comparison of the French and American revolutions of the eighteenth century and the impact of these revolutions on our modern world. Underpinning this comparison is an in-depth exploration of the concept of revolution itself, as it has manifested throughout human history.

Next up we have a new English translation of Autumntide of the Middle Ages: A study of forms of life and thought of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in France and the Low Countries by the renowned Dutch historian Johan Huizinga. This influential book is considered a monumental work in its discussion of the ritual, culture, and thought of late medieval society in France and the Netherlands.

Here, There and Everywhere: The Foreign Politics of American Popular Culture is an edited anthology of articles exploring the impact of American popular culture on the wider world. In five sections, 23 authors from around the globe examine the historical background of American culture, the impact of Hollywood, popular music from jazz to rock ‘n’ roll and rap, and the popularity of as well as resistance to American popular culture in particular countries.

These items and many more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link, and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.

New eBooks are also available, several of which are featured below. Click to be taken to the SOLO link.

 

New Books Display – December 2022

Currently on our New Books Display for the month of December, you can find a varied selection of our newest additions to the library. Several books are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Please click to be taken to the SOLO record.

‘Blood, Fire and Gold: The Story of Elizabeth I and Catherine de Medici,’ by Estelle Paranque presents a new look at the two most powerful women of sixteenth-century Europe. Their friendship over the course of thirty years included competition and conflict; drawing on primary sources such as Elizabeth and Catherine’s personal correspondence, this is the first work to examine their complicated relationship in depth.

Also featured is ‘Tudor England: A History,’ by Oxford historian Lucy Wooding. Presenting a new take the Tudors between 1485 and 1603, the books focuses on how political, religious, and economic upheavals during the Tudor dynasty affected the lives of the general populace of England, particularly those who were not of the nobility, a side of Tudor England that has often been overlooked.

‘Misinformation Nation: Foreign News and the Politics of Truth in Revolutionary America,’ by Jordan E. Taylor, associate professor of history at Indiana University Bloomington, outlines how increasing consumption of foreign newspapers had a huge impact on the early colonists’ decision to revolt against British rule and create a new nation. News powered early American politics, but newspaper printers had few reliable sources to report on events from abroad. Information regarding battles, declarations and constitutions was often contradictory and unreliable, but shaped the people’s sense of reality. The books presents a striking and original argument about the early years of the United States.

‘East Asia and the First World War’ by Frank Jacob of Norway University examines how the First World War in East Asia facilitated the further rise of Japan as the leading power in the region, as well as contributing to radical social upheaval after the war concluded. In China and Korea, the effects of the First World War led to the growth of nationalistic movements, seeking freedom and equality for the people living within their semi-colonized borders. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the First World War and its impact on East Asia.

These items and more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link, and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.

 

New Books Display – November 2022

Currently on our New Books Display, you can find a varied selection of our newest additions to the library.
Some items of note include ‘Horizons: A Global History of Science,’ in which author James Poskett traces the development of modern science from 1450 onwards, with particular focus on non-European contexts and contributions. The book has been praised for presenting a wide-ranging and comprehensive demonstration of the global exchange that led to the development and breakthroughs of science as we continue to understand it today.
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We also have ‘Ireland and the Crusades,’ by Edward Coleman, Paul Duffy and Tadhg O’Keefe. This book takes a comprehensive look, based on new research, that demonstrates a more nuanced picture of Ireland’s often overlooked role in the crusading period.
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Finally, we have ‘Peasants Making History’ by Christopher Dyer, which offers a new look at the lives and contributions of people of lower socio-economic status (for example, in the development of urbanised areas, trading, and religion) in the medieval English midlands.
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These items and more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.
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New eBooks are also available, several of which are featured below. These can be accessed online once you are logged onto your SOLO account. Please click to go to the SOLO record.
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Welcome to the HFL!

Welcome, new and returning History students! We’re here to help you get started with finding your way around the History Faculty Library (HFL) and locating the books and online resources on your reading lists.

Make a start with the Bodleian Libraries welcome page, which will introduce you to key facilities and search tools. Next, check out our online guide to the History Faculty Library for further information on the collections and reading rooms in the HFL.

We’re based in the Radcliffe Camera in the centre of Oxford, so we’re easy to find! You can book online for one of our Welcome Tours to learn about using our reading rooms and resources. Alternatively, we also offer a Virtual Welcome Tour of our facilities and services. We have pages tailored to specific subjects and research guides, which can help you identify resources and tools for your study.

For the most up-to-date information on our services, please see the Bodleian Libraries website. If you need any help or have any questions then please drop in or get in touch with us at library.history@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Please note, to continue safeguarding our spaces for readers and staff we are encouraging the use of face masks within the library. Hand sanitiser and cleaning materials are also located throughout the reading rooms.