New: Cambridge Archive Editions: China Political Reports 1911-1960, 1961-1970

Thanks to colleagues in the China Centre Library, Oxford researchers now have access to the Cambridge Archive Editions: China Political Reports 1911-1960, 1961-1970. It can be accessed via SOLO or OxLIP+.

This resource draws together the periodic political and intelligence reports sent by British officials based in China back to the British Foreign Office. The set includes:

  • Annual Reports
  • Personality Reports
  • Occasional Despatches
  • Peking Fortnightly Summaries
  • Peking Observations
  • Shanghai Summaries
  • Occasional Reviews

The reports have been published as an electronic version of the originally 14 printed volumes rather than a database. Therefore the reports are filed chronologically.

At the beginning of each volume there is a detailed contents listing which is helpful to identify the documents included in each particular volume.

Please note that full-text searching is not yet possible!

The first collection, 1911-1960, covers the “history of the rise of Communism in China and its effects over more than half a century. Although the period covers the First and Second World Wars the impact of these world events is almost matched for the Chinese by their internal struggles. After the declaration of the People’s Republic of China, Chinese diplomacy took a more international turn but by then the international arena had become paralysed by the effects of the cold war and the prevailing beliefs of the Great Powers were anti-Communist in nature thereby continuing the isolation of China.” (Eastview, accessed 23/1/18)

The second collection, 1960-71, covers the “recovery from the ‘Great Leap Forward’ and the main thrust of the ‘Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution’ which two events alone would sustain research for years to come but also within this period are the huge foreign relations disputes that grew out of the complications of the cold war.” (Eastview, accessed 23/1/18)

Also of interest:

Trial until 28 February 2018: Punch Historical Archive 1841-1992

Oxford researchers are now invited to trial the online Punch Historical Archive 1841-1992 which is accessible via SOLO (shortly) and OxLIP+.

This resource is the fully text searchable online archive of Punch, or, The London Charivari, a celebrated weekly magazine of humour and satire. It was founded in summer 1841, ceasing publication in 1992. From its early years as a campaigner for social justice to its transformation into national icon, the heavily illustrated Punch played a central role in the formation of British identity – and how the rest of the world saw the British.

It is useful for the study of 19th and 20th century political and social history on key themes such as World War I and World War II; Wars and Conflicts; Colonialism, Imperialism and End of Empire; Impact of New Technology and Modernity; Public Health, Conservation and Environmentalism; Social Change; and The Role of Women. It is worth looking at the Essays and Resource section where a list of case studies showcase the use of Punch as a source material in many different ways.

Yeats, Jack B. “The Airship Menace.” Punch Historical Archive [London, England] 11 Nov. 1914: 389. Punch Historical Archive. Web. 22 Jan. 2018.

The resource includes approx. 7,900 issues as well as almanacs, other special numbers, prefaces, epilogues, indexes and other specially produced material from the bound volumes.

While some adverts are included in the digitised Punch they are not complete as the sets which were used for digitising had largely had the advertising removed. It is worth knowing that the British Library’s set of Punch (shelf mark C.194.b.199, Chairman’s set) includes the original advertising for vol. 1 (Jul.-Dec. 1841) – vol. 277 (Jul.-Dec. 1979); vol. 282 (Jan.-Jun. 1982)- vol. 289 (Jul.-Dec. 1985); Jan.-Dec. 1986 and 1988-1989 (all issues).

Between 1842 and 1899 almanacks were included in Punch, but were issued separately thereafter. Like adverts and special issues, they can be searched separately in Advanced Search.

Images in colour are also reproduced in colour.

Please send feedback to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk by 28 February.

Also of interest

  1. Find the hard copies of Punch, or, The London Charivari in Oxford
  2. Other online availability:
  3. Selected bibliography on the history and reception of Punch:
  4. Useful subject searches in SOLO:

Almanacs, English
English wit and humor
Caricatures and cartoons
Punch (London, England)

Trial until 15 March: ZEDHIA – historical business information from the Austro-Hungarian monarchy and post-war Austria

Oxford researchers are now invited to trial ZEDHIA. The trial can be accessed from OxLIP+.ZEDHIA resource provides historical business information from the Austro-Hungarian monarchy and its successor and partly neighbouring states. This includes the areas of modern Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania and many more until 1945 and more complete information restricted to Austria afterwards. It currently covers 1812 to 2003.

The backbone of the database are the Compass yearbooks covering 1868- 2000 and the Zentralblatt für die Eintragungen ins Handelsregister (commercial register entries) covering 1904-2001. It gives access to depth-structured, digitised, full-text resources in the fields of Central European financial, economic and trade history and genealogy. There is also much information on local villages, town, their geography and population.

Amongst others, the Compass periodical also includes

  • calendars of national and international importance, e.g. solar eclipses, innovations, religious calendars.
  • directories and dates of markets in Germany, Austria, Hungary
  • information on the postal system, e.g. how post is sent from Austria to any part of the world and how much it costs.
  • information on the finances, branches and staffing of the Austrian national bank and other financial institutions
  • information on transport companies (rail, shipping), their finances, staffing and official notices
  • information customs and excise procedures

Zentralblatt für die Eintragungen ins Handelsregister is particularly useful to trace any retail, financial or commercial enterprise and its owner(s).

Also included in ZEDHIA is Der Tresor: Revue, Statistik und Archiv für Volkswirtschaft und Finanzwesen (1872-1919), a weekly periodical which focused on Austro-Hungarian stock companies and government securities. There were regular and highly detailed financial, statistical and economic analyses as well as in-depth reports on economic and political developments in Austria-Hungary and around the world. Der Tresor is also selectively freely available online at ANNO (Austrian Newspaper Online).

As well as finding information relating to business and commerce, the digitised periodicals also include interesting advertisements of banks, businesses, schools, products for industry agriculture or the home, etc.

You can search and browse in many different ways, applying filters to narrow down your search. The interface can be displayed in either German or English though all the content and the metadata describing the publications are in German.

Please send feedback to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk by 15 March 2018.

Trial until 8th February: American Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals Collection

The Vere Harmsworth Library has set up a trial to the full online American Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals Collection. The trial ends Friday 8th February.

The collection provides digital access to the full text of thousands of American periodicals published between 1684 and 1912, digitised from the collections of the American Antiquarian Society. Titles cover a broad range of subjects and interests related to every aspect of American life and culture, from politics to religion, science, law, literature and the arts. >>More information on the AAS periodicals collection.

Access is available via OxLIP+ – use single sign-on for remote access.

Please send comments and feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

[from the VHL Blog post on 9 Jan 2018]

Trials of 3 women’s history eresources – your views count

By Unknown – http://www.hastingspress.co.uk/history/sufpix.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15154048

Oxford researchers are now invited to trial three online resources on the study of women’s history, gender history, suffragette movement and social history in general.

The geographical coverage spans mostly Great Britain, but also former colonies, and, to some extent, the rest of the world.

All resources are relevant for the 19th and 20th centuries.

They can be accessed via SOLO or OxLIP+

Please send any feedback on the content, functionality and usefulness to your research to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. When doing so, also tell me your priorities purchases and explain why. Your views matter!

Archives Direct: Women in the National Archives (until 1 Feb 2018)

Gives access to original documents on the Suffrage Question in Britain, the Empire and Colonial Territories as well as a Finding Aid to Women’s Studies Resources in The National Archives, Kew. The finding aid enables researchers to quickly locate details of documents relating to women in The National Archives at Kew. It is still far more detailed and extensive than anything available elsewhere on the web and has the benefit of ranging across all of the classes held at The National Archives. The original documents will be valuable for those teaching courses on: The Campaign for Women’s Suffrage in Britain, 1903-1928 and The granting of women’s suffrage in Colonial territories, 1930-1962. > More

Nineteenth Century Collections Online: Women: Transnational Networks (until 10 Feb 2018)

Concentrates on issues at the intersection of gender and class — from the late eighteenth century to the era of suffrage in the early twentieth century — through a transnational perspective. This collection deepens the already-comprehensive coverage of European movements included in Nineteenth Century Collections Online by adding sources from the United States and other regions. The focus of this collection is on major nineteenth-century trends, topics, and events as they relate to gender, including social reform, high and low culture, transnational networks, immigration, daily life, religion, and more. > More.
A list of titles in this resource is available.

Women’s Studies Archive: Issues and Identities (until 10 Feb 2018)

Traces the path of women’s issues from past to present, pulling primary sources from manuscripts, newspapers, periodicals. It captures the foundation of women’s movements, struggles and triumphs, focus on the social, political, and professional achievements of women throughout the nineteenth and twentieth century. Topics covered: History of Feminist Theory and Activism; domestic culture; lay and ordained church women; women in industry; women’s sexuality and gender expression; women’s education; women’s movement; women’s health and mental health; women and law; women and the control of their bodies; and women’s roles and interactions within society. > More.
A list of titles in this resource is available.

Newly received History books: South America, Black Tudors, Samurai, the Atlantic World and more

Another week another selection of books recently added to the HFL collection. This week includes a number of books on South American political history alongside titles on the Samurai and Japan, race in Tudor England, and a history of homosexuality in our capital. Click the image below to be taken to a full list of recently aquired items.

Sader, Emir. – Without fear of being happy : Lula, the Workers Party and Brazil (1991 | London : Verso)

O’Shaughnessy, Hugh. – The priest of Paraguay : Fernando Lugo and the making of a nation (2009 | London : Zed)

Kaufmann, Miranda. – Black Tudors : the untold story (2017 | London : Oneworld)

Ikegami, Eiko. – The taming of the samurai : honorific individualism and the making of modern Japan (1995 | Cambridge, Mass ; London : Harvard University Press)

Egerton, Douglas R – The Atlantic world : a history, 1400-1888 (2007 | Wheeling, Ill. : Harlan Davidson)

Ackroyd, Peter. – Queer city : Gay London from the romans to the present day (2017 | London : Chatto & Windus)

There are more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

New LibGuide: Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th – 21st centuries

Newspapers are a wonderful source for historians. They are useful to find out about key events, people and places. They also include opinion pieces, of either writers, editors or members of the public in form of Letters to the Editor. All sorts of ephemera (weather forecasts, court circulars, advertising, sport results, etc.) give insight into daily life. Larger newspapers will also provide battle or war reports, law or court reports and parliamentary reports, including occasional reproductions of full-text speeches.

Finding and using newspapers effectively, however, and navigating your way through large newspaper datasets can be tricky. Help is now at hand!

A new LibGuide Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th – 21st centuries aims to outline which newspaper and news resources, with the emphasis on online availability, are available in Oxford. While we aim to be global in our coverage, some countries or regions will have more newspaper resources than others. We have included all of Oxford’s online subscriptions, covering the 17th to the 21st centuries, and, where possible, provided details of many newspapers on microfilms, print or free on the web. Please note, therefore, that this guide is not a complete catalogue of Oxford’s newspapers.

You can browse by country/ region or by title.

The guide also alerts you to common problems and gives tips how you best construct your searches. For instance, you need to consider in which section of a newspaper you are searching and be careful what search terms to use, especially when searching full-text.

The layout of articles or advertising may also be relevant. Unfortunately many modern newspaper collections have not retained the original formatting. We provide guidance where this is the case:

Finally, we have added resources to help understand newspapers as source materials and suggested further readings.

We hope this guide will be useful to researchers. Feedback is welcome, so email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk if you have any comments, questions or suggestions on historical newspaper resources.

Also useful

More blog posts on newspapers

Trial until 24 December: San Francisco Chronicle, 1865-1984

The Vere Harmsworth Library is running a trial of the San Francisco Chronicle 1865-1984.  Researchers at Oxford are invited to explore it and send any comments or feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

We now have trial access to the San Francisco Chronicle, 1865-1984, via Readex’s America’s Historical Newspapers platform. Access is available via OxLIP+ until 24th December…

Source: Trial until 24 December: San Francisco Chronicle, 1865-1984

Refreshed Oxford Dictionary of National Biography launched

Great news! OUP has refreshed the interface and improved the searching of the much beloved Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB). Although they have continually made improvements to the design and functionality since 2004, it is was time for a more radical overhaul.

The new site has a modern look and feel to it. The home page features a simple search box and a list of featured articles, podcasts, and news via the OUP Twitter feed (@odnb). The real change is much more intuitive searching functionality

The novice ODNB searcher will be more easily guided to construct more complex searches and dig deeper into the resource. If you are used to constructing complex searches in ODNB, then fear not. There are plenty of opportunities to refine or modify your search afterwards. For instance, you can add filters, e.g. by gender, occupation and find articles with images. You can also decide to search full-text or search in other fields, such as place, aristocratic title, contributor, etc.

I also like the reference lists and themed collections which are curated biographies of individuals on a wide range of topics or groups. They are tucked away, a little surprisingly considering how useful they are, but can be found, along with featured essays, in Tools & Resources. These lists reveal the little known geographical reach of the ODNB, covering history beyond Britain as many biographies relate to the British Empire.

Examples from the Reference Group and Reference Lists:

  • Advisers of King John (act. 1215)
  • Salem witches and their accusers (act 1692)
  • Papal legates to medieval Britain and Ireland in the Oxford DNB
  • Competition wallahs (act. 1855-1891)
  • Ministers and secretaries of state for health (1919–2013)
  • Colonial administrators and post-independence leaders in Kenya (1895–2000)
  • Holders of the Faraday medal of the Institute of Electrical Engineers(1922–2013)
  • Principal librarians and directors of the British Museum (1756–2013)

“Masters of the rolls (1286–2013).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 20 Nov. 2017. http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-92826.

The more prominently positioned option to browse by Occupation or by Religious Affiliation is useful. Particularly the latter gives a wonderful insight into important non-British individuals who nonetheless played a significant role in British history.

Search by Religious Affiliation > Hinduism

Once you have found your biography, it is easy to save or share the citation and articles though the list of citations styles (APA, MLA and Chicago) is a little short compared to other resources.

Once you have created a personal profile, you can also save your favourite searches and biographies and add your own notes.

Overall, here is a big thumbs up from me. Happy ODNB searching!

What is the ODNB?

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford DNB) is the national record of men and women who have shaped British history and culture, worldwide, from the Romans to the 21st century.

Also useful:

Find more online biographical resources in OxLIP > Subject > Biographical resources.

Newly received History books: German art and war, white slavery, cultural assimilation and an English master.

Below is a small selection of new books that have been added to our collections in the past fortnight, this week’s selection isn’t themed but does include a varied selection of social, cultural and art history.

Potter, Pamela Maxine, Art of suppression : confronting the Nazi past in histories of the visual and performing arts (University of California Press, 2016)

Hales, Petrescu and Weinstein (eds.), Continuity and crisis in German cinema, 1928-1936 (New York : Camden House, 2016)

Merritt, Keri Leigh, Masterless men : poor whites and slavery in the antebellum South (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Wiese and Wilhelm (eds.) American Jewry : transcending the European experience? (London : Bloomsbury Academic, 2017)

Woods, Gregory, Homintern : how gay culture liberated the modern world (Yale University Press, 2016)

Shanes, Eric, Young Mr Turner : the first forty years, 1775-1815 (Yale University Press, 2016)

 

There are more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.