Trial until 15 February: Early Modern England Society, Culture & Everyday Life, 1500-1700

Oxford researchers are warmly invited to trial Early Modern England: Society, Culture & Everyday Life, 1500-1700 [access via SOLO.]

This resource offers access to rare and invaluable sources for examining the lived experience of people in England between 1500 and 1700. From ‘ordinary’ people through to more prominent individuals and families, these documents show how everyday working, family, religious and administrative life was experienced across England.

Rather than dealing specifically with the great political and religious upheavals of these years, the project aims to look at the everyday happenings of people in different parts of England.

What topics can you research?

The sources are useful for the study of many aspects of life in early modern England. They include:

  • Agriculture
  • Arts, literature and culture
  • Births, marriages and deaths
  • Family life and relationships
  • Finance
  • Foreign affairs
  • Health and medicine
  • Land and property
  • Law and order
  • Monarchy
  • Politics and government
  • Possessions
  • Poverty
  • Religion
  • Scholarship: science and humanities
  • Trade and economics
  • Travel
  • War
  • Women’s history
  • Work and employment

What type of documents are included?

These experiences are revealed through a wide range of materials including legal records, family correspondence, tax records, administrative records, wills, inventories, petitions, military papers and commonplace books and more.

There is a strong material culture element to this project with the inclusion of images of everyday objects used in early modern households. Many can be viewed in 360-degree rotation.3 early modern objects: cream coloured cap, a chamberpot, a fire bellowsWhich regions are covered?

The different collections of documents enable a regional comparison, for example with court records from the South East, London, the West Midlands and the North West.A guide to the different collections incl. Commonplace books, local legal documents, quarter sessions, archives, etc.Searching

You can browse or search in many different ways. Useful are, for instance, indices for names, themes, regions and places.

The resource also offers searching of manuscripts using Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) technology. This is still a developing area and results may not always be perfect.

Tell us what you think

The trial ends on 15 February. While there currently is no funding for this resource, your feedback is still helpful to gauge interest amongst the scholarly community. Please email  isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk to comment on the usefulness of the content, who would benefit from it and whether the searching functionality is adequate.

New Books Display – January 2023

Happy New Year to all returning and new readers! Currently on our New Books Display for the beginning of 2023, you can find a varied selection of the library’s latest additions.

Several of our newest books are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Please click on each title to be taken to its SOLO record.

On Revolution by political theorist Hannah Arendt presents a comparison of the French and American revolutions of the eighteenth century and the impact of these revolutions on our modern world. Underpinning this comparison is an in-depth exploration of the concept of revolution itself, as it has manifested throughout human history.

Next up we have a new English translation of Autumntide of the Middle Ages: A study of forms of life and thought of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in France and the Low Countries by the renowned Dutch historian Johan Huizinga. This influential book is considered a monumental work in its discussion of the ritual, culture, and thought of late medieval society in France and the Netherlands.

Here, There and Everywhere: The Foreign Politics of American Popular Culture is an edited anthology of articles exploring the impact of American popular culture on the wider world. In five sections, 23 authors from around the globe examine the historical background of American culture, the impact of Hollywood, popular music from jazz to rock ‘n’ roll and rap, and the popularity of as well as resistance to American popular culture in particular countries.

These items and many more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link, and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.

New eBooks are also available, several of which are featured below. Click to be taken to the SOLO link.

 

iSkills in Hilary Term: refresher induction, Open Access, Referencing, Online Resources for Historians

The timetable for iSkills workshops in Hilary Term is now available. The following may be of particular interest to Historians:

Bodleian Libraries Refresher Induction  Wednesday 11th Jan (15:00-15:30) – Thursday 12th January (10:30-11:00)  – Friday 13th January (13:30-14:00)

iSkills: Keeping up to date with research (Wed. 8 Feb 1.30-3pm)

iSkills: Online Resources for Historians (Wed. 1 March 2-3.30pm)

Open Scholarship: Fundamentals of Open Access (Tuesday 10th Jan 14:30-15:30)

Open Scholarship: Your thesis, copyright & ORA (Tues 31 Jan. 2.30-3.30pm)

Open Scholarship: Playing in the open: Getting familiar with Creative Commons licences (Thurs 23 Feb 2-3.30pm)

Referencing: Choosing and using software for referencing (Fri 27 Jan. 9.30am-12.30pm)

Referencing: EndNote (Introduction to) (Wed 22 Feb 2-4pm)

Referencing: RefWorks (Wed 15 Feb 10.30am-12pm)

Referencing: Zotero (Tues 21 Feb 10.30-11.30am)

The full list of iSkills workshops can be found on the iSkills webpage.

New Books Display – December 2022

Currently on our New Books Display for the month of December, you can find a varied selection of our newest additions to the library. Several books are featured below, along with a short summary of their contents. Please click to be taken to the SOLO record.

‘Blood, Fire and Gold: The Story of Elizabeth I and Catherine de Medici,’ by Estelle Paranque presents a new look at the two most powerful women of sixteenth-century Europe. Their friendship over the course of thirty years included competition and conflict; drawing on primary sources such as Elizabeth and Catherine’s personal correspondence, this is the first work to examine their complicated relationship in depth.

Also featured is ‘Tudor England: A History,’ by Oxford historian Lucy Wooding. Presenting a new take the Tudors between 1485 and 1603, the books focuses on how political, religious, and economic upheavals during the Tudor dynasty affected the lives of the general populace of England, particularly those who were not of the nobility, a side of Tudor England that has often been overlooked.

‘Misinformation Nation: Foreign News and the Politics of Truth in Revolutionary America,’ by Jordan E. Taylor, associate professor of history at Indiana University Bloomington, outlines how increasing consumption of foreign newspapers had a huge impact on the early colonists’ decision to revolt against British rule and create a new nation. News powered early American politics, but newspaper printers had few reliable sources to report on events from abroad. Information regarding battles, declarations and constitutions was often contradictory and unreliable, but shaped the people’s sense of reality. The books presents a striking and original argument about the early years of the United States.

‘East Asia and the First World War’ by Frank Jacob of Norway University examines how the First World War in East Asia facilitated the further rise of Japan as the leading power in the region, as well as contributing to radical social upheaval after the war concluded. In China and Korea, the effects of the First World War led to the growth of nationalistic movements, seeking freedom and equality for the people living within their semi-colonized borders. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the First World War and its impact on East Asia.

These items and more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link, and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.

 

Disability History Hackathon, or…How to crowdsource over 200 websites!

To mark Disability History month, 24 volunteers assembled in the History Faculty on a cold and grey last day of term with an additional 12 joining the event via Teams. The mission? To find quality websites for a Bodleian Libraries’ guide on disability history resources. Prof Rob Iliffe opened the event by thanking all for contributing to the Faculty’s commitment to foster teaching and research in disability history.

Photo shows a tiered lecture theatre with participants looking towards the speaker.

Photo by Rachel D’Arcy Brown

After lunch and a handy crash course on advanced Google searching by Bethan Jenkins, students, researchers, librarians, and staff from the University’s Disability Advisory Service (DAS) settled down with their laptops to surf the web. Individuals were given broad topics to focus on. In just under two hours, an astonishing 226 resources were recorded, covering all periods and forms of disability. This is a fantastic achievement by the volunteer hackers and more than we could have hoped for.

The History Faculty Library trainee, Alice Shepherd, will next design a user-friendly version of the guide and add helpful contextual information. When completed at some point in 2023, the guide will be open to anybody in the world who is interested in disability history and looking for research resources. Watch this space!

Photo shows a laptop on a table in the History Fculty Common Room

Photo by Helen Young

As an event format, this jointly organised hybrid hackathon was a great success and will be a template for similar initiatives in the future. It used an inclusive, accessible, and collaborative approach to crowdsource quality resources for research and the public good. And it was fun! There may have been cake in between and drinks at the end for the survivors….

The effort to collate quality resources has not stopped. Individuals wishing to nominate a resource for the disability history guide are warmly invited to do so, using the input form at https://oxford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/disability-history-hackathon-input-form.

Our thanks and gratitude also go to the History Faculty and their staff for supporting the event in many ways, and to all the library and DAS staff who helped with the organisation and delivery of the event.

Dr Sloan Mahone, History Faculty & Isabel Holowaty, Bodleian Libraries

New Books Display – November 2022

Currently on our New Books Display, you can find a varied selection of our newest additions to the library.
Some items of note include ‘Horizons: A Global History of Science,’ in which author James Poskett traces the development of modern science from 1450 onwards, with particular focus on non-European contexts and contributions. The book has been praised for presenting a wide-ranging and comprehensive demonstration of the global exchange that led to the development and breakthroughs of science as we continue to understand it today.
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We also have ‘Ireland and the Crusades,’ by Edward Coleman, Paul Duffy and Tadhg O’Keefe. This book takes a comprehensive look, based on new research, that demonstrates a more nuanced picture of Ireland’s often overlooked role in the crusading period.
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Finally, we have ‘Peasants Making History’ by Christopher Dyer, which offers a new look at the lives and contributions of people of lower socio-economic status (for example, in the development of urbanised areas, trading, and religion) in the medieval English midlands.
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These items and more can be found on the display located in the Upper Gladstone Link and can be checked out at the Lower Camera Circulation Desk.
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New eBooks are also available, several of which are featured below. These can be accessed online once you are logged onto your SOLO account. Please click to go to the SOLO record.
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Winter Vacation Loans

Winter vacation loans begin on Monday 28th November. Loan limits increase to 20 books on Thursday 1st December and will include Short Loans. Everything will be due back on Monday 16th January (1st Week Hilary Term).

Don’t forget you can access many of our resources electronically. With your Single Sign On, you can make use of all our ebookejournal and database subscriptions while away from Oxford via SOLO.

Camera staff would like to wish you all a Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year!

UK Disability History Month 2022

To mark UK Disability History Month, from 16th November to 16th December, we have highlighted some of our collections in order to create a display focusing on the history of mental health.

In addition to the books on our display we also have a selection of e-books exploring the topic, which can be read remotely. Click on the book covers below to access their SOLO records. You’ll just need to sign in using your Single Sign On (SSO).

If you’re interested in further investigating disability in research and teaching, Wadham College are offering a free Cross-College Curriculum Diversity Workshop on the 4th November. See here for more details.

To find out more about UK Disability History Month please visit their dedicated website here.

Black History Month 2022

To mark Black History Month, from 1st to 31st October, we have created a display from our collections focusing on contemporary discourses surrounding issues of imperialism, discrimination, and experiences of systemic racism.

As well as physical books we also have a variety of e-books which explore these issues. The following e-books are available online for Oxford University members to read remotely – just make sure you sign into SOLO with your ‘Single Sign On’ first. Click on the book covers below to access their SOLO records.

Throughout October the University will be hosting a series of exhibitions and lectures for Black History Month. See here for more details.

For more information about Black History Month 2022 please visit the dedicated website here.