British History Online and the Bibliography of British and Irish History – not just British

Read this great blogpost from the Institute of Historical Research on the global coverage of British History Online and the Bibliography of British and Irish History.

They are wonderful resources and easy to use. Take a look now!

From the titles of some of the IHR’s digital resources, you might think that they have limited geographical reach: British History Online…the Bibliography of British and Irish History. …

Source: British History Online and the Bibliography of British and Irish History – not just British

Trial until 31 January 2018: The Chicago Manual of Style Online (17th ed.)

Oxford researchers and students are now invited to trial the online version of Chicago Manual of Style Online (17th ed.). It is available via SOLO or OxLIP+.First published in 1906 by Chicago University Press, the Chicago Style Manual’s Notes and Bibliographies system is one of the most widely used citation styles in the Humanities. Its Author-Date system is more commonly used in the Sciences and Social Sciences.

The online edition of this authoritative reference work is full-text searchable. It also includes the 16th edition and be read and browsed as a book. The content covers the publishing process, style and usage, and source citations and indexes. When reading the Chapter 4 (Rights, Permissions, and Copyright Administration) please remember that it will refer to the US copyright regulations. A quick guide is available as are Q&As and video tutorials.

Please send feedback to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Also useful:

Term borrowing has started!

Welcome back everyone to a new academic year! And a special welcome to our new undergraduates and graduates. For those of you have had books out for the vacation the term limit has reverted to a maximum of 15 items. If you have more than 15 books out and you want to take out additional items you will need to bring some back.

You are reminded that vacation loans are due back on Monday 9th October. Please don’t forget!

From now on undergraduates can check out books for 7 days and research graduates for 28 days.

Do enjoy your studies and we hope to see you all in the library soon.

Library tours for freshers and new graduates

Simon-Bentley-6.jpg (3277×2269)

Come and meet library staff and take the chance to familiarise yourself with the library at the start of your studies.  We will be organising separate tours for new undergraduates and postgraduates during 0th week and beyond.

Undergraduate Radcliffe Camera and History Faculty Library orientation tour [booking not required, just turn up, 10 max per tour]

0th Week
Weds 4 Oct: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm
Thurs 5 Oct: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm
Fri 6 Oct: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm

1st Week
Mon 09 Oct: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm
Tues 10 Oct: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm

Library staff will take new undergraduates around the Radcliffe Camera showing you where things are located and enabling you to use the library with ease.

Treasure Hunts: complete the optional library quiz at the end to be entered into our freshers’ prize draw for a KeepCup! Several KeepCups to be won.

Students will need to bring their university card to enter the library.

Location: Meet Reception, Radcliffe Camera.

Postgraduate Bodleian and History Faculty Library orientation tour [booking required]

Mon 2 Oct: 2.00-3.00pm
Thurs 5 Oct: 9.30-10.30am
Fri 6 Oct: 9.30-10.30am
Mon 09 Oct: 2.00-3.00pm
Tues 10 Oct: 2.00-3.00pm
Wed 11 Oct: 2.00-3.00pm
Thurs 12 Oct: 2.00-3.00pm
Fri 13 Oct: 2.00-3.00pm

Not sure how to find your way round the Bodleian Library, Gladstone Link and History Faculty Library (HFL) and which facilities are available? Join the History Librarian for a 60min orientation tour of the central Bodleian Library site, including the Radcliffe Camera where the HFL is located, and briefly enter the Weston Library which is relevant for Special Collections and African & Oriental studies.

Students will need to bring their university card to enter the Library.

Location: Meet Proscholium, Old Bodleian

Book now (via the HFL WebLearn Sign-up at https://weblearn.ox.ac.uk/x/BTj2oJ – SSO required)

Tour leader: Isabel Holowaty

Max nos of students: 10

New: 17th and 18th Century Nichols Newspapers Collection

I am pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have access to the online 17th and 18th Century Nichols Newspapers Collection via SOLO or OxLIP+.

A collection of late 16th and early 17th century newspapers, pamphlets and broadsheets, the Nichols newspaper collection is held at the Bodleian Library and was bought by the library from the Nichols family in 1865. It comprises 296 volumes of bound material. In partnership with the Bodleian Library, Gale scanned the original physical copies to produce this online resource.

Burney and Nichols

The two biggest collections of 17th- and 18th-century newspapers were owned by Dr. Charles Burney and his fellow collector, John Nichols. The Nichols Newspaper Collection contains titles that are not in the Burney Collection and fill gaps from title runs in Burney. Having access, therefore, to both the 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers and the 17th and 18th Century Nichols Newspapers Collection is wonderful news for early modernists studying British history, politics, society, culture and also international relations in this period.

Using Gale Primary Sources you can search across both Burney and Nichols newspaper collections simultaneously.

Content of the Nichols Newspapers Collection

The resource, covering the period 1672 to 1737, includes approximately 300 primary titles of newspapers and periodicals and 300 pamphlets and broadsheets.

Examples of some interesting newspapers include Athenian Mercury (1691-1697), The Flying Post (1695-1733), The Post Boy (1695-1728) and many more. It also includes all four issues of The Ladies Mercury, an early example of a periodical aimed at women, and The Female Tatler, the first known periodical with a female editor.

The Female Tatler [A. Baldwin] (London, England), March 24, 1710, Issue 109. Gale.

How to use and search the Nichols Newspapers Collection

Advanced searches include limiting to type of content, year, etc. As ever when searching full-text in early modern newspaper resources, the use of language has to be carefully considered. The resource does allow you to search for variations in spelling. Reading the Help > Search section is highly recommended. Proximity searching doesn’t seem to be available, to the best my knowledge. Researchers can browse by publication title or date.

The resource comes with introductory essays and resources:

  • ‘A Copious Collection of Newspapers’: John Nichols and his Collection of Newspapers, Pamphlets and News Sheets, 1760–1865 (Julian Pooley, University of Leicester)
  • The English Press in the Long Eighteenth Century: An Introduction, Change Amidst Continuity (Professor Jeremy Black, University of Exeter)
  • London Newspapers and Domestic Politics in the Early Eighteenth Century (Professor Hannah Barker, University of Manchester)
  • Advertising Novels in the Early Eighteenth-century Newspaper: Some examples from the Bodleian’s Nichols collection. (Dr Siv Gøril Brandtzæg, University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim)
  • Dealing with the ‘Fair Sex’: Women and the Periodical Press in the Nichols Collection (Claire Boulard Jouslin, Université Paris3-Sorbonne Nouvelle)
  • The Nichols Collection, 1666–1737: Religion, Regulation and the Development of the Metropolitan Press (Daniel Reed, Oxford Brookes University)

Finally, it also includes a tool which analyses the frequency or popularly of terms in the digitised documents (Term Frequency). While the visualisation of term frequency is exciting and linking relevant documents is incredibly useful, any post-1737 results should be ignored as, of course, there are no Nichols newspapers after that year:

John Nichols (1745-1826)

John Nichols was a writer, printer, former Master of the Stationers’ Company and biographer of Hogarth (Biographical anecdotes of William Hogarth, 1781) and local history enthusiast (The history and antiquities of the county of Leicester, 4 vols., 1795-1815) . An enthusiastic collector and antiquarian, he began collecting newspapers from c 1778, when in June that year he purchased a share in the Gentleman’s Magazine, becoming sole printer from 1780.

Learn more about him and his family:

More early modern resources

New: The Grand Tour

I am pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have access to The Grand Tour (Adam Matthew Digital). Use your SSO for remote access.

As thousands of British tourists are currently enjoying their holidays in Europe, no doubt Facebooking and Instagramming their experiences and sights, it is worth reflecting back how travel accounts used to be written and at a time when European travel was reserved to the aristocratic and wealthy young men of the eighteenth century and seen as part of their education.

The Grand Tour, a term first used by J. Gailhard, The compleat gentleman, or, Directions for the education of youth as to their breeding at home and travelling abroad (1678)*, was a phenomenon which shaped the creative and intellectual sensibilities of some of the eighteenth century’s greatest artists, writers and thinkers. Now researchers have access to digitised accounts of the English abroad in Europe c1550-1850.

The source materials in The Grand Tour highlight the influence of continental travel on British art, architecture, urban planning, literature and philosophy. They are also useful for the study of daily life in the eighteenth century, whether it be on transportation, communications, money, social norms, health, sex or food and drink. Furthermore, the material covers European political and religious life, British diplomacy; life at court, and social customs on the Continent, and is an excellent resource for the study of Europe’s urban spaces. This resource will be useful for those studying history, history of art and architecture, British and European literature.

There is a wealth of detail about cities such as Paris, Rome, Florence and Geneva, including written accounts and visual representations of street life, architecture and urban planning.

What is included?

The Grand Tour provides full-text access to a curated collection of manuscripts, printed works and visual resources. The materials draw on collections held in a number of libraries and archives, including many in private or neglected collections. Assembling these in a single resource will allow researchers for the first time to better compare the sources.

In particular the scanned and indexed materials include letters; diaries and journals; account books; printed guidebooks; published travel writing; but also visual resources such as paintings and sketches; architectural drawings and maps. Palaeographical skills are needed to decipher manuscript letters. Some images of scanned manuscripts are challenging to read.

Using an interactive map, researchers can also locate any sources related to a town or city:

Also included is an online version of John Ingamells (comp.), Dictionary and Archive of Travellers in Italy 1701-1800 (New Haven, 1997). This well-known publication lists over 6,000 individual Grand Tourists, provides biographical details and details of their tours.

For those needing an introductory and historiographical account of Grand Tour research, there are essays by Professors Jeremy Black, Edward Chaney and Rosemary Sweet.

Other supplementary aids include a chronology of 18th century European events, a political chronology of Italy, and a list of Italian rulers, as well as a selected bibliography for further reading.

The Grand Tour is accessible to Oxford researchers and Bodleian-registered readers via SOLO or OxLIP+.

Also useful

ANSELL, Richard, Foubert’s academy : British and Irish elite formation in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Paris and London, in Beyond the Grand Tour : Northern metropolises and early modern travel behaviour; edited by Rosemary Sweet, Gerrit Verhoeven and Sarah Goldsmith. (London: Routledge, 2017)

GOLDSMITH, Sarah, Dogs, Servants and Masculinities : Writing about Danger on the Grand Tour, in Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 40:1 (2017) 3-21, DOI: 10.1111/1754-0208.12342.

*Oxford English Dictionary, http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/80717, accessed 17 August 2017

Phone upgrade Tuesday 15 August 2017

The University’s new telephone service, Chorus, will be installed in the Radcliffe Camera and Gladstone Link on the afternoon of Tuesday 15th August. This will involve changing handsets and will cause little disruption. Our main phone line may be offline for a short time in the afternoon.

If you receive no response from 01865(2)77262 please try 01865(2)77200 on the afternoon of Tuesday 15th August only. 

New: The Waterloo Directories of English, Irish and Scottish Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (series 3)

Oxford researchers working on Victorian periodical literature may have noticed the recent absence of our access to Waterloo Directory of English Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (Oxford researchers only).

 

I am very pleased report that access to a more updated online version (series 3) is now available to our readers via OxLIP+ and also via SOLO shortly.

Furthermore, you will now also have online access to The Waterloo Directory of Irish Newspapers and Periodicals:1800-1900 (series 3) and The Waterloo Directory of Scottish Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (series 3).

Please note these doesn’t work well with Internet Explorer (IE).

All three resources are an alphabetical listing and description of 19th century newspaper and periodical publications in England, Scotland and Ireland covering all fields, including the arts, sciences, culture, professions, industry, finance, trades, labour, agriculture, entertainment, sports, church, women and children.

Between them, the directories include approximately 86,000 titles from 4,600 towns, lists 85,000 personal names and covers over 2,000 subjects.

As well as being an ongoing project to record the bibliographic record of Victorian periodical publications, tracking innumerable title changes for instance, it is indispensable for those studying the all-important context of periodical literature during an important historical period.

Each entry provides details of how and where the title is indexed, title changes, editor, proprietor/publisher/printer, key contributors, political and religious orientation, size, price, circulation, and frequency. It is therefore a useful resource to discover the editorial policy and political leanings of newspapers.

There is some overlap between the three directories, especially where a periodical was issued from multiple or different locations in the course of time.

The resource can be searched by title, issuing body, people, town, county, and subject as well as combine searches in advanced searching or doing a global searching.

It is currently not possible to search across all three Directories.

Also useful:

Camera & GLadstone Link returned to normal opening – open until 7pm

The installation of new contactless card readers at the entrance/exit gates of the Radcliffe Camera has been completed ahead of schedule and we have now resumed normal opening. The Camera front door is in operation again and we will not be closing at 5pm as previously advertised but will remain open until 7pm.

*The Camera and the Gladstone Link will be open until 7pm today.*

The card readers are the same style as those in the Weston Library and we hope they are easier to use than the former swipe card readers. Thank you for your patience and apologies for the inconvenience caused by the work.

 

HFL open 9-5pm on Tues 18 to Thurs 20 July 2017

The Radcliffe Camera and Gladstone Link will be open from 9am-5pm only on Tuesday 18th to Thursday 20th July inclusive. This is a change to our advertised opening hours – the Old Bodleian Library is open until 7pm as normal.

This is to facilitate the installation of new contactless card readers at the entrance/exit gates in the Bodleian Library as part of essential maintenance works. If work finishes ahead of schedule we will resume normal access arrangments/opening hours.

Access to the Camera and Gladstone Link will be via the main entrance to the Old Bodleian Library and the tunnel. From 9am to 4:45pm we aim to offer a normal service but there will be no access to collections after 5pm. Readers can take books and continue to work in the Old Bodleian Library until 7pm.

The card readers are the same style as the ones in the Weston Library (see image above) and we hope that they will be easier to use than the current swipe card readers. Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience the work may cause.