New: The Grand Tour

I am pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have access to The Grand Tour (Adam Matthew Digital). Use your SSO for remote access.

As thousands of British tourists are currently enjoying their holidays in Europe, no doubt Facebooking and Instagramming their experiences and sights, it is worth reflecting back how travel accounts used to be written and at a time when European travel was reserved to the aristocratic and wealthy young men of the eighteenth century and seen as part of their education.

The Grand Tour, a term first used by J. Gailhard, The compleat gentleman, or, Directions for the education of youth as to their breeding at home and travelling abroad (1678)*, was a phenomenon which shaped the creative and intellectual sensibilities of some of the eighteenth century’s greatest artists, writers and thinkers. Now researchers have access to digitised accounts of the English abroad in Europe c1550-1850.

The source materials in The Grand Tour highlight the influence of continental travel on British art, architecture, urban planning, literature and philosophy. They are also useful for the study of daily life in the eighteenth century, whether it be on transportation, communications, money, social norms, health, sex or food and drink. Furthermore, the material covers European political and religious life, British diplomacy; life at court, and social customs on the Continent, and is an excellent resource for the study of Europe’s urban spaces. This resource will be useful for those studying history, history of art and architecture, British and European literature.

There is a wealth of detail about cities such as Paris, Rome, Florence and Geneva, including written accounts and visual representations of street life, architecture and urban planning.

What is included?

The Grand Tour provides full-text access to a curated collection of manuscripts, printed works and visual resources. The materials draw on collections held in a number of libraries and archives, including many in private or neglected collections. Assembling these in a single resource will allow researchers for the first time to better compare the sources.

In particular the scanned and indexed materials include letters; diaries and journals; account books; printed guidebooks; published travel writing; but also visual resources such as paintings and sketches; architectural drawings and maps. Palaeographical skills are needed to decipher manuscript letters. Some images of scanned manuscripts are challenging to read.

Using an interactive map, researchers can also locate any sources related to a town or city:

Also included is an online version of John Ingamells (comp.), Dictionary and Archive of Travellers in Italy 1701-1800 (New Haven, 1997). This well-known publication lists over 6,000 individual Grand Tourists, provides biographical details and details of their tours.

For those needing an introductory and historiographical account of Grand Tour research, there are essays by Professors Jeremy Black, Edward Chaney and Rosemary Sweet.

Other supplementary aids include a chronology of 18th century European events, a political chronology of Italy, and a list of Italian rulers, as well as a selected bibliography for further reading.

The Grand Tour is accessible to Oxford researchers and Bodleian-registered readers via SOLO or OxLIP+.

Also useful

ANSELL, Richard, Foubert’s academy : British and Irish elite formation in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Paris and London, in Beyond the Grand Tour : Northern metropolises and early modern travel behaviour; edited by Rosemary Sweet, Gerrit Verhoeven and Sarah Goldsmith. (London: Routledge, 2017)

GOLDSMITH, Sarah, Dogs, Servants and Masculinities : Writing about Danger on the Grand Tour, in Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 40:1 (2017) 3-21, DOI: 10.1111/1754-0208.12342.

*Oxford English Dictionary, http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/80717, accessed 17 August 2017

New: Records relating to the slave trade at the Liverpool Record Office

I am pleased to report that Oxford users now access to the online Records relating to the slave trade at the Liverpool Record Office (British Online Archives: British Records on the Atlantic World, 1700-1900) via SOLO and OxLIP+.

Records relating to the slave trade at the Liverpool Record Office - pamphlet

This full-text database provides access to one of the best collections in British archives of private merchants’ papers relating to the transatlantic slave trade.

Liverpool was the leading slave trading port in the world in the eighteenth century when these documents were compiled.

 

The material includes

  • correspondence with ship captains and Caribbean agents about the acquisition of Africans and their sale; statistics on the Liverpool slave trade
  • sales accounts of the lots of Africans disembarked in the Americas, often with the names of purchasers and prices; information on dealings with diverse African groups along the coast of West Africa; and details of payments for slave sales.
  • account books of ships’ voyages with material on the outfitting of vessels and the cargoes of goods exported to Africa.
  • Records of the wealthy merchant and banker, Thomas Leyland (c.1752-1827), who was three times Mayor of Liverpool.
  • Letters by the slave trade captain, John Newton (1725-1807), who later became a clergyman, the composer of the hymn ‘Amazing Grace’, and a prominent abolitionist.

Other useful resources

Enjoy! If you have any problems, please contact library staff.

Electronic Enlightenment Colloquium on the Sociology of the Letter

Enlightenment Correspondence: letter-writing and reading in the 18th century

A colloquium on the sociology of the letter, exploring the links between correspondence and publishing in the 18th century presented by the Electronic Enlightenment Project and the Bodleian Library Centre for the Study of the Book.

St Anne’s College, Oxford

Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre

Saturday, 13 November, 2010

9.30 am – 5 pm

Keynote speaker James Raven (University of Essex)

Speakers include:

Caroline Warman (University of Oxford), Isabelle de Charriere: from real to fictional correspondences

Rebecca Ford (University of Nottingham), Reading Bernardin de Saint-Pierre: between letter and text

Susan Whyman, Publishing correspondence: letters in private collections and published forms

Isabelle de Marte (Lewis and Clark College), Lettering in the open: when private turns public – Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot

Mike Webb (Bodleian Library), Finding 18th century correspondence: collections, catalogues and context

Registration in advance is required: email bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk

Registration fee £10/£5 student, includes lunch and refreshments.

For more information and a full programme see: http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/csb/enlightenment.htm

Electronic Enlightenment version 2 launched

“Electronic Enlightenment reconstructs the extraordinary and vital web of correspondence that made the long 18th century the birth place of the modern world.”  With over 55,000 letters and 6,500 correspondents it is more than an electronic archive of printed sources but presents a searchable network of interconnected documents.

The new release features a new content, functionality and a new look:

New content:

  • the correspondence of the Swedish king Gustavus III, from the edition of Gustave III par ses lettres published by Norstedts Förlag of Stockholm.
  • Unpublished Adam Smith letters

New functionality: and ability to do more complex and powerful searches.

New options for letters include searching by:

  • language (11 languages to choose from);
  • age of writer or recipient (from 4 to 99);
  • date range of letters.

New options for lives include searching by:

  • occupation (nearly 700 occupations);
  • nationality (40 nationalities);
  • birth & death information.

New options for sources include searching by:

  • archive & country of manuscript (over 500 archives in 30 countries);
  • title & publisher of early printed editions.

New browse options include browsing:

  • all lives by occupation;
  • all lives by nationality;
  • all source editions by main author;
  • all source editions by publisher.

New look: The clear, intuitive design makes it easier to find your way round the site and underlines the wealth of information and the network of links between documents and people, times and places.

Oxford users can access EE via OxLIP+.