New: Migration to New Worlds

I am pleased to report that Oxford historians now have access to Adam Matthew’s Migration to New Worlds. Following a collaboration between Jisc and Adam Matthew this resource is made freely available to all UK academics and students in higher (HE) and further (FE) education institutions from January 2016.

Migration to New Worlds documents the emigration of peoples to the United States, Canada and Australasia during the period 1800 to 1924, although there are documents from the eighteenth century and also later materials.

Mainly focusing on European emigration, the resource includes material on English, Scandinavian, Irish, Italian, Jewish, Polish and Scottish experiences along with a wealth of material covering Chinese and Japanese movement to the United States.

The majority of the collection comprises unique manuscript correspondence, diaries and travel journals, providing eye-witness accounts and experiences of emigrants across the World. It is also rich in visual content.

Topics covered include: motives for emigration; assisted migration schemes; social conditions and organisation in ports of emigration; ships and shipping lines involved in emigration; government legislation for emigration and immigration; settlement, naturalisation and choice of location; maintaining identities.

This collection of primary sources provides an important and multi-faceted resource for students, teachers and researchers from a diverse range of academic disciplines, including migration studies, history, sociology, law, economics and postcolonial studies.

Migration to New Worlds is now available via SOLO and Databases A-Z.

Watch a webinar on this resource:

Related resources on the web:

Ancestry.com freely available in Oxford Central Library

If any Oxford historians would like free access to Ancestry.com, then you might like to know that the Oxford Central Library, nr Westgate Centre, provides access to Ancestry Library Edition – as do many other public libraries across the UK.

The Family and Local History section on the top level of the Central Library has 4-5 PCs where you can access Ancestry Library Edition. Please note that you can’t open an Ancestry personal account for the purposes of creating family trees. You can print from a PC or save to memory stick.

Ancestry.com is particularly useful for family and genealogical research, esp. British, North American and Australian. You can trace a family tree using the largest site online including the UK Census from 1841; birth, marriage and death records; parish and probate records. Here is a listing topics and sources:

Birth, Marriage & Death
Birth, Baptism & Christening
Marriage & Divorce
Death, Burial, Cemetery & Obituaries

Census & Voter Lists
UK Census Collection
U.S. Federal Census Collection
Canadian Census Collection

Immigration & Travel
Passenger Lists
Citizenship & Naturalization Records
Border Crossings & Passports

Military
Draft, Enlistment and Service
Casualties
Soldier, Veteran & Prisoner Rolls & Lists

Schools, Directories & Church Histories
City & Area Directories
Professional & Organizational Directories
Church Histories & Records

Tax, Criminal, Land & Wills
Land Records
Tax Lists
Court, Governmental & Criminal Records

Other useful resources

FamilySearch

Top 100 Most Popular Genealogy Websites

Medieval English Genealogy

Familiennamenbuch der Schweiz

Genealogische Datenbank Familie Beuss

and more from HFL Delicious: census websites, genealogy websites. If you want to make suggestions of other genealogy or census websites for bookmarking, please email Isabel Holowaty.