New OA journal: Medieval Worlds, 1 (2015)-

Medieval Worlds (ISSN: 2412-3196) is an Open Access double‐blind peer reviewed journal open accesscovering interdisciplinary and transcultural studies of the Middle Ages. It is published semi-annually the Austrian Academy of Science (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (ÖAW)) and is licensed under the Creative‐Commons‐Attribution NonCommercial‐NoDerivs 4.0 Unported (CC BY‐NC‐ND 4.0).

The journal “encourages and links comparative research between different regions and fields and promotes methodological innovation in transdisciplinary studies. Focusing on the Middle Ages (c. 400 ‐ 1500 CE, but can be extended whenever thematically fruitful or appropriate) medieval worlds takes a global approach to studying history in a comparative setting.

Building upon studies of transcultural relations and processes of cultural hybridization between cultures, both of which have seen dynamic developments in recent years, the main approach chosen by medieval worlds is comparative. Taking such a comparative approach will not only allow researchers to highlight the global interaction within, or hybrid nature of particular cultural spheres, but also shed new light on more specific fields of interest. Moreover, medieval worlds will encourage a critical debate between the disciplines concerning approaches and methods, and thus will help to enrich the methodological frameworks of comparative history.” From http://www.medievalworlds.net/medieval_worlds, accessed 13 Sept 2016.

This journal will be soon added to SOLO and OU eJournals.

New: Studies in Church History, v. 46 (2010) to current issue, is now online

Studies in Church History - coverBusy Oxford historians and theologians working on Christian church history will be pleased to know that Studies in Church History (ISSN 0424-2084) is now available online from volume 46 (2010) via SOLO (very shortly) and OU eJournals. For older volumes, please search SOLO to find the printed copies.

With v. 52 (2016) Cambridge University Press has taken over the publication of this annually published series which include selected themed papers and communications of the Ecclesiastical History Society‘s conferences.

“These volumes endeavour to explore a theme (chosen by the president for the year), providing a snapshot of current scholarship on a particular aspect of church history. Essays may focus on issues of detail, or take a broad perspective. They should be a helpful starting point for the student approaching particular issues in the history of Christianity, and are often of interest to those working in other disciplines. Each volume comprises around thirty essays, ranging widely throughout Christian history.” from http://www.history.ac.uk/ehsoc/studies-in-church-history, accessed 21 July 2016

If you want to keep up with this series, just set up a Content Alert with Cambridge Journals.

Past themes of Studies in Church History:

  • Doubting Christianity: the Church and Doubt (v. 52)
  • Christianity and Religious Plurality (v. 51)
  • Religion and the Household (v. 50)
  • The Church on its Past (v. 49)
  • The Church and Literature (v. 48)
  • Saints and Sanctity (v. 47)
  • God’s Bounty: The Churches and the Natural World (v. 46)

etc.

Also of interest:

Ecclesiastical History Society Summer Conference 2016: The Church and Empire
University of Edinburgh, 26-28 July 2016

New: Parliaments, Estates and Representation – e-access to content for 1981-1996

I am pleased to report that Oxford users now also have access to the entire backfiles of Parliaments, Parliaments estates and representations - coverEstates and Representation, meaning you have complete access from vol. 1 (1981) to the current issue via SOLO and OU eJournals and don’t need to order up issues from the Book Storage Facility in Swindon.

ISSN 0260-6755 (Print), 1947-248X (Online)

Published twice a year, Parliaments, Estates and Representation “is the journal of the International Commission for the History of Representative and Parliamentary Institutions (ICHRPI) – Commission internationale pour l’histoire des Assemblees d’Etats (CIHAE). The aims of the journal, as of the Commission, are to promote research into the origin, growth and development of representative and parliamentary institutions throughout the world in all periods. In particular, it encourages the study of the development of representative institutions in a wide and comparative way. It facilitates the international exchange of bibliographical information. It is concerned with the political theory and institutional practice of representation as well as with the internal organization, political culture and the social and political background to parliaments and assemblies of estates. Representative urban institutions and international parliamentary organizations also fall within its remit. The journal publishes scholarly articles covering the whole spectrum of the history of representative institutions up to the present day.

The journal welcomes all contributions which fall within its field of interest, including papers presented at conferences of the ICHRPI. Articles may be submitted in English, French or German.” http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/journal/parliaments-estates-and-representation, accessed 18 July 2016.

To keep up with the journal’s publications, you can set up a New Content alert or RSS feed.

Also of interest?

More news on History journals and eHistory ejournals.

New: Journal for the History of Environment and Society, 1, 2016-

JHES coverThe new Journal for the History of Environment and Society, 1, 2016- (ISSN 2506-6730) is now listed on SOLO and OU eJournals but is of course freely available at http://www.brepolsonline.net/loi/jhes.

open accessThis is a double-blind peer-review Open Access journal, distributed by Brepols.

It “aims to be a leading on-line and open-access magazine that covers various aspects of environmental history in the broadest sense of the word. Emphasis is upon studies which focus on the historical relations between environmental changes and the social-historical context. Interregional and international comparative articles are getting special attention.

Geographically, the journal is primarily – but not exclusively – focusing on NW-Europe including areas that had historical relations with that broad region. Articles with a more general geographic scope can also be published in the Journal.”

See http://jheswebsite.com/mission.html for more details.

You can set up Table of Content (ToC) alerts and RSS feeds provided by Brepols.

Content of Vol. 1 (2016)

  • Maïka De Keyzer, All we are is dust in the wind: The social causes of a “subculture of coping” in the late medieval covers and belt
  • Ivan Hoste, Denis Diagre-Vanderpelen, Belgian botany in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: from plant hunting to nascent nature conservation
  • Peder Roberts, Dolly Jørgensen, Animals as instruments of Norwegian imperial authority in the interwar Arctic
  • Frank Uekötter, City meets Country: Recycling ideas and realities on German sewage farms

New: e-access to Publications du Centre Européen d’Etudes Bourguignonnes v.2 (1960) – current

Stressed medievalists now don’t have to come to the library to research late medieval and early Renaissance Burgundy history.

Publications du Centre Européen d'Etudes Bourguignonnes - coverI am delighted to announce that our readers have electronic access to the Publications du Centre Européen d’Etudes Bourguignonnes [ISSN 1016-4286] covering v. 2 (1960) – current. It will be added to SOLO shortly, but you can already access it via OU eJournals.

PCEEB is most relevant to those studying the late medieval and early Renaissance period in France and of course especially Burgundy, its history and relations to other medieval power houses:

“For nearly fifty years, the Centre européen d’études bourguignonnnes (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) – known until 1984 as the Centre européen d’études burgondo-médianes – has published annually the acts of the scholarly meetings it organizes in cities within the territory covered by its activities. Its objectives, as stated explicitly in its statutes, are the promotion, the encouragement, and the coordination of historical studies relating to the period of the Dukes of Burgundy of the house of Valois and of the first Hapsburgs, between the North Sea, the Rhine-Danube river system, and the Mediterranean. The themes of these meetings relate to different aspects of the past of these lands, with particular emphasis on the political, economic, cultural and spiritual links that existed between them. Because of their international and multilingual nature (French, German, English and Italian), the volumes of the collection hold a position of choice in the bibliography of studies devoted to this historical period which marks the transition between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in the Western world.” http://www.brepols.net/Pages/BrowseBySeries.aspx?TreeSeries=PCEEB, accessed 16 June 2016

Keep up-to-date with this journal

You can set up Table of Content alerts and RSS feeds for this.

New: e-access to Mediaeval Studies (Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies) 1939-2006

Mediaeval Studies (PIMS) coverOxford medievalists now have electronic access to the backfile issues of another key medieval journal, Mediaeval Studies (Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, ISSN 0076-5872).

The backfiles include vol. 1 (1939) upto and including vol. 68 (2006). There doesn’t appear to be any option to subscribe to current or post-2006 content electronically. Details of the printed post-2006 issues can be found in SOLO.

Mediaeval Studies is published annually and covers research in the Middle Ages very widely, largely published in English and French. > Read more about this journal.

Indexes

Some useful searchable indexes in PDF are available from the Mediaeval Studies website at http://www.pims.ca/publications/journal-mediaeval-studies. They are:

Volumes 1–76 (1939–2014)

Volumes 51–69 (1989–2007)

Related links

> More news on resources for medievalists

Aschkenas: Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur der Juden – now available online from v.5, 1995

We start the new month with the news that AschkenasZeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur der Juden [ISSN 1016-4987], an important German journal on Jewish history and culture, is now available electronically from vol. 5 (1995) via SOLO and OU eJournals.

Aschkenas - cover“Aschkenas concentrates on the history and culture of the Ashkenazic Jews (those living in Central and Western Europe as well as North Italy), from the time when Ashkenazic Jewish culture was gradually forming in late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages up to the emancipation of the Jews in the 19th century. It also includes articles dealing with issues outside this period of time and geographical area. Aschkenas publishes essays, source editions, literature and research reports as well as reviews of current new publications.” De Gruyter website, http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/asch, accessed 3 May 2016.

You can set up electronic Table of Content (eToC) and New Article alerts. The articles are indexed in a number of online subscription databases, including Historical Abstracts and the MLA Bibliography.

You might also be interested in…

… more news on history ejournals.

ejournal updates: Journal of Transcultural Medieval Studies, London Journal, Mediaevalia, Midland History, Peritia, Viator

Oxford historians now have access to a new journal and to the backfiles of a number of other important academic journals. Medievalists and English local historians are benefitting most this time. Enjoy!

New ejournal: Journal of Transcultural Medieval Studies

de Gruyter
ISSN 2198-0357
v. 1, 2014 – current

Journal of transcultural medieval studies - cover“The new Journal of Transcultural Medieval Studies will provide a forum for scholarship of pre-modern times. It publishes comparative studies, which systematically reflect the entanglement and the interconnection of European, African, Asian and American cultures. The Journal will pursue an interdisciplinary approach. It also intends to foster methodological reflections on transculturality in the broad sense.

Each issue of the Journal of Transcultural Medieval Studies will comprise three sections: 1) Articles, either miscellaneous or in thematic panels, 2) Reviews of recent publications in the field, committed to detailed and constructive criticism, 3) News, offering an up-to-date forum for the most recent activities in transcultural research (institutions, projects, networks, conferences, workshops).

Papers are selected in a double-blind peer review process and accepted for publication by an international Advisory Board.” from http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jtms (accessed 18 April 2016)

Complete e-access:

The London Journal: A Review of Metropolitan Society Past and Present (Routledge, ISSN 0305-8034): v. 1 (1), 1975 – current

Midland History (Routledge, ISSN 0047-729X). v. 1 (1), 1971 – current

Peritia (Brepols, ISSN 0332-1592). v. 1, 1982 – current

Viator: Medieval and Renaissance Studies (Brepols, ISSN  0083-5897). v. 1, 1971- current

Now partially available online:

Mediaevalia (State University of New York Press, ISSN 0361-946X): v. 32, 2011 – current

 

You might also be interested in…

… more news on history ejournals.

New ejournal: Erudition and the Republic of Letters, 1, 2016-

Just before breaking up for term, here are details of a brand new journal:

Erudition and Republic of Letters - coverErudition and the Republic of Letters is a peer-reviewed journal devoted primarily to the history of scholarship, intellectual history, and to the respublica literaria broadly conceived.

It encapsulates multifarious aspects of higher learning as well as the manner in which such knowledge transcends confessional and geopolitical boundaries.

Brill 1, 2016-
ISSN: 2405-5050
E-ISSN: 2405-5069

Access is via SOLO and OU eJournals.

Table of content for volume 1, issue 1 (2016)

Iamblichus, Ficino and Schleiermacher on the Sources of Religious Knowledge
Author: James Hankins
pp.: 1–12 (12)

Christianity’s Jewish Origins Rediscovered: The Roles of Comparison in Early Modern Ecclesiastical Scholarship
Author: Anthony Grafton
pp.: 13–42 (30)

Erudition and Orthodoxy: John Fell and Patristic Scholarship in Restoration Oxford
Author: Jean-Louis Quantin
pp.: 43–78 (36)

Bernhard Pez: An Austrian Benedictine Scholar between Sacred Antiquarianism and New Practices of Scholarship
Authors: Thomas Stockinger and Thomas Wallnig
pp.: 79–105 (27)

Book Reviews
World Antiquarianism: Comparative Perspectives. Edited by Alain Schnapp with Lothar von Falkenhausen, Peter N. Miller, and Tim Murray. Los Angeles, LA: Getty Research Institute, 2013. ISBN 978-1-60606-148-0
Author: Kelsey Jackson Williams
pp.: 107–111 (5)

World Philology, ed. Sheldon Pollock, Benjamin A. Elman, and Ku-ming Kevin Chang. xii + 452 pp. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015). ISBN: 9780674052864.
Author: James Turner
pp.: 112–116 (5)

Katherine Harloe, Winckelmann and the Invention of Antiquity. History and Aesthetics in the Age of Altertumswissenschaft (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), 304 pp. ISBN: 978-0-19-969584-3.
Author: Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann
pp.: 117–120 (4)

New ejournal: The Medieval Low Countries, 1, 2014-

I’m pleased to announce that Oxford users now have access to the ejournal The Medieval Low Countries: An Annual Review [ISSN: 2295-3493], issue 1, 2014 onwards.
Medieval Low Countries cover
Published by Brepols Publishers, The Medieval Low Countries is a peer-reviewed journal featuring scholarly articles on the Low Countries (les Pays-Bas) from c 400 AD to c 1500. During this time, the area of roughly modern-day Belgium and The Netherlands was an important political, economic, cultural and religious hub in medieval Europe.

The journal is published annually and its scholarly articles cover a wide range of disciplines (history, law, religion, art, architecture, literature, etc.). The topics are often interdisciplinary and usually in either French or English. Book reviews are also published.

If you want to keep up-to-date with this journal, just sign up to a New Issue Alerting.

Table of contents for issue 1 (2014):

  • Jean-Francois Nieus et Steven Vanderputten, ‘Diplôme princier, matrice de faux, acte modèle. Le règlement d’avouerie du comte Baudoin V pour Saint-Bertin (1042) et ses réappropriations sous l’abbatiat réformateur de Lambert (1095-1123)’.
  • Aart Noordzij, ‘The wars of the lord of Bronkhorst: Territory, lordship and the proliferation of violence in fourteenth-century Guelders’.
  • Rombert Stapel and Jenine de Vries, ‘Leydis, Pauli, and Berchen revisited. Collective history writing in the Low Countries in the late fifteenth century’.
  • Tom Gaens, ‘Acquiring religious perfection outside a vow. The Carthusian institution of the donati in late-medieval reformist communities and the Modern Devotion’.
  • Mario Damen, ‘Patricians, knights, or nobles? Historiography and social status in late-medieval Antwerp’.
  • Hans Mol, ‘The Cistercian model? The application of the grange system by the various religious orders in the Frisian coastal area, 1150-1400’.
  • Book reviews

Other recently subscribed to ejournals for medievalists: