New: The Grand Tour

I am pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have access to The Grand Tour (Adam Matthew Digital). Use your SSO for remote access.

As thousands of British tourists are currently enjoying their holidays in Europe, no doubt Facebooking and Instagramming their experiences and sights, it is worth reflecting back how travel accounts used to be written and at a time when European travel was reserved to the aristocratic and wealthy young men of the eighteenth century and seen as part of their education.

The Grand Tour, a term first used by J. Gailhard, The compleat gentleman, or, Directions for the education of youth as to their breeding at home and travelling abroad (1678)*, was a phenomenon which shaped the creative and intellectual sensibilities of some of the eighteenth century’s greatest artists, writers and thinkers. Now researchers have access to digitised accounts of the English abroad in Europe c1550-1850.

The source materials in The Grand Tour highlight the influence of continental travel on British art, architecture, urban planning, literature and philosophy. They are also useful for the study of daily life in the eighteenth century, whether it be on transportation, communications, money, social norms, health, sex or food and drink. Furthermore, the material covers European political and religious life, British diplomacy; life at court, and social customs on the Continent, and is an excellent resource for the study of Europe’s urban spaces. This resource will be useful for those studying history, history of art and architecture, British and European literature.

There is a wealth of detail about cities such as Paris, Rome, Florence and Geneva, including written accounts and visual representations of street life, architecture and urban planning.

What is included?

The Grand Tour provides full-text access to a curated collection of manuscripts, printed works and visual resources. The materials draw on collections held in a number of libraries and archives, including many in private or neglected collections. Assembling these in a single resource will allow researchers for the first time to better compare the sources.

In particular the scanned and indexed materials include letters; diaries and journals; account books; printed guidebooks; published travel writing; but also visual resources such as paintings and sketches; architectural drawings and maps. Palaeographical skills are needed to decipher manuscript letters. Some images of scanned manuscripts are challenging to read.

Using an interactive map, researchers can also locate any sources related to a town or city:

Also included is an online version of John Ingamells (comp.), Dictionary and Archive of Travellers in Italy 1701-1800 (New Haven, 1997). This well-known publication lists over 6,000 individual Grand Tourists, provides biographical details and details of their tours.

For those needing an introductory and historiographical account of Grand Tour research, there are essays by Professors Jeremy Black, Edward Chaney and Rosemary Sweet.

Other supplementary aids include a chronology of 18th century European events, a political chronology of Italy, and a list of Italian rulers, as well as a selected bibliography for further reading.

The Grand Tour is accessible to Oxford researchers and Bodleian-registered readers via SOLO or OxLIP+.

Also useful

ANSELL, Richard, Foubert’s academy : British and Irish elite formation in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Paris and London, in Beyond the Grand Tour : Northern metropolises and early modern travel behaviour; edited by Rosemary Sweet, Gerrit Verhoeven and Sarah Goldsmith. (London: Routledge, 2017)

GOLDSMITH, Sarah, Dogs, Servants and Masculinities : Writing about Danger on the Grand Tour, in Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 40:1 (2017) 3-21, DOI: 10.1111/1754-0208.12342.

*Oxford English Dictionary, http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/80717, accessed 17 August 2017

New: Gallup Analytics – US public opinion data since 1935 & world polls since 2005

Gallup Analytics - landing pageI am delighted to announce that Social Science Library colleagues have subscribed to  Gallup Analytics. It is now accessible via SOLO or OxLIP+.

Note that the subscription is limited to only one user at a time so here’s a plea to close your browser when you are finished or are going for a cup of tea so that others can access it.

Gallup Analytics is a searchable resource of unique public opinion data and analysis compiled by Gallup, Inc. It includes answers to more than 125,000 questions, and responses from more than 3.5 million people interviewed in the Unites States since 1935.

With this data resource you can:

  • perform detailed searches on hundreds of U.S. and global metrics
  • examine data by demographic and socio-economic groups, including income, education, age and gender
  • export data to create custom data tables, trends, charts and scatter plots

Gallup Analytics comes in three parts:

  1. Gallup Brain (historic surveys going back to 1935)
  2. Gallup World Poll (surveys from 160+ countries since 2005)
  3. Gallup Daily Tracking (daily surveys across the US since 2008).

Gallup Brain (historic content 1935-2000s)

Historians are most likely going to be interested in Gallup Brain. As it’s not very obvious how to find it, here are some tips:
To access the historic content, click on Gallup Brain (bottom of the homepage)

Gallup Analytics - GallupBrain for historic data

You can browse surveys by decade or search by keyword:

GallupBrain - 1940s

Gallup World Poll (post-2005 surveys)

Here is an example where I’ve asked for mapped EU responses in which EU country immigrants would find a “good place”. Comparing it to 2016 makes a very interesting comparison!

Immigrants – European Union: 55% (2006) Good place – Aggregate

Immigrants – European Union: 55% (2006) Good place – Aggregate

Modernists can find surveys which cover many other topics, amongst others:
  • economic confidence
  • employment
  • entrepreneurial energy
  • confidence in leadership
  • confidence in military and police
  • religion
  • food access
  • corruption
  • freedom of media
  • life evaluations

 

Trial until 24 Oct: Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War

Oxford users are now invited to trial Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War which is now available via OxLIP+ and SOLO.

This resouTrench journal trial - logorce provides online access to digitised rare magazines published by service personnel of the First World War. Published by every type of military and support service unit, from every involved nation, trench journals were a means of expression through which men and women engaged in all aspects of World War I could share their thoughts and experiences.

It will be useful to those researching literature, history, war studies, cultural studies, and gender studies of the First World War period. The sources include over 1,500 periodicals, drawn from the holdings of major libraries and research collections, including the Imperial War Museums and the British Library.

While the majority of the magazines are English, the collection includes 188 French magazines, 182 German magazines, 10 Italian magazines, etc. In term of geographical spread, most Unit magazines comes from the Western Front and Great Britain, but there are some from Egypt, India, the Eastern Front, Gallipoli‎, etc.

The Illustrated War News 93 p7 May 1918 - Army Music at Kneller Hall School (Proquest: Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War)

The Illustrated War News 93 p7 May 1918 – Army Music at Kneller Hall School (Proquest: Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War)

You can search for publications by Unit names, Unit types or Unit locations. In Advanced Search you can also limit your search to types of content, such as cartoons, editorials, poem and drama, but also statistics, photographs, musical scores, etc.

Please leave feedback at History databases desiderata & trials or email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

New: European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century (Archives Unbound)

European Colonialism in the early 20th century - excerptOxford historians will be pleased to know that you now have access to a digital collection of English-language sources relating to early 20th century European colonialism and US foreign relations.

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century (Archives Unbound) is now on OxLIP+ and SOLO.

The individual collections of U.S. State Department documents are also cross-searchable:

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century: Colonialism and Nationalism in the Dutch East Indies, 1910-1930European Colonialism in the early 20th century - Dutch East IndiesThe Dutch East Indies experienced the replacement of company rule by Dutch government rule and the complete transformation of Java into a colonial society and the successful extension of colonial rule to Sumatra and the eastern archipelago during the early 20th century. The boundaries of the modern state of Indonesia were defined during this time and the process of generally exploitative political, military, and economic integration began. This collection of over 15,000 images from the National Archives (US) provides access to correspondence, studies and reports, cables, maps, and other kinds of documents related to U.S. consular activities. U.S. Consulates were listening posts reporting on the activities of the Dutch colonial government and the activities of the native peoples.

Source Note: Record Group 59, Records of the U.S. State Department, Central Classified Files, Class 800, Netherlands, 1910-1929. Includes content only for country codes for Netherlands East Indies and associated islands: 856d, 856e, 856f, 856g, 856h, and 856i. Formerly part of National Archives microfilm publication M68, reels 28-54.

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century: Italian Colonies in North Africa and Aggression in East Africa, 1930-1939

European Colonialism in the early 20th century - ItalyItalian colonial aspirations and policies mimicked those of other European countries during the modern period. Italian colonial policy during the period 1930-1939 was shaped more by Fascism. Fascist tenets related to governance and social policy was used in the administration and treatment of the African population in Libya, Eritrea, Somalia, and Italian East Africa. This collection of over 6,000 images from the National Archives (US) comprises correspondence, studies and reports, cables, maps, and other kinds of documents related to U.S. consular activities. U.S. Consulates were listening posts reporting on the activities of the Italian colonial governments and later the mandate authorities, and the activities of the native peoples.

Source Note: Record Group 59, Records of the U.S. State Department, Central Classified Files, Class 800, Italy, 1930-1939. Includes content only for Italian colonial possessions in Africa, including country codes: 65a, 65b, 65c, 65d. Formerly part of National Archives microfilm publication M1423, reels 29-33

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century: Political and Economic Consolidation of Portuguese Colonies in Africa, 1910-1929

European Colonialism in the early 20th century - PortugalThis collection of over 8,000 images from the National Archives (US) comprises correspondence, studies and reports, cables, maps, and other kinds of documents related to U.S. consular activities. U.S. Consulates were listening posts reporting on the activities of the Portuguese colonial government and the activities of the native peoples. Highlights include the beginning of an anti-colonial movement and the industrialization and economic exploitation of Portugal’s African colonies.

Source Note: Record Group 59, Records of the U.S. State Department, Central Classified Files, Class 800, Portugal, 1910-1929. Includes content only for Portuguese colonial possessions in Africa, including country codes: 53h, 53i, 53k, 53m, 53n, 53p, 53q. Formerly part of National Archives microfilm publication M705, reels 25-34.

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century: French Colonialism in Africa: From Algeria to Madagascar, 1910-1930

European Colonialism in the early 20th century - FranceThis collection of over 17,000 images from the National Archives (US) comprises correspondence, studies and reports, cables, maps, and other kinds of documents related to U.S. consular activities. U.S. Consulates were listening posts reporting on the activities of the French colonial government and the activities of the native peoples. Highlights include the beginning of an anti-colonial movement and problems along the Moroccan-Algerian border.

Source Note: Record Group 59, Records of the U.S. State Department, Central Classified Files, Class 800, France, 1910-1929. Includes content only for French colonial possessions in Africa, including country codes: 51r, 51s, 51t, 51u, 51v, 51w, 51x. Formerly part of National Archives microfilm publication M560, reels 154-162.

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century: German Colonies in Asia and the Pacific: From Colonialism to Japanese Mandates, 1910-1929

European Colonialism in the early 20th century - GermanyGerman Colonial aspirations in Asia and the Pacific ended with the start of the First World War. Japanese Army forces seized German leased territories in China and the Japanese naval forces occupied the German Pacific colonies. The Treaty of Versailles legitimized Japan’s aggression and the territories were officially mandated to the Japanese government. This collection of over 10,000 images from the National Archives (US) comprises correspondence, studies and reports, cables, maps, and other kinds of documents related to U.S. consular activities. U.S. Consulates were listening posts reporting on the activities of the German colonial governments and later the Japanese mandate authorities, and the activities of the native peoples. Source Note: Record Group 59, Records of the U.S. State Department, Central Classified Files, Class 800, Germany, 1910-1929. Includes content only for German colonial possessions in Asia and the Pacific, including country codes: 62a, 62c, 62d, 62e, 62f, 62g, 62h, 621, 62k, 62L, 62m. Formerly part of National Archives microfilm publication M336, reels 156-165.

Related resources:

  • Germany. Auswärtiges Amt. Akten zur deutschen auswärtigen Politik, 1918-1945. Var. series (Göttingen: Vandenhoek & Ruprecht, 1982-) [Bodleian Upper Reading Room K.9.8 selections] Also: Documents on German Foreign Policy 1918-1945 (transl.) [Bodleian Upper Reading Room K.9.8]
  • France. Ministère des affaires étrangères. Documents diplomatiques français (1871-) [Bodleian Upper Reading Room K.8.80, selections]
  • Italy. Commissione per la pubblicazione dei documenti diplomatici. Documenti diplomatici italiani. (1861-)

New ejournal: Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft, 2006-

Magic ritual and witchcraft coverOxford users now have access to the electronic Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft, v 1(1) 2006- (ISSN: 1556-8547).

Published by University of Pennsylvania Press, this scholarly journal “draws from a broad spectrum of perspectives, methods, and disciplines, offering the widest possible geographical scope and chronological range, from prehistory to the modern era and from the Old World to the New. In addition to original research, the journal features book reviews, editorials, and lists of newly published work.”

A great journal for those researching witchcraft or first-year historians who have signed up for next term’s Optional Subject Witch-craft and witch-hunting in early modern Europe.

Here is a sample table of Contents for vol. 8 (1), summer 2013:

Foreword: On Shamans, Witches, and Stories
Claire Fanger

Nocturnal Journeys and Ritual Dances in Bernardino of Siena 4
Michael D Bailey

Burchard’s strigae, the Witches’ Sabbath, and Shamanistic Cannibalism in Early Modern Europe 18
Emma Wilby

Ritualized Violence against Sorcerers in Fifteenth-Century France
Aleksandra Pfau

Stephen Mitchell’s Witchcraft and Magic in the Nordic Middle Ages An Assessment and Appreciation
Ronald Hutton

Magic and Witchcraft Historicized, Localized, and Ethnicized: A Response to Stephen Mitchell’s Witchcraft and Magic in the Nordic Middle Ages
Thomas A. Dubois

New: The Mediaeval Journal, 1 (2011-) now online

I am pleased to announce that Oxford medievalists now have online access to The Mediaeval Journal (ISSN p: 2033-5385; e: 2033-5393), 1, 2011- to current. Access is via SOLO or OU eJournals.

Mediaeval journal coverThe Mediaeval Journal is the first European-based cross-disciplinary and multinational journal of Medieval Studies to be published in the lingua franca of English. It is also the first journal to address the two most exciting and productive trends in current Mediaeval Studies: the turn towards multinational work and towards cross-disciplinarity.

In an increasingly multinational academic world of collaboration and intellectual exchange, scholars all over Europe and beyond are ever more frequently realizing that important research is emerging from outside their national academies. The Mediaeval Journal recognizes the rich opportunities that this movement represents.  Moreover, in fulfilling its cross-disciplinary remit, The Mediaeval Journal publishes articles mixing approaches from traditional subjects with areas and perspectives which are currently under-explored.

Aiming to offer wide disciplinary coverage in each issue, it welcomes submissions from specialists in all areas of Mediaeval Studies, whether they come from traditional disciplines like Art History, History, Archaeology, Theology, Languages/Literatures, and English, or from less-exposed fields such as Islamic Studies, Jewish Studies, Manuscript Studies, Mediaevalism, Material Culture, History of Medicine and Science, History of Ideas, Queer Studies, Postcolonial Studies, and Musicology, and others.” Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews.

The General Editors are Margaret Connolly, Ian Johnson and James Palmer. Oxford’s own Prof. Vincent Gillespie is also on the editorial board (pdf) together with many eminent medievalists.

Table of content of the most recent issue:

Volume 3, Number 2 / 2013

  • A Living Language of the Dead? French Commemorative Inscriptions from Late Medieval England / Author: David Griffith
  • Jerusalem behind Walls: Enclosure, Substitute Pilgrimage, and Imagined Space in the Poor Clares’ Convent at Villingen / Author: Marie-Luise Ehrenschwendtner
  • The Iconography of ‘Husband-Beating’ on Late Medieval English Misericords / Author: Betsy L. Chunko
  • ‘I am here’: Reading Julian of Norwich in Nineteenth-Century New England / Author: Allan F. Westphall
  • Reviews

Europeana app for iPad: digital resources on European culture at your fingertips

Europeana app cover

Europeana app. Click to download from iTunes

Europeana fans and those who looking for digital resources relating to European culture will be delighted to know that there is a free app “Europeana Open Culture” for the iPad.

What is Europeana?

Europeana is a vast and growing digital library capturing digital cultual resources of Europe’s galleries, museums, libraries, archives and audiovisual collections.

It Includes many different types of materials:

  • images of paintings,
  • drawings,
  • maps,
  • photos and pictures of museum objects;
  • texts of books,
  • newspapers,
  • letters, diaries and archival papers;
  • sounds of music and spoken word from cylinders, tapes, discs and radio broadcasts;
  • videos, films, newsreels and TV broadcasts.

There are also themed collections, e.g. Europeana 1914-19.

Which countries are covered?

The list of contributing libraries, museums, etc. is long but very interesting. It gives you an idea of the countries involved and scale of the operation.

Looking to use some images? Some resources are free for re-use but please check on terms & conditions first.

If you are reading this from an ipad, then you can download the app from iTunes.

Related Links:

Check out our Pinterest board Apps for Historians for more useful apps.pinterest

 

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)

The United States’ answer to Europeana for Europe, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. “The DPLA offers a single point of access to millions of items—photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more—from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States. Users can browse and search the DPLA’s collections by timeline, map, format, and topic; save items to customized lists; and share their lists with others. Users can also explore digital exhibitions curated by the DPLA’s content partners and staff.

Trial until 16 May: Early European Books

Oxford readers are now invited to trial the complete Early European Books. Note that Early European Books 2 (Italian collection) is already held in Oxford.

EEBEarly European Books provides scholars with new ways of accessing and exploring the printed record of early modern Europe, drawing together a diverse array of printed sources from the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries. All works printed in Europe before 1701, regardless of language, fall within the scope of the project, together with all pre-1701 works in European languages printed further afield.

Early European Books builds upon and complements Early English Books Online (EEBO) and is largely concerned with non-Anglophone materials.

Let us know what you think!

Trial ends 16 May 2013. You can leave feedback on the History databases desiderata or email Isabel Holowaty.

Easier access to CD-Roms in Upper Radcliffe Camera

Our consultation space

Access to some key history CD-Roms has been added to the library PC in the consultation space in the Upper Radcliffe Camera, next to the Bodleian History Faculty Library Staff Office. Please contact us if you would like more information.

Luther’s Works
The Luther’s Works CD ROM (the 55 volume American edition of Luther’s Works, ed. by Jaroslav Pelikan and Helmut Lehmann)  for SS Luther and the German Reformation has been loaded on to the PC in the consultation space, and by clicking on the icon “Libronix Digital Library System” readers can access it with no need to request the CD from the office or spending time installing it.

This CD-Rom makes available the entire 55-volume set of Luther’s Works, a magisterial translation project published jointly by Fortress Press and Concordia Publishing House in 1957.  It includes the entire Luther corpus, the KJV Bible, and the Book of Concord (Tappert edition).

Enduring Vision
The Enduring Vision CD has  been installed but readers  still need to request the CD from the office before the programs can be used.

The CD is an electronic version of The Enduring Vision by Paul Boyer, et al., a history textbook of the American people. In addition to the text and appendixes in the printed textbook, this interactive edition also contains audio, video, maps, charts, and software tools to explore the text and data.

Gandhi
The Gandhi CD  CD has also been installed but readers  still need to request the CD from the office before the programs can be used.

The CD offers four multimedia presentations: Introducing Gandhiji, Landmark events, Gandhian concepts, and the electronic book, containing the Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi in chronological order.

Related Links
SOLO | Undergraduate collections

New to Oxford users: Anti-Calvin / The Huguenots

Oxford users now have access to two new resources from the Brill Primary Sources Online series. They are particularly relevant to early modern historians, theologians and historians of the Reformation. There is very good presence of digitised French texts. The images of the scans can be viewed as pdfs and printed or downloaded. Texts can also be exported as zip files.

Anti-Calvin

John Calvin

This database comprises the writings of French Catholics against the doctrines of John Calvin (1509-1564) and other protestant leaders. France was a major centre in the clash between Catholics and Protestants during the sixteenth century. Much of the Protestant literature was in French in the hopes of converting the French people. In response, the Catholic Church preserved its position in France with these documents. This archive includes both sixteenth-century attacks on Calvinism and Protestantism as well as defences of the Catholic doctrine.

Anti-Calvin is now available to Oxford users.

The Huguenots

This collection offers a comprehensive survey of the original writings of the French Huguenot authors, from the first stirrings of radical dissent in the 1530s through to the end of the century. The selection privileges first and foremost original writings of authors writing within France and for an exclusively French audience. Thus whereas Calvin’s Genevan writings are not included, the tracts penned by Theodore de Bèze as part of the polemic exchange during the Colloquy of Poissy (1561) do appear here.

All told the writings collected here reveal an intellectually vibrant movement, meeting unprecedented challenges and later hardship with that mixture of confidence, aggression, and resolution in the face of adversity that characterises Calvinist churches of this era throughout Europe.

The Huguenots is now available to Oxford users.

Other related resources: