Paas’ German Political Broadsheet 1600-1700 now in Upper Reading Room

Those researching seventeenth century German history, especially the Thirty Years’ War, will be pleased to learn that I have added the entire set of Paas’ German Political Broadsheet to the Upper Reading Room, Old Bodleian Library, so that it is more easily accessible and browsable.

german-political-broadsheets-1600-1700-set-of-vols

Paas, John Roger, The German Political Broadsheet, 1600-1700. 12 vols. (Wiesbaden, 1985). Shelfmark: URR K.9.1.

 

Paas’ meticulous research in finding, describing and publishing all known extant 17th century broadsheets is wonderful and sometimes underrated source material covering a tumultuous period in German and Central European history. In particular the first half of the century saw the Thirty Years’ War 1618-1648, one of Europe’s most violent religious war.

While the majority of the broadsheets are located in German libraries, museums and archives, the ambition to publish as complete a record of German broadsheets as possible has sent Paas on research trips to over 180 libraries, archives and private collections across Europe and the US. Over 3,000 broadsheets are reproduced in full-page size and all known copies are cited.

german-political-broadsheets-1600-1700-image

Paas, John Roger, The German Political Broadsheet, 1600-1700. (Wiesbaden, 1985) vol. 1, p. 232.

The entire set publishes the broadsheets chronologically. Each volume introduces the period with a helpful scholarly overview of the years and period in question. The repositories are carefully listed and each plate has a brief description and shelfmarks.

Suggested reading

Recommended web resources

Newly received History books: Holy Roman Empire, Luther, German pensions, Turkey & Soviet Union

In this batch of newly received History books, there is an unmistakably German theme, spanning all periods from medieval to post-1945 history. In a week where Germany is reviewing the pensionable age and relations with Turkey are strained, the following selection might be of interest:

Bleuler, Anna Kathrin ; Klingbeil, Anja-Marieke, Welterfahrung und Welterschliessung in Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit. (Heidelberg : Universitätsverlag Winter, 2016)

Wilson, Peter H., The Holy Roman Empire : a thousand years of Europe’s history (London: Allan Lane, 2016)

Roper, Lyndal, Martin Luther : renegade and prophet (London, Bodley Head, 2016)

Mierzejewski, Alfred C., A history of the German public pension system : continuity amid change (Lanham : Lexington Books, 2016)

Pekesen, Berna, Zwischen Sympathie und Eigennutz : NS-Propaganda und die türkische Presse im Zweiten Weltkrieg (Berlin : Lit, 2014)

Brunner, Detlev ; Scherstjanoi, Elke, Moskaus Spuren in Ostdeutschland 1945 bis 1949 : Aktenerschliessung und Forschungspläne (Berlin : De Gruyter, 2015)

New History books 24 August 2016There is more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Remembering V.E. Day – Reginald McCarthy’s donation of Nazi books to the Bodleian Library

Today, on 8 May, seems an appropriate moment to mark the 71st Victory in Europe Day, or V.E. Day, by publicly acknowledging, thanking and remembering a kind bibliophile for donating some Nazi publications to the Bodleian Library. Such material should continue to be made accessible and preserved, ideally in a library, as a reminder to subsequent generations of the horrors of the Third Reich and the Second World War. Photos of Hitler posing with children make for very uncomfortable and unnerving viewing as do shots of the German navy, however excellent the German photographic skills and equipment are.

As so often, libraries are the vehicles through which members of the public, scholars and students can benefit from the generosity of other members of the public. My warmest thanks must therefore go to Mr Andrew McCarthy for his kindness in donating the following books, which once belonged to his father Mr Reginald McCarthy, to the Bodleian Library:Deutscher Fuhrer Deutsches Schicksal - cover

Hans Heinz Mantau-Sadila (Hrsg.), Deutsche Führer, Deutsches Schicksal : das Buch der Künder und Führer des Dritten Reiches. (München : Steinebach, 1934)

Hans Weberstedt, Kurt Langner, Adolf Hitler & Kurt Langner, Gedenkhalle für die Gefallenen des Dritten Reiches. (München : Zentralverlag der NSDAP, Franz Eher Nachf., 1935)Hitler with boy

Heinrich Hoffmann (Hrsg.), Jugend um Hitler : 120 Bilddokumente aus der Umgebung des Führers. 1.-30 Tsd. (Berlin : Zeitgeschichte-Verl., Nationalsozialismus, 1935)

Fritz-Otto Busch, Die deutsche Kriegsmarine im Kampf: Schiffe und Taten. 1. – 20 Tsd.(Berlin : Vier Tannen Verlag, 1943)Feind Im Fadenkreuz 8

Norbert von Baumbach, Ruhmestage der Deutschen Marine: Bilddokumente des Seekrieges.  (Hamburg : Broschek, 1933)

Werner Hartmann, Feind in Fadenkreuz: U-Boot auf Jagd im Atlantik. Mit einem Vorwort vom Befehlshaber der U-Boote, Vizeadmiral Karl Dönitz. (Berlin : Verlag Die Heimbücherei,  1942)

Josef Pöchlinger, Das Buch vom Westwall. 2. Aufl. (Berlin : O. Elsner, 1940)Deutscher Jugendklang 3

Heinrich Pfannschmidt, Arthur Schmidt & Otto Roy, Deutscher Jugendklang. T. 1. Liederbuch f. VI-OI. Mit e. kurzen Elementarlehre d. Musik. 3. durchges. Aufl. (Berlin Trowitzsch, 1938)

Edwin Erich Dwinger, Zwischen Weiss und Rot : die russische Tragödie 1919-1920  (Jena : Diederichs, 1930)

Apart from the historiographical interest, those interested in the history of photography will likewise find some of the visual content noteworthy.

Below, Mr Andrew McCarthy reflects on his father’s life, his interest in German culture, his loathing of Hitler and keen book-collecting but also book-donating habits to school libraries and German prisoners of war. He sounds a fascinating and multi-faceted man.

Isabel Holowaty, History Librarian

REFLECTIONS ON MY FATHER

by Andrew McCarthy

Reginald McCarthy. © Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

Reginald McCarthy. © Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

I cannot remember a time when I was not surrounded by books.  My father, Reginald McCarthy, bought and read books all his life.  He taught me to read when I was four, and as soon as I could read, he bought books for me.  He was born in 1896 and died in 1982.  He served in the East Yorkshire Regiment during the Great War, and was wounded at Passchendaele.  He spent most of his working life as an architect, surveyor, and estate agent. In the 1930s he owned and edited a local weekly newspaper, the “Hornsea and District Bulletin”, in the East Riding of Yorkshire.  No copies are known to survive.

My father spoke fluent German, which he had taught himself in an era when German books were printed in Gothic type.  He would walk around the house declaiming Heine’s “Die Lorelei”, which he knew by heart.

He loathed the Nazis, Hitler, and all that he stood for, but he would buy almost anything in German if it looked interesting. I grew up seeing the books which I have given to the Bodleian Library sitting next to “Andersen’s Märchen und Geschichten”, German editions of Shakespeare,  “Im Westen Nichts Neues”, “Die Kreuzerfahrten der Goeben und Breslau”, and my boyhood favourite, “Auto, Schiff und Flugzeug.”

He was an obsessive collector, who believed that money spent on bookshelves could be better spent on books.  There were piles of books all over our house.  If my father needed a book which was at the bottom of a pile, he would pull it out carefully.  The pile would wobble, but stay upright, only to fall over days later, often in the middle of dinner.  In 1977, there were over 3,500 books in our house.

My father loved collecting, but he also enjoyed giving books away to school libraries, or anyone else who might appreciate them.  I don’t think he ever imagined that some of his books would end up in the Bodleian.  He gave books to the libraries of the schools I attended.  I have 28 letters (I’ve just counted them!) from Sister Augustine, the Headmistress of St. Joseph’s Preparatory School in Nottingham, thanking him for books.  She said:

“I think soon the Library will have to be known as the McCarthy library…  Mr Crawley has already absorbed the books into the library, and, as I have said before, thanks to you it is building up into something truly worthwhile.” 

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

I also have some letters which were sent to him in 1946 and 1947 from the Commandant of the Prisoner of War Camp in Wollaton Park, in Nottingham, thanking him for several donations of books.

The Second World War had only just ended, but my father felt sorry for the German prisoners, so he gave them books in German.  He loathed the Nazis, but he’d fought against German soldiers on the Somme in 1916 and at Passchendaele in 1917, and was able to see “Jerry”, as he always called the German soldier, as a human being.

It’s interesting to learn how the system at the Prisoner of War Camp worked.  My father was asked if he would send the Commandant the full details of any books he wanted to give to the camp library, so that they could be approved (or not) by “the appropriate department in London”.  “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” was welcomed with enthusiasm, but “ANILIN” was on the banned list.

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

My father’s record-keeping was chaotic – just like his shelving of books – but I am fairly sure that he bought the Nazi books from Foyle’s on the Charing Cross Road in the 1930s.  He told me that the staff kept them on one side for him.  When a young British Nazi, or Fascist, had repeatedly asked if they had any books about Hitler and the Nazis.  Foyles’ staff pretended that they didn’t.  They were keeping the books for my father, because they knew he hated Hitler.  My father was a loyal reader of the “Daily Telegraph”, which, along with the “Manchester Guardian”, reported the activities of the Nazis in the 1930s fairly accurately.  The editor of the “Times”, Geoffrey Dawson, was an appeaser, and would suppress or modify news stories which might anger Hitler.

From 1922 until 1932 my father lived in Hornsea, in the East Riding of Yorkshire.  He was an architect, surveyor, and estate agent.  He owned and edited the local weekly newspaper, the “Hornsea and District Bulletin.”  As if he didn’t have enough to do, he also ran a private library.  This was in his office in Newbegin, Hornsea.  Books could be borrowed for a small annual subscription.  This was the heyday of the private library, when Boots and and W.H. Smith’s branches would lend books for a small fee.

From "Beverley Guardian", 8 February 1930

From “Beverley Guardian”,
8 February 1930

 

From 1927 until 1931-1932, my father was a member of the Hornsea Urban District Council.  He said that there were: “Three Colonels, a major, a plumber, a cobbler and a postman M.P.  Politics were banned, they sat round the table classless, for the good of their town.”

In 1930, the council proposed establishing a public lending library.  At first, my father objected, because Hornsea ratepayers would have to bear some of the cost, as this cutting from the “Beverley Guardian”, of February 8th 1930, explains.  When the East Riding County Council offered a library of one thousand books, paid for by the County, my father withdrew his objection.  The library, in the Town Hall, opened on March 14th, 1930.  It opened 101 times in its first year, and 29,542 books were issued.  Some residents were not as conscientious as they should have been.  In June, 1931, the Waterworks, Fire Brigade, Museum and Library Committee decided to write “strong letters to persons who had failed to return books within the allotted time”.

My father’s obsession with books lasted all his life.  He would have been astonished and delighted to learn that some of his books have ended up in the Bodleian.

 

Andrew McCarthy is the author of “The Huns Have Got My Gramophone: Advertisements from the Great War”, Bodleian Library Publishing, 2014. http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/bodley/news/2014/jun-24

New LibGuide: German archives: a guide to discovering and using them

Students and researchers intending to use archives in Germany might find the new German archives: a guide to discovering and using them useful.

LibGuide - German archivesCreated by Ms Ulrike Kändler as part of her internship at the Bodleian Library, August 2014, the guide is designed to help you finding your way through German archives and to enable you identifying exactly what you need for your research – quick and easy! There are more than 3.600 archives offering their holdings and services in Germany so it can be daunting to know where to start.

The guide comes in three main sections:

  • Get Ready
    You are planning a research trip to Germany? Or you are for the first time ever on your way into an archive? Here you will find everything you need to know to make the most of your trip
  • Discover German Archives
    Which archives should you visit? Here you will find a short introduction on the various types of German archives as well as links to a number of the more important ones.
  • Find it
    Here you are introduced to some different search tools: Regional gateways to search by region and identify smaller archives or meta/search engines such as Kalliope.

The many archives are usefully indexed by broad subject areas as follows:LibGuide - German Archives - Bundesarchiv

  • State Archives
  • Municipal and local archives
  • Church archives
  • Literary archives
  • Economic archives
  • Political Archives
  • Media archives
  • University archives
  • Movement archives

Do you know your Ablieferungsliste from your Zugang?

A glossary will help you understand specialists terms you are likely to encounter and enable you to communicate with German archives more effectively.

Help, I can’t read the script!

The guide also includes links to script tutorials and useful transliteration resources.

Acknowledgements

I am very grateful to Ms Ulrike Kändler. Without her incredibly hard work, dedication and expertise this guide would not exist. Her short period in Oxford leaves a legacy from which Oxford researchers can benefit from for a long time to come.

Trial until 17 January: Frankfurt and Leipzig Book Fair Catalogues online

Oxford users are now invited to trial  the online Frankfurt and Leipzig Book Fair Catalogues. The trial is accessible until 17 January via SOLO and OxLIP+.

messkatalogeThe digitized versions (from microfilm) of the catalogues for the Frankfurt and Leipzig book fairs (Messkataloge), representing an almost complete run from 1594 to 1860.

Please send feedback to alan.coates@bodleian.ox.ac.uk by 17 January 2014. If you have queries regarding access, contact eresources@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

“Book-trade catalogues, generally referred to as book fair catalogues, offer a unique overview of German – and in many respects European – book production over a period of nearly 300 years (1594-1860). This form of information, originally intended for the contemporary book trade, today forms an important and comprehensive historical bibliography of the period.

Developed in the 16th century, the book fair catalogues for the Spring or Easter and Autumn or Michaelmas Fairs provided the widest possible overview of the books on offer during this period. Only when other sources of information began to take their place did they cease publication in 1860.

The digitisation is based on the microfilming of the book fair catalogues from 1594 onwards. To bring the various and astonishingly scattered holdings of different libraries together and create and almost complete run was a major editorial achievement. There were only a few years during the Thirty Years’ War when no catalogues are known to have appeared.” http://www.olmsonline.de/en/kollektionen/messkataloge/

New: Luthers’ Works (Fortress Edition)

Oxford users can now benefit from the newly released latest addition to the InteLex Past Masters collections: the 55-volume set of Luther’s Works in English. It is a monumental translation project published jointly by Fortress Press and Concordia Publishing House in 1957.

Luthers works

The first thirty volumes contain Luther’s expositions of various biblical books, while remaining volumes include his Reformation writings and occasional pieces. The final volume of the set contains an index of quotations, proper names, and topics, and a list of corrections and changes.

This supersedes the CD-ROM which is currently installed on the PC in the HFL Consultation Room, Upper Camera.

Funded by the Philosophy and Theology Librarian, access is now available from OxLIP+ and SOLO.

New: East Germany from Stalinization to the New Economic Policy, 1950-1963

And here’s more good news – and more online resources newly acquired for historians!

Oxford users now also have access to East Germany from Stalinization to the New Economic Policy, 1950-1963. Access is via SOLO (shortly) or OxLIP+.

This publication reproduces the US State Department Decimal Files 762B, 862B and 962B from the General Records of the Department of State, in the custody of the National Archives. It was originally microfilmed as Records of the U.S. Department of State, relating to the Internal Affairs of East Germany.

12 May 1950 - Kenneth Holland note regarding status of historic monuments in East Germany

12 May 1950 – Kenneth Holland note regarding status of historic monuments in East Germany

It specifically looks at in depth the creation of the East German state, living conditions and its people. Documents included in this collection are predominantly instructions to and dispatches from U.S. diplomatic and consular personnel, regarding political, military, economic, social, cultural, industrial and other internal conditions and events in East Germany.

Related resources:

See yesterday’s blog about online access to three East Germany newspapers.

Declassified Documents Reference System US (DDRS). Provides online access to over 500,000 pages of previously classified government documents. Covering major international events from the Cold War to the Vietnam War and beyond, this single source enables users to locate key information underpinning studies in international relations, American studies, United States foreign and domestic policy studies, journalism and more.

Digital National Security Archive (DNSA). Collection: The Berlin Crisis 1958-1962. Beginning with documents from late 1953 when the Eisenhower administration began to formulate its Berlin contingency plans and closing with a series of newly declassified State Department histories from the late 1960s, The Berlin Crisis contains more than 11,500 pages from almost 3,000 documents.

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) 1974-1996 [selections]: Eastern Europe, 1974–1996. The Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Report has been the United States’ principal record of political and historical open source intelligence for nearly 70 years.

3 historical East German newspapers now online

“From advertisements to propaganda to personal interest stories, the newspapers of Communist East Germany are a historical wellspring. Thanks to a four-year digital achiving project, three major papers are now available for free online.” – thus reports Charly Wilder in Digitizing the GDR: East German Papers Offer Glimpse of History Der Spiegel, June 27, 2013.

In ZEFYS (Zeitungsinformationssystem), the DDR-Presse offers access to three historical East German newspapers. They are:

These important historical newspapers therefore cover the period of Soviet occupation 1945-49 and the DDR itself (1949-1990) with also some coverage beyond the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification in 1990.

Neues Deutschland

Financed and published by the SED, it appeared first on 23 April 1946. It reflects strongly party-political views on all matters, also relating to culture, literature, sports and social affairs.

Berliner Zeitung

This is Berlin’s oldest continuous daily, first published as early as 21 May 1945, so very soon as German surrender. Despite being located in the capital and close to the SED, it was able to maintain its own distinct profile.

Neue Zeit

This newspaper was the party newspaper of the conservatives, CDU, in East German. It first appeared on 22 July 1945. It is aimed reach those for the Neues Deutschland did not appeal.

Access

Access is free but you will need to register. If you are a registered reader of the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin (SBB), you can login with the readers card login.

If you are not an SBB reader (like me!), then you need to create an account with xlogon.net. It’s free and quick to do and definitely worth the trouble. See http://zefys.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/ddr-presse/zugang/ for more details. You will need to be able to read your email and confirm the registration in order to complete the process.

Forthcoming resources:

East Germany from Stalinization to the New Economic Policy, 1950-1963 (watch this space!)

This online resource reproduces the State Department Decimal Files 762B, 862B and 962B from the General Records of the Department of State, in the custody of the National Archives. It was originally microfilmed as Records of the U.S. Department of State, relating to the Internal Affairs of East Germany.

It specifically looks at in depth the creation of the East German state, living conditions and its people.  Documents included in this collection are predominantly instructions to and dispatches from U.S. diplomatic and consular personnel, regarding political, military, economic, social, industrial and other internal conditions and events in East Germany.

New: Hitler Quellen 1924-45

I’m delighted to announce that Oxford historians now have online access to Hitler Quellen 1924-45. Access is via SOLO (shortly) and OxLIP+.

Adolf_HitlerCompiling 3 key German sources on Hitler in a single database, this resource gives online access to Hitler: Reden, Schriften, Anordnungen, Februar 1925 bis Januar 1933 (Saur, 1992-) and Hitler : Reden und Proklamationen, 1932-1945 (Max Domarus ed., 1962-1963) as well as documentation of Hitler’s trial for high treason in 1924.

The database can be searched by topic thanks to an integrated subject index; it is also searchable by date, place, name, and publication title. The source texts are in German.

Can’t read German? There is a translation of the second title here: Hitler : speeches and proclamations, 1932-1945 : the chronicle of a dictatorship / [compiled by] Max Domarus ; translated from the German by Mary Fran Gilbert. (London : Tauris, 1990-).

Related resources in Oxford:

Diaries of Joseph Goebbels Online/ Tagebücher von Joseph Goebbels Online (Oxford readers only). Includes a transcription of all handwritten entries from the years 1923 to July 1941 and the subsequent dictations up until 1945. This edition, issued by the Institut für Zeitgeschichte, is based on the reproduction of the entire diaries on glass microfiches – commissioned by Goebbels himself – that was discovered by Elke Fröhlich in the former special archive in Moscow. For the first time, the database gives researchers the chance to access the diaries of Joseph Goebbels electronically using the valuable subject index that until now was available in print only.

Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei (NSDAP): Akten der Partei-Kanzlei der NSDAP [microfiche]: Rekonstruktion eines verlorengegangenen Bestandes; herausgegeben vom Institut für Zeitgeschichte. (München: Saur: Oldenbourg, c1983-1992). [BOD Microfiches 562]

Akten der Reichskanzlei. Regierung Hitler 1933-1945 / bearbeitet von Karl-Heinz Minuth (Boppard am Rhein : Boldt, 1983-)

Der Kirchenkampf: the Gutteridge-Micklem collection at the Bodleian Library, Oxford. 515 microfiches. (London : Saur, [1988]). Includes materials, assembled from private collections, which detail the attempts of the German clergy to maintain a separate identity under the Third Reich. These materials document two struggles: that of the evangelical church against the Nazi attempt to impose a unified Reichskirche; and the struggle within the church to establish and define its own development and structure while under siege. The collection includes books, periodicals, pamphlets, correspondence, reports, memoranda and manuscripts. Most of this material originated in the Bekennende Kirche, but there is also coverage of the Roman Catholic Church, the National Socialists and their various subsections, as well as other German and British Christian churches. Also included are unique manuscripts describing the precarious situation of the pastors, bishops, religious publishers and printers whose lives and livelihoods were threatened by the Third Reich. There are lists of pastors who were imprisoned or suspended from duty, press service reports and banned literature.

Using microfilms and fiches?

Don’t be put off by old technology. There is a shiny new microfilm reader/scanner in the Upper Reading Room, Old Bodleian Library.

Trial until 10 June: Hitler. Quellen 1924-45

Oxford users are now invited to trial Hitler. Quellen 1924-45.

Adolf_HitlerCompiling 3 key German sources on Hitler in a single database, this resource gives online access to Hitler: Reden, Schriften, Anordnungen, Februar 1925 bis Januar 1933 and Hitler : Reden und Proklamationen, 1932-1945 (Max Domarus ed., 1962-1963) as well as documentation of Hitler’s trial for high treason in 1924.

The database can be searched by topic thanks to an integrated subject index; it is also searchable by date, place, name, and publication title.

Undergraduates taking the Special Subject Nazi Germany, a racial order, 1933-45 will find this database particularly useful.

Achtung! Please note that the source texts are all in German.

Comments can be left on the History databases desiderata site or sent to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk by 10 June when the trial ends.

Related resource already available in Oxford:

Diaries of Joseph Goebbels Online/ Tagebücher von Joseph Goebbels Online