New: Early Church Texts

I am pleased to report that Oxford historians now have access to Early Church Texts.

Early-Church-Texts-screenshot

Early Church Texts contains a growing number of original language Greek and Latin texts relating to the Early Church (from the first to the fifth century), including Creeds and Church Councils. The texts have online dictionary links, English translations, a search facility and notes.

It serves also as an encyclopaedia on the first five centuries of church history including information about Christian writers, bishops, emperors, controversies and Church Councils. Around 1,000 people and topics are covered.

Early Church Texts is now accessible via SOLO and Databases A-Z.

New: Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (DMLBS)

I’m pleased to report that following a successful trial, the Classics Librarian has taken out a subscription for the online Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources. It is accessible via SOLO and Databases A-Z.DMLBS - snippet

The Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (DMLBS), the first fascicle of which appeared in 1975 and the 17th and last in 2013, is “the most comprehensive dictionary of Medieval Latin to have been produced and the first ever to focus on British Medieval Latin”. Covering a particularly long period stretching from Gildas (fl. 540) to William Camden (1600), it is “wholly based on original research”, that is to say on the close reading of thousands of Medieval Latin texts. This has been carried out specifically for the purpose of recording their distinctive lexical characteristics, and, as far as possible, using the best available sources, whether original manuscripts or modern critical editions. It is also based on systematic searches within computer databases, including the Library of Latin Texts  (LLT-A and LLT-B), where many of the texts can be found that make up the sources for the DMLBS.

Trial until 21 Nov: Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (DMLBS)

I’m glad to announce that Oxford readers have a month’s trial of the online Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources. It will run for a month and is accessible via Databases A-Z.

The Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (DMLBS), the first fascicle of which appeared in 1975 and the 17th and last in 2013, is “the most comprehensive dictionary of Medieval Latin to have been produced and the first ever to focus on British Medieval Latin”. Covering a particularly long period stretching from Gildas (fl. 540) to William Camden (1600), it is “wholly based on original research”, that is to say on the close reading of thousands of Medieval Latin texts. This has been carried out specifically for the purpose of recording their distinctive lexical characteristics, and, as far as possible, using the best available sources, whether original manuscripts or modern critical editions. It is also based on systematic searches within computer databases, including the Library of Latin Texts  (LLT-A and LLT-B), where many of the texts can be found that make up the sources for the DMLBS.

Please send feedback to Charlotte Goodall, as this will help her to decide whether to take up the subscription in the long-term.

Trial until 12 Nov: Dictionary of Renaissance Latin from Prose Sources / Lexique de la prose latine de la Renaissance Online

The Classics Librarian, Charlotte Goodall, has set up a month-long trial of Dictionary of Renaissance Latin from Prose Sources  (Lexique de la prose latine de la Renaissance Online) which is also accessible via SOLO and Databases A-Z.

An online version of the first dictionary of Renaissance Latin, based on its second revised print edition. It records the vocabulary of over 230 Latin prose authors from different regional backgrounds who wrote between c. 1300 and c. 1600, and gives translations in French and English in approximately 11,000 entries. A standard tool not only for latinists and neo-latinists, but also for historians, philosophers, theologians, historians of law, and intellectual historians working in the fields of Humanism, the Renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation.

Additional material is included in the online dictionary: Introduction, explanation of abbreviations and signs used in the dictionary and bibliography (in html format); Latin authors and texts of the Renaissance used in the dictionary, recapulative appendices of words of non-Latin origin, diminutives, and words classified by certain endings, as well as the original article by René Hoven, ‘Essai sur le vocabulaire néo-latin de Thomas More’ (in French only) are available in PDF format.

Features

  • Search entry in Latin with auto-suggest once two letters have been input.
  • Full text search options in Latin, as well as in French and English.
  • Word wheel gives neighboring entries and quick browsing options
  • Search terms are highlighted in the entry.
  • Definitions are given in French and in English.
  • Source references and abbreviations are expandable upon mouse hover (indicated by underlining).
  • Etymological information is given.
  • Clickable cross-references to other entries.

Please send any feedback to charlotte.goodall@bodleian.ox.ac.uk by 12 November 2015.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Sept 2015 update

DNB_stamp_block logoNew biographies for religious men and women during medieval and Reformation periods and individuals active during the First World War.

The latest update to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography—published on Thursday 17 September 2015—adds biographies of 112 men and women active between the thirteenth and the early twenty-first century.

The new update includes a special focus on men and women active during the First World War—in combat and on the home front—with a particular interest in the events of 1915. New additions include the physicians Louisa Garrett Anderson and Flora Murray who opened the Endell Street Military Hospital, London, in May 1915; it remains the only British army hospital staffed and run by women. Military inventions from 1915 include the bowl-shaped Brodie helmet (named after its designer John Brodie) which went into production 100 years ago this month. By the end of the war, seven million of these helmets had been produced. Other war-time lives include the boy soldier Horace Iles (1900-1916) who was killed at the Somme; his biography is now part of school education programmes run by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

September’s update also concludes a 3-year research project to extend the Oxford DNB’s coverage of the medieval religious—the abbots, abbesses, priors, and prioresses who led England’s religious houses until the Reformation. The project has added 56 first-time biographies. To mark the project’s completion, Professor Claire Cross of York University considers these Lives of the Religious for what they can tell us about medieval monasticism, and how those in office in the 1520s and 1530s responded to the Reformation.

Dr Philip Carter, Publication Editor, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

New ejournal: The Medieval Low Countries, 1, 2014-

I’m pleased to announce that Oxford users now have access to the ejournal The Medieval Low Countries: An Annual Review [ISSN: 2295-3493], issue 1, 2014 onwards.
Medieval Low Countries cover
Published by Brepols Publishers, The Medieval Low Countries is a peer-reviewed journal featuring scholarly articles on the Low Countries (les Pays-Bas) from c 400 AD to c 1500. During this time, the area of roughly modern-day Belgium and The Netherlands was an important political, economic, cultural and religious hub in medieval Europe.

The journal is published annually and its scholarly articles cover a wide range of disciplines (history, law, religion, art, architecture, literature, etc.). The topics are often interdisciplinary and usually in either French or English. Book reviews are also published.

If you want to keep up-to-date with this journal, just sign up to a New Issue Alerting.

Table of contents for issue 1 (2014):

  • Jean-Francois Nieus et Steven Vanderputten, ‘Diplôme princier, matrice de faux, acte modèle. Le règlement d’avouerie du comte Baudoin V pour Saint-Bertin (1042) et ses réappropriations sous l’abbatiat réformateur de Lambert (1095-1123)’.
  • Aart Noordzij, ‘The wars of the lord of Bronkhorst: Territory, lordship and the proliferation of violence in fourteenth-century Guelders’.
  • Rombert Stapel and Jenine de Vries, ‘Leydis, Pauli, and Berchen revisited. Collective history writing in the Low Countries in the late fifteenth century’.
  • Tom Gaens, ‘Acquiring religious perfection outside a vow. The Carthusian institution of the donati in late-medieval reformist communities and the Modern Devotion’.
  • Mario Damen, ‘Patricians, knights, or nobles? Historiography and social status in late-medieval Antwerp’.
  • Hans Mol, ‘The Cistercian model? The application of the grange system by the various religious orders in the Frisian coastal area, 1150-1400’.
  • Book reviews

Other recently subscribed to ejournals for medievalists:

New: Loeb Classical Library online

Loeb - Confessions - coverI am pleased to report that thanks to the Classics Librarian Oxford readers now have access to the Loeb Classical Library online via OxLIP+ and soon via SOLO. Over 520 volumes of useful sources materials for historians are now available in both Latin and Greek with parallel English translations.

The Digital Loeb Library is an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing, virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Epic and lyric poetry; tragedy and comedy; history, travel, philosophy, and oratory; the great medical writers and mathematicians; those Church Fathers who made particular use of pagan culture—in short, our entire Greek and Latin Classical heritage is represented here with up-to-date texts and accurate English translations.

Catalogue records for the individual volumes will also soon be added to SOLO.

Related resources

New: Brepols Miscellanea Online – Essays in Medieval Studies

Mediavalists will be delighted to know that a major resource has now become available to Oxford readers.

Brepols Miscellanea Online – Essays in Medieval Studies provides online access to over 5,000 book chapters and articles on medieval studies published in Brepols publications since 1998. It includes books published in series such as Culture et société médiévales, Europa Sacra, Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy, Medieval Church Studies, Collection d’études médiévales de Nice, Studies in European Urban History (1100-1800) and more.

*Important: please note that not all volumes in a series have been digitised. Look out for the green box!

Brepols Miscellanea Online - screenshotA wide range of subject areas are represented: Archaeology, Art History, European Languages and Literatures, History of Science, Manuscript Studies, Medievalism, Music History, Philosophy, Social and Economic History, and Theology.

You can search for articles and books in a variety of ways as well as browse by subject area.

The articles are indexed in the International Medieval Bibliography which is also available to Oxford users.

Brepols Miscellanea Online – Essays in Medieval Studies can be access via SOLO and Databases A-Z.

Other recently received medieval resources

New ejournal: Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies, 1 (2012) –

I’m delighted to report that Oxford users now have access to the online Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies [ISSN 2034-3515], vol. 1 (2012) to current.

journal of medieval monastic studies - coverThis journal focuses work on monasticism throughout medieval Europe. This peer-reviewed journal is published annually, is international and interdisciplinary in scope. The journal will include scholarly contributions on monastic history, archaeology and architectural history, art history, literature, etc, as well as relevant book reviews and shorter notices.

The 20 members of the editorial board include experts in history, archaeology, art history and theology, covering all of medieval Europe. The language of publication will be English, but abstracts in the original language of individual contributions may be included.

Access is via SOLO or OU eJournals.

Vol 2 (2013) Table of contents

  • Translation, Controversies, and Adaptations at St Sabas Monastery during the Sixth Century – Augustine Casiday
  • The Monk as Mourner: Gendered Eastern Christian Self-Identity in the Seventh Century – Hannah Hunt
  • ‘No One Can Serve Two Masters’: Abbots and Arch-Abbots in the Monastic Networks at the End of the Eleventh Century – Guido Cariboni
  • A Norbert for England: Holy Trinity and the Invention of Robert of Knaresborough – Joshua Easterling
  • English Benedictine Monks at the Papal Court in the Thirteenth Century: The Experience of Thomas of Marlborough in a Wider Context – Jane Sayers
  • The Monastic Ideal of Discipline and the Making of Clerical Rules in Late Medieval Castile – Susana Guijarro
  • Questions and Answers on the Birgittine Rule: A Letter from Vadstena to Syon Abbey 1421 – Elin Andersson
  • Reviews
    • The Knights Hospitaller in the Levant, c. 1070–1309 (by Jonathan Riley-Smith) – Andrew Jotischky
    • Odiosa sanctitas. St Peter Damian, Simony, and Reform (by William D. McCready) – Ralf Lutzelschwab
    • The Origin, Development, and Refinement of Medieval Religious Mendicancy (ed. by Donald S. Prudlo) – Hans-Joachim Schmidt
    • Survival and Success on Medieval Borders: Cistercian Houses in Medieval Scotland and Pomerania from the Twelfth to the Late Fourteenth Century (by Emilia Jamroziak) – Piotr Gorecki
    • The Benedictines in the Middle Ages (by James G. Clark) – Jorg Sonntag
    • Churches in Early Medieval Ireland: Architecture, Ritual and Memory (by Tomas O Carragain) – Anne Muller
    • The Gothic and Catholicism: Religion, Cultural Exchange and the Popular Novel, 1785–1829 (by Maria Purves) – Veronica Ortenberg West-Harling
    • Female ‘vita religiosa’ between Late Antiquity and the High Middle Ages: Structures, Developments and Spatial Contexts (ed. by Gert Melville and Anne Muller) – Alison I. Beach
    • Custodians of Continuity? The Premonstratensian Abbey at Barlings and the Landscape of Ritual (by Paul Everson and David Stocker) – David Austin
    • Inventing Sempringham: Gilbert of Sempringham and the Origins of the Role of the Master (by Katharine Sykes) – Alison I. Beach

Other recently received medieval resources

New: Medieval Sermon Studies, 50 (1) 2006- is now online

I’m pleased to report that Oxford readers now have online access to Medieval Sermon Studies [ISSN 1366-0691] from 50 (1) 2006 onwards.

Medieval Sermon Studies - coverPublished annually by Maney Publishing on behalf of the International Medieval Sermon Studies Society, this refereed journal contains articles on the study of medieval sermons, preaching in Latin and the vernacular languages within their social, literary, religious, intellectual, theological, catechetical, political and historical contexts. It also aims to foster the study of various artes praedicandi, and theories of preaching derived from them, as well as material used by sermon writers (e.g. Florilegia, commentaries, etc.).

This will be of interest to medievalists working in the field of religious culture, history, and literature.

Amongst others, it is indexed in ATLA with ATLASerials and MLA International Bibliography.

Access is via SOLO or OU eJournals.

Other recently received medieval resources