New Bodleian History Books: December 2018 – Writing “macrohistory”

The concept of “total history” is not a new one – the “histoire totale” advocated by Fernand Braudel of the Annales School in the 1940s introduced a historiography which strove to observe the long and medium-term evolution of economy, society and civilisation, and thus avoid the tunnel vision created by separating economic, political, social and other forms of history. For the late 20th and the 21st century, the historian David Christian has gone even further in the idea of what timeframe “history” should be looking at, coining the term Big History for a multidisciplinary approach which encompasses everything from the Big Bang to the present, an integrated history of the cosmos, earth, life, and humanity as a whole.

But scale in historiography of course also goes the other way – “microhistory” uses investigations of small and well-defined units of research (such as a single event, a single individual or a single small community) to eventually ask these same larger questions about society or humanity.

Somewhere inbetween the two extremes lie studies that have recently been termed “macrohistory” – not as ambitious as to claim to be “total” or “big” history, but going well beyond the scale of microhistory in their scope. Over the last few months a number of the new History books arrived at the Bodleian have been of this kind of historiography – studies which span an ambitiously large time frame, and therefore elude categorizing into such traditional historical eras as “Antiquity”, “medieval history”, “early modern history” or “modern history”.

Still very much on a trend towards “histoire totale” for individual countries are for example John Julius Norwich’s History of France and the Storia mondiale dell’Italia edited by Andrea Giardina which trace developments from Roman times to the present; and Richard Bressler aims to write a similarly wide-ranging history for a rather more delineated timeframe, but for the entire world in The Thirteenth Century.

Several recent studies in the area of History of Science and Medicine aim for a similarly comprehensive account across the centuries while focussing on one specific aspect or subject – Mechanics from Aristotle to Einstein run from the 4th century BC via Descartes, Galileo, and Newton to the 20th century; the History of Forensic Medicine traces the science from its beginnings in Ancient China and Rome to its history in individual countries from Japan to Europe and the U.A.E., and The Ambulance – a history reviews 800 years of ambulance services, including the vehicles used and the individuals who served on them.

A number of newly arrived studies in Social History, too, conduct their discussions on a similarly ambitious scale: Michelle Perrot’s The Bedroom. An Intimate History discusses the importance of this one room for the history of mankind (and womankind) from Greek and Roman antiquity to today; Rob Boddice’s History of Emotions (also available online as eLD) looks at how emotions change over time, cause historical events, or influence human morality; Nikos Panou’s Evil Lords (also available online) examines tyrants and tyranny from Antiquity to the Renaissance, and Séverine Auffret writes Une histoire du féminisme, tracing the movement from Antiquity to the present day.

You can access the RSS feed for items tagged with “macrohistory” in the Bodleian History collections here.

New Bodleian History Books: November 2018 – WWI

Right on schedule for the Centenary of the First World War a number of exciting new history books on various interesting aspects of WWI have arrived at the Bodleian!

In Ypres Mark Connelly and Stefan Goebel examine the small Belgian city which between 1914 and 1918 became the location of five major battles between the Allied troops and the Germans – battles which resulted in hundreds of thousands of casualties, and placed Ypres at the heart of First World War battlefield tourism.

Opening his focus to the entirety of the Western Front rather a single battlefield, David T. Zabecki’s The generals’ war: operational level command on the Western Front in 1918 examines the plans and decisions of the senior-most German and Allied commanders, exploring the military strategies of those generals during the last year of the Great War.

And not from the generals’ view, but from the complete opposite side of the spectrum come Les carnets de guerre de Louis Barthas: 1914-1918. This is an edition of the 19 notebooks compiled by a French corporal who fought for four years in some of the most dangerous sectors of the front, including Verdun and the Somme. Into these notebooks Barthas transcribed his diary and letters, adding collected picture postcards, illustrations, and maps clipped from newspapers and magazines.

Unlike these first books which examine the war and WWI warfare proper, several of the newly arrived books focus on the social and cultural history of WWI. Laura Rowe writes on Morale and discipline in the Royal Navy during the First World War, and Roger L. Ransom examines the dark history of war profiteering in Gambling on war: confidence, fear, and the tragedy of the First World War

Along with socio-cultural history, gender studies are also gaining a foothold in war historiography – while all of the above monographs focus rather naturally on the (male) soldiers and their (male) commanders, the final pair of books I would like to present in this blog post take as their topic the often neglected “other half” of humanity involved in the Great War – the women.

Alison Fell’s Women as veterans in Britain and France after the First World War looks at former nurses, charity workers, secret service agents, members of resistance networks in occupied territory or of the British auxiliary corps. After the end of the war these women appropriated the cultural identity of “female war veteran” in order to have greater access to public life in a political climate in which women were rarely heard on the public stage.

Similarly, the women Stefania Bartoloni writes on in Donne di fronte alla guerra: pace, diritti e democrazia (1878-1918) demanded more rights and more democracy and called for women’s participation in decisions on national and international affairs. Beginning at the end of the 19th century but continuing through to the end of WWI, this group of feminists and suffragists critiqued the male power system in which men were the heads of governments and diplomacy who chose to settle conflicts between nations through the instrument of war.

If you would like to be updated on new books on WWI, subscribe to our LibraryThing RRS feed here!

 

 

New Books at the HFL

As it’s Black History Month, we would like to highlight new books purchased by the library which explore black history. Covering a range of topics from racial integration, slavery in the Atlantic and Black intellectual voices in the U.S. You can find these books on the New Books Display in the Upper Gladstone Link.

For a full list of recent acquisitions, including other topics, click on the image below:

Gershenhorn, Louis Austin and the Carolina Times: a life in the long black freedom struggle (2018, Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina Press)

Harrigan, Frontiers of Servitude: Slavery in Narratives of the Early French Atlantic (2018, Manchester, Manchester University Press)

Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern US History (2018, Santa Barbara, Praege)

Blackett, The captive’s quest for freedom : fugitive slaves, the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, and thepolitics of slavery (2018, New York, Cambridge University Press)

Horne, The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism: the roots of slavery, white supremacy, and capitalism in seventeenth century North America and the Caribbean (2018, New York, Monthly Review Press)

Walker, The Burning House (2018, New Haven, Yale University Press)

 

There are more! Find them here.

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If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

 

New Books at the HFL

Mes amies, de rien! The library has recently purchased new books on French History, from an account of Napoleon’s life during the very eventful years of 1805-1810, to a reassessment of Thomas Paine’s influence on the French Revolution and much more.

For a full list of recent acquisitions, including other topics, click on the image below:

Broers, Napoleon. Volume 2, The spirit of the age, 1805-1810 (2018, London, Faber & Faber)

Cusimano, Selected works of Abbot Suger of Saint-Denis (2018, Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America Press)

Park, Papal protection and the crusader : Flanders, Champagne, and the kingdom of France, 1095-1222 (2018,  Woodbridge, The Boydell Press)

Sowerwine, France since 1870 : culture, politics and society (2018, London, Palgrave Macmillan)

Millington, Fighting for France : violence in interwar French politics (2018, Oxford, OUP)

Clark, Thomas Paine : Britain, America, and France in the age of enlightenment and revolution (2018, Oxford, OUP)

There are more! Find them here.

You will also find our New Books Display in the Upper Gladstone Link.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Books Recently Added to the History Faculty Library

Your prayers have been answered! The library has recently bought books on Catholic History, from Catholic revolutionaries in Poland and France to a history of the Second Vatican Council and much more.

For a full list of recent acquisitions, including other topics, click on the image below:

Kosicki. Catholics on the barricades : Poland, France, and “revolution”, 1891-1956 (2018, New Haven, YUP)

Pollard. Catholicism in modern Italy : religion, society and politics since 1861 (2008, Abingdon, Routledge)

Walser-Smith. Protestants, Catholics and Jews in Germany, 1800-1914

Farrelly, Anti-Catholicism in America, 1620-1860 (2018, Cambridge, CUP)

Tallett. Catholicism in Britain and France since 1789 (1996, London, Hambledon Press)

Alberigo. History of Vatican II (1995-2006, Maryknoll, Orbis)

There are more! Find them here.

You will also find our New Books Display in the Upper Gladstone Link.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

New Books: contesting the United Kingdom and the history of sexuality

This month sees the introduction of a selection of texts on Scotland, Wales, Ireland and Northern Ireland, with topics including prominent (often divisive) political figures, rebellions, changing political landscapes and debates on national identity and autonomy. In addition, we’ve acquired materials on the history of sex and sexuality, highlighting discussions on gender identity and shifting social and cultural representations of the human body.

For a full list of recent acquisitions, click on the image below:

 

Dorr, Noel. Sunningdale: the search for peace in Northern Ireland. (2017, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy)

McAllister, Laura. Plaid Cymru: the emergence of a political party. (2001, Bridgend : Seren)

Torrance, David. Whatever happened to Tory Scotland? (2012, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press)

Adams, James E. Dandies and Desert Saints: styles of Victorian masculinity. (1995, London: Ithaca)

Cook, Matt. et al. A Gay History of Britain: love and sex between men since the Middle Ages. (2007, Oxford: Greenwood World)

Feinberg, Leslie. Transgender Warriors: making history from Joan of Arc to Dennis Rodman (1996, Boston, Massachusetts: Beacon Press)

There are more! Find them here.

 

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

 

Newly received History books: South America, Black Tudors, Samurai, the Atlantic World and more

Another week another selection of books recently added to the HFL collection. This week includes a number of books on South American political history alongside titles on the Samurai and Japan, race in Tudor England, and a history of homosexuality in our capital. Click the image below to be taken to a full list of recently aquired items.

Sader, Emir. – Without fear of being happy : Lula, the Workers Party and Brazil (1991 | London : Verso)

O’Shaughnessy, Hugh. – The priest of Paraguay : Fernando Lugo and the making of a nation (2009 | London : Zed)

Kaufmann, Miranda. – Black Tudors : the untold story (2017 | London : Oneworld)

Ikegami, Eiko. – The taming of the samurai : honorific individualism and the making of modern Japan (1995 | Cambridge, Mass ; London : Harvard University Press)

Egerton, Douglas R – The Atlantic world : a history, 1400-1888 (2007 | Wheeling, Ill. : Harlan Davidson)

Ackroyd, Peter. – Queer city : Gay London from the romans to the present day (2017 | London : Chatto & Windus)

There are more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

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If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Newly received History books: German art and war, white slavery, cultural assimilation and an English master.

Below is a small selection of new books that have been added to our collections in the past fortnight, this week’s selection isn’t themed but does include a varied selection of social, cultural and art history.

Potter, Pamela Maxine, Art of suppression : confronting the Nazi past in histories of the visual and performing arts (University of California Press, 2016)

Hales, Petrescu and Weinstein (eds.), Continuity and crisis in German cinema, 1928-1936 (New York : Camden House, 2016)

Merritt, Keri Leigh, Masterless men : poor whites and slavery in the antebellum South (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Wiese and Wilhelm (eds.) American Jewry : transcending the European experience? (London : Bloomsbury Academic, 2017)

Woods, Gregory, Homintern : how gay culture liberated the modern world (Yale University Press, 2016)

Shanes, Eric, Young Mr Turner : the first forty years, 1775-1815 (Yale University Press, 2016)

 

There are more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Newly received History books: Egyptian maths, Medieval Wales, Martin Luther, 19th century Europe, Royal Navy & Cold War

In this week’s batch of new History books, I selected titles relevant for most periods. There are also two much-anticipated books by the two Regius Professors of History from Cambridge and Oxford, Prof. R. Evans and Prof. L. Roper. Enjoy!

Imhausen, Annette, Mathematics in ancient Egypt : a contextual history (Princeton, 2016)

Stephenson, David, Medieval Powys kingdom, principality and lordships, 1132-1293 (Woodbridge, 2016)

Roper, Lyndal, Martin Luther : renegade and prophet (London, 2016)

Evans, Richard J., The pursuit of power : Europe 1815-1914 (London, 2016)

Bennett, G. H., The Royal Navy in the age of austerity 1919-22 : naval and foreign policy under Lloyd George (London, 2016)

Spohr, Kristina, Transcending the Cold War : summits, statecraft, and the dissolution of bipolarity in Europe, 1970-1990 (Oxford, 2016)

new-history-books-20-sept-2016There is more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.

Newly received History books: Frederick III of Sicily, early modern Naples, Mussilini’s Italy, Matteo

After a German and then a French week of selected books, here is an Italian selection of history books spanning the medieval period right to the late 20th century.

Hamel, Pasquale, Il lungo regno : vita avventurosa di Federico III, re di Sicilia (Soveria Mannelli : Rubbettino, 2014)

D’Avenia, Fabrizio, La Chiesa del re : monarchia e papato nella Sicilia spagnola (secc. XVI-XVII) (Roma : Carocci editore, 2014)

Brancaccio, Giovanni ; Musi, Aurelio, Il Regno di Napoli nell’età di Filippo IV (1621-1665) (Milano : Guerini e associati, 2014)

Da Molin, Giovanna, Storia sociale dell’Italia moderna (Brescia: Editrice La scuola, 2014)

Morena, Antonio, Mussolini’s decennale : aura and mythmaking in fascist Italy (Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2015)

Pasquino, Gianfranco; Venturino, Fulvio, Il Partito democratico secondo Matteo (Bologna : Bononia University Press, 2014)

New History books 7 Sept 2016There is more!

Many more new books were received. You can find them all here.

Personalise your alerts

If you would like a personalised RSS feed so you can be alerted to our new history books, just email isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk with your preferred period, country or topic.