New: The Waterloo Directories of English, Irish and Scottish Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (series 3)

Oxford researchers working on Victorian periodical literature may have noticed the recent absence of our access to Waterloo Directory of English Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (Oxford researchers only).

 

I am very pleased report that access to a more updated online version (series 3) is now available to our readers via OxLIP+ and also via SOLO shortly.

Furthermore, you will now also have online access to The Waterloo Directory of Irish Newspapers and Periodicals:1800-1900 (series 3) and The Waterloo Directory of Scottish Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (series 3).

Please note these doesn’t work well with Internet Explorer (IE).

All three resources are an alphabetical listing and description of 19th century newspaper and periodical publications in England, Scotland and Ireland covering all fields, including the arts, sciences, culture, professions, industry, finance, trades, labour, agriculture, entertainment, sports, church, women and children.

Between them, the directories include approximately 86,000 titles from 4,600 towns, lists 85,000 personal names and covers over 2,000 subjects.

As well as being an ongoing project to record the bibliographic record of Victorian periodical publications, tracking innumerable title changes for instance, it is indispensable for those studying the all-important context of periodical literature during an important historical period.

Each entry provides details of how and where the title is indexed, title changes, editor, proprietor/publisher/printer, key contributors, political and religious orientation, size, price, circulation, and frequency. It is therefore a useful resource to discover the editorial policy and political leanings of newspapers.

There is some overlap between the three directories, especially where a periodical was issued from multiple or different locations in the course of time.

The resource can be searched by title, issuing body, people, town, county, and subject as well as combine searches in advanced searching or doing a global searching.

It is currently not possible to search across all three Directories.

Also useful:

New: Brepols Medieval Collection

I am pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have access to Brepols Medieval Collection, a major electronic resource for medievalists. It provides online access to books and articles in key subject areas in European Medieval Studies such as Church History & Monasticism, Language and Literature, Manuscript Studies, Philosophy, Theology and History of Science.

This resource was funded thanks to the generosity of the Madeline Barber Bequest.

It comprises two main parts:

  • Medieval Collection (559+ Brepols monographs).
  • Medieval Miscellanea Collection (5,000+ book chapters and articles in miscellanies Brepols publications since 1998) – this replaces Brepols Miscellanea Online: Essays in Medieval Studies

Books included are published in series such as Culture et société médiévales, Europa Sacra, Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy, Medieval Church Studies, Collection d’études médiévales de Nice, Studies in European Urban History (1100-1800) and more. Please note that not all volumes in a series may have been digitised.

The monographs will currently not be catalogued in SOLO (under investigation). I would expect the books and articles to be indexed in the International Medieval Bibliography (IMB) (Oxford users only). To find Brepols publications in IMB, add “Brepols” to the All Field in Advanced Search.

Please note that you will be directed to the Brepols Online portal which will also include ebooks outwith Brepols Medieval Collection. Look out for the green button which indicates free access:

Also useful:

More library news for medievalists.

New: e-access to Beiträge zur Rechtsgeschichte Österreichs

I’m pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have online access to Beiträge zur Rechtsgeschichte Österreichs, 1, 2011-.

Founded in 2011 by the Kommission für Rechtsgeschichte Österreichs (KRGÖ) of the Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften and published twice a year, this peer-reviewed academic journal specialises on the legal history of Austria covering all periods, medieval to contemporary. Research will include legal history of modern day Austria but also the Austrian monarchy and its former Habsburg territories (e.g. modern day Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia).

All aspects of legal history are covered (constitutional law, criminal law, civil law) as well as legal doctrine, comparative law, sociology and political science.

Journal issues are often thematically arranged:

Band 2016/2: Gerichtsvielfalt in Wien. Forschungen zum modernen Gerichtsbegriff
Band 2015/2: Frühneuzeitliche Supplikationspraxis und monarchische Herrschaft in europäischer Perspektive
Band 2014/2: Zwischen Wien und Czernowitz
Band 2013/2: recht [durch] setzen / Making Things Legal: Gesetzgebung und prozessuale Wirklichkeit in den europäischen Rechtstraditionen
Band 2013/1: Appellation und Revision im Europa des Spätmittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit
Band 2012/1: Eherecht 1811 bis 2011. Historische Entwicklungen und aktuelle Herausforderungen
Band 2011/1: Testamente aus der Habsburgermonarchie. Alltagskultur, Recht, Überlieferung

Access is via SOLO or OU eJournals

New ejournal Food & History, 1, (2003)-

Oxford readers can now access all issues for Food & History [ISSN 1780-3187] online.

An academic journal published since 2003 by the Institut Européen d’Histoire et des Cultures de l’Alimentation (IEHCA), Food & History is the leading specialised journal in Europe in the field of food history. It covers all periods, from ancient history to post-modern times.

“The journal studies food history (from prehistory to the present), food archaeology, and food culture from different points of view. It embraces social, economic, religious, political, agronomical, and cultural aspects of food and nutrition. It deals at the same time with questions of food consumption, production and distribution, with nutrition theories and practices (medical aspects included), with food-related paraphernalia and infrastructures, as well as with culinary practices, gastronomy, and restaurants. Being positioned at the cross-roads of the humanities and social sciences, the review deliberately promotes interdisciplinary research approaches. Although most contributions are concerned with European food history, the journal principally also welcomes articles on other food cultures.” From http://www.hsozkult.de/journals/id/zeitschriften-575, accessed 21 April 2017.

The journal is listed in SOLO and Oxford eJournals. Articles are indexed in the Bibliography of British & Irish History (BBIH) and Historical Abstracts.

New: Churchill Archive

I am pleased to announce that Oxford researchers now have access to the Churchill Archive. This resource, published by Bloomsbury Publishing in collaboration with the Churchill Archives Centre (Cambridge), is a signification collection providing access to more than 800,000 pages of original documents of Winston S. Churchill’s private papers, produced between 1874 and 1965. They include speeches, private letters, telegrams, manuscripts and government transcripts.

This resource is relevant for students and researchers of modern history, politics and international affairs. It is accessible via SOLO and OxLIP+.

CHUR 5/8/145-162     –    19 Sep 1946
Winston Churchill: “The Tragedy of Europe”
Speech notes for WSC’s speech (19 September, University of Zurich)

Accompanying the resource are specially-commissioned articles, as well as reading lists and bibliographies.

Readers can search the collection by topic, by person, by place or by period.

Also useful:

New: Brill’s Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

brill-enc-of-ma-onlineOxford medievalists, you will be delighted to know that you now have online access to Brill’s Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages. Access is via OxLIP+ and soon also via SOLO.

This authoritative reference work covers medieval European history, culture, religious and intellectual life, and technology, 400-1500 AD. It is an English translation of the 2013 update of the well-known German-language “Enzyklopädie des Mittelalters”, which was originally published by Primus Verlag / Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft in 2008.

Transnational and interdisciplinary in approach, topics cover current art and architecture, medicine, and law, archaeology, ecclesiastical history, and languages and literature. They focus not on “event” history but on the comparative study of wider processes and problems.

Articles are thematically organised and supported by extensive bibliographies. The themes are:

1. Society
2. Faith and Knowledge
3. Literature
4. Fine Arts and Music
5. Economy
6. Technology
7. Living Environments and Conditions
8. Constitutive Historical Events and Regions

There are alphabetical indices of authors and of contributors.

Also of interest:

New: Country Life Archive (1897-2005) & Country Life Picture Library

country-life-cover-29-may-1969

Front page. (1969, May 29). Country Life (Archive : 1901 – 2005), ProQuest, accessed 21 Sept. 2016

I am pleased to report that Oxford historians now have access to Country Life Archive, covering 1897 to 2005.

Country Life is a well-known weekly British culture and lifestyle magazine, founded in 1897 by Edward Hudson, friend of Gertrude Jekyll and patron of Edwin Lutyens.

It focuses on fine art and architecture, the great country houses and their interiors, church and historic buildings, landscapes, rural living and leisure pursuits such as antique collecting, farming, hunting, shooting, horse riding and gardening.

country-life-photo-of-mrs-cooper-key-18-jan-1941

Country Life (1941, Jan 18). Country Life (Archive : 1901 – 2005), ProQuest.

The magazine also reported on national events, governmental policy relating to agricultural affairs as well as society affairs of rural gentry.

Country Life is rich in advertising of, for instance, properties and as such is a valuable source in retracing the history of houses as well as finding images of them. Other advertising includes services and equipment needed for country living.

A highly visual resource, every page is full-text searchable, and reproduced in high-resolution and full colour.

The advanced search functionality includes the ability to search for specific images such as photos of interiors and exteriors or architectural drawings / plans.

country-life-advert-18-jan-1941

K L G. (1941, Jan 18). Country Life (Archive : 1901 – 2005), ProQuest, accessed 21 Sept. 2016

Country Life Picture Library contains images of country houses and gardens, interiors and architectural details, historic buildings and churches from the photo-archive of Country Life magazine. All images reference the original Country Life articles for which they were commissioned. Please note that images themselves can only be used upon registration, ordering and payment.

Both the Country Life Archive and Country Life Picture Library are now available on OxLIP+ to our readers. It will be added to SOLO shortly.

New OA journal: Medieval Worlds, 1 (2015)-

Medieval Worlds (ISSN: 2412-3196) is an Open Access double‐blind peer reviewed journal open accesscovering interdisciplinary and transcultural studies of the Middle Ages. It is published semi-annually the Austrian Academy of Science (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (ÖAW)) and is licensed under the Creative‐Commons‐Attribution NonCommercial‐NoDerivs 4.0 Unported (CC BY‐NC‐ND 4.0).

The journal “encourages and links comparative research between different regions and fields and promotes methodological innovation in transdisciplinary studies. Focusing on the Middle Ages (c. 400 ‐ 1500 CE, but can be extended whenever thematically fruitful or appropriate) medieval worlds takes a global approach to studying history in a comparative setting.

Building upon studies of transcultural relations and processes of cultural hybridization between cultures, both of which have seen dynamic developments in recent years, the main approach chosen by medieval worlds is comparative. Taking such a comparative approach will not only allow researchers to highlight the global interaction within, or hybrid nature of particular cultural spheres, but also shed new light on more specific fields of interest. Moreover, medieval worlds will encourage a critical debate between the disciplines concerning approaches and methods, and thus will help to enrich the methodological frameworks of comparative history.” From http://www.medievalworlds.net/medieval_worlds, accessed 13 Sept 2016.

This journal will be soon added to SOLO and OU eJournals.

New: The Cold War: Global Perspectives on East-West Tensions, 1945-1991

Cold War - Readex - frontpageThanks to colleagues in the Social Science Library, modern historians now have access to The Cold War: Global Perspectives on East-West Tensions, 1945-1991.

This resource is a digital archive of international primary source documents on the Cold War, spanning five decades, and will be of interest to anyone researching 20th-century global studies.

Cold War - Readex - screenshot

The sources seem to be a selection of FBIS (Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports) documents, i.e. these are CIA monitored, recorded, and translated coverage of the Cold War in foreign media and government publications. They covers newspapers, magazines, radio broadcasts, television broadcasts, books, government reports, and more.

If you are looking for similar English-language Cold War sources, you might also be interested in…

New: Gallup Analytics – US public opinion data since 1935 & world polls since 2005

Gallup Analytics - landing pageI am delighted to announce that Social Science Library colleagues have subscribed to  Gallup Analytics. It is now accessible via SOLO or OxLIP+.

Note that the subscription is limited to only one user at a time so here’s a plea to close your browser when you are finished or are going for a cup of tea so that others can access it.

Gallup Analytics is a searchable resource of unique public opinion data and analysis compiled by Gallup, Inc. It includes answers to more than 125,000 questions, and responses from more than 3.5 million people interviewed in the Unites States since 1935.

With this data resource you can:

  • perform detailed searches on hundreds of U.S. and global metrics
  • examine data by demographic and socio-economic groups, including income, education, age and gender
  • export data to create custom data tables, trends, charts and scatter plots

Gallup Analytics comes in three parts:

  1. Gallup Brain (historic surveys going back to 1935)
  2. Gallup World Poll (surveys from 160+ countries since 2005)
  3. Gallup Daily Tracking (daily surveys across the US since 2008).

Gallup Brain (historic content 1935-2000s)

Historians are most likely going to be interested in Gallup Brain. As it’s not very obvious how to find it, here are some tips:
To access the historic content, click on Gallup Brain (bottom of the homepage)

Gallup Analytics - GallupBrain for historic data

You can browse surveys by decade or search by keyword:

GallupBrain - 1940s

Gallup World Poll (post-2005 surveys)

Here is an example where I’ve asked for mapped EU responses in which EU country immigrants would find a “good place”. Comparing it to 2016 makes a very interesting comparison!

Immigrants – European Union: 55% (2006) Good place – Aggregate

Immigrants – European Union: 55% (2006) Good place – Aggregate

Modernists can find surveys which cover many other topics, amongst others:
  • economic confidence
  • employment
  • entrepreneurial energy
  • confidence in leadership
  • confidence in military and police
  • religion
  • food access
  • corruption
  • freedom of media
  • life evaluations