Gale Ambassador Scheme – Deadline extended to 15th July!

The deadline for Gale’s Ambassador Scheme has been extended to Monday 15th July!

Don’t know what the Ambassador Scheme is? See our blog post here!

This is a paid opportunity to gain experience with a Global Publisher, working with such resources as the Times Digital Archive, Eighteenth-Century Collections Online and State Papers Online. Apply today at the Gale Ambassadors Site

The Gale Ambassador Scheme

Gale is a global publisher of digital archives and other library resources such as eBooks.

The Gale Ambassador Scheme might be of interest to graduates using Cengage / Gale resources (Times Digital Archive, ECCO, State Paper Online, etc) and who are in Oxford 2019-2020. It offers paid business experience with a global publisher.

Gale Ambassadors are paid £500, plus the role is also great for your CV…

  • Business experience – work directly with staff at a global publisher
  • Get published on our company blog – creating great, shareable evidence of your work
  • Run your own marketing activities – refine copy and post placement to make successful use of social media
  • Speak at subject society events and lectures – public speaking experience is always great for a CV
  • Discover more primary sources for your own essays – potentially improving your grades
  • Opportunities for in-house work experience with a global publisher

The deadline for applications is Monday 1st July.

Applications are made online at the Gale Ambassadors site.

Example blog posts of this year’s Gale Ambassadors are at:

Early modernists: Learn how to use State Papers Online (SPO) (webcast)

Researchers and students working on early modern history will usually, at some point or other, come across the need to use State Papers Online (SPO) which is accessible via SOLO and Databases A-Z. SPO a wonderfully rich source database but not easy to use and the extent of the content is not always fully understood. Oxford researchers now have access to a webcast of a 1h12m long training session with Cengage’s trainer Caroline Beckford and a few historians, 3 May 2018, 1.30-3pm, Lecture Theatre, History Faculty.

The training session goes into some detail explaining the content of the materials that have been digitised (letters, treaties, maps, plans, etc.) and how to find them. If you want to learn more about SPO and have an hour to spare, then I highly recommend watching the webcast from the comfort of your armchair and a cup of tea by your side.

What is State Papers Online?

SPO contains the Tudor and Stuart governments “domestic” and “foreign” papers – the equivalent of today’s documents from the Home and Foreign Offices and the Royal Archives. These everyday working papers of the British royal government reveal Tudor and Stuart society and government, religion and politics in all its drama allowing scholars to trace the remarkable – and frequently violent – transformations of the 16th & 17th centuries.

This major resource re-unites the Domestic, Foreign, Borders, Scotland, and Ireland State Papers of Britain with the Registers of the Privy Council and other State Papers now housed in the Cotton, Harley and Lansdowne collections in the British Library. The papers are digitised images and are accompanied by the Calendars. The Calendars State Papers are fully searchable, and each Calendar entry has been linked directly to its related State Paper.

Charter for the Levant Company, [Jan 7] 1591; Document:SP 97/2 ff. 159-60 – State Papers Online (accessed 10 April 2010)

Among the Calendars included are the HMC Calendars and the Haynes/Murdin transcriptions of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House.

SPO is relevant to those studying Early Modern British and European history: diplomatic, political, social, cultural, local, legal, religious, kingship and queenship, exploration, travel and trade and early empire; Early Modern literature; Renaissance and Reformation Studies; Tudor & Stuart history.

Also of interest

Visual History Archive workshop (USC Shoah Foundation, Centre for Advanced Genocide Research)

Tuesday February 26, 2019 2pm–4pm

Ho Tim Seminar Room University of Oxford China Centre (Dickson Poon Building, Canterbury Road)

No booking required!

The Visual History Archive® is USC Shoah Foundation’s online portal that allows users to search through and view more than 55,000 video testimonies of survivors and witnesses of genocide. Initially a repository of Holocaust testimony, the Archive has expanded significantly to also include survivor and witness testimony from other genocidal events: the Armenian Genocide (1915-1923), the Nanjing Massacre (1937), the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda (1994) and the Guatemalan Genocide (1978-1996) as well as more recent testimonies relating to the Anti-Rohingya Mass Violence (August-October 2017).

This 2 hour workshop run by the USC Shoah Foundation will provide hands-on training on how to use the Visual History Archive, introducing students, librarians, staff, and faculty to the archive’s history, collections, interface, and search engines that are the key to unlocking the research and teaching potential of the archive. Learn about watching interviews and get tips how successfully to navigate the many testimonies.

USC Shoah Foundation Logo

USC Shoah Foundation

Graduate Research Fair 2017 Thursday 2nd November

History Research Fair for Graduates

Thurs 2 Nov. 2-4pm, North School, Examination Schools

All new graduates are strongly advised to attend; current graduates are also invited.

All periods will be represented, including the archives from the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera and the Conservative Party Archive. The stalls cover British & European history, US history, Latin American history, African and Commonwealth history and East Asia, South Asia and Middle East history. The librarian from the Map Department can introduce you to the historical map collections held in the Bodleian Library but also explain how you can create your own maps. We will also have experts for Legal History, Official Papers, History of Science & Medicine as well as Visual Sources and Printed Ephemera. Talk to college librarians and archivists to discover their rich collections of rare books and archives which might be on your doorstep.

We have guest appearances from the History Research Librarian, the Information Skills Librarian, Senate House Library and the librarian from the Institute of Historical Research Library. Representatives of the Bibliography of British and Irish History and Gale Cengage will be present to give you advice about online repositories. If you are interested in Oxfordshire local history, then Oxfordshire History Centre stall will be an important stop. Brookes University Archivists will be visiting, and staff from the Dictionary of National Biography and Houses of Parliament Online. ORA (Oxford Research Archive) staff can advise you on depositing your thesis in Oxford’s online institutional repository. The Top 10 Tips stall will give you an opportunity to meet a current graduate who can share with you their advice.

A wide variety of subject areas which students can explore at their leisure throughout the afternoon!

Students at the History Research Fair

2nd years – more training available in TT!

Working towards your 2nd year thesis? There are still a few more training sessions left in Trinity Term to prepare you for researching over the Long Vacation…

Referencing: Choosing and Using software

Wednesday 24 May 14.00-17.00

Location: 13 Banbury Road, Isis Room

Formatting your in text citations, footnotes and bibliography correctly for your thesis or publication is a chore. Reference management software makes it easier and saves you time. This introductory session gives an overview of how reference management works, explores the pros and cons of a wide range of software packages and gives you the opportunity to try out five different packages (RefWorks, EndNote, Zotero, Mendeley and Papers) so that you can work out which one is best for you.

Objectives:

  • Understand how reference management software works and what it does
    • Understand the pros and cons of a range of reference management packages
    • Add, edit and organise references using a number of different tools
    • Add citations to documents and create bibliographies using a number of different tools
    • Make an informed decision about which reference management package works best for you

>Book a place 

Sources for Medievalists
Tuesday 30 May 14.00-16.15

Location: IT Services, 13 Banbury Road, Windrush Room

Presenters: Isabel Holowaty, Hilla Wait, Eva Oledska, Charlotte Goodall, Helen Scott

A general introduction to the vast range of electronic resources which are available for all historical periods for British and W European history: bibliographical databases, biographical / reference research aids, ebooks and ejournals, web portals, and collections of online primary source materials.

Subjects to be covered include:

• Bibliographical databases
• Bibliographical / reference research aids
• E-books and e-journals
• Web portals
• Collections of online primary source materials

> Book a place

Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th-20th centuries
Wednesday 7 June 09.30-12.30
Location: SSL, Information Skills Training Room
Presenters: Angela Carritt and Isabel Holowaty

Newspapers are a valuable resource for researching, not only news but also many other aspects of society. In this session we will introduce key historical and contemporary sources of news and how to make best use of them.

Subjects to be covered include:

  • The value of newspapers in research
  • The difficulties of using newspapers in research and effective search techniques
  • Using a range of sources for searching and reading historical newspapers
  • Using a range of sources for searching and using historical audio-visual news sources
  • Using a range of sources for searching and reading contemporary newspapers

    > Book a place

InfoSkills workshops in 3rd week for 2nd year Undergraduate Historians

Bodleian iSkills logoIn Week 3 of Trinity Term, the HFL and Bodleian Libraries will be running the following sessions, many of which are relevant for 2nd year UGs working towards their thesis. Please follow links to book online:

Research Skills for your Thesis [reserved for 2nd year UGs]
This 2-hour session is designed to equip students working on their dissertation with the key information skills in order to make best use of electronic information and discovery  resources. A range of databases, e-journals and web portals will be explored as well as advanced features in SOLO and tools for literature searches. Hands-on practise time will be offered.
Week 3: Wednesday 11th May, 2-4pm
Presenters: R D’Arcy-Brown, B Jenkins

> Book a Place (SSO required) [currently fully booked, but definitely worth signing up to the waiting list.]

1-1 with History Librarian
Thurs. 12 May, 11.30-12.30pm – Sign me up
If you would like a one-to-one session to get help any aspect of library resources and tools (SOLO, databases, ejournals, etc.) and generally get advice and tips for locating sources for British and Western European history, then sign up for a 1-1 session with Isabel Holowaty.

Bodleian iSkills: Online resources for Historians (Tuesday 10th May 09:30-10:45) – Book a place
A general introduction to the vast range of electronic resources which are available for all historical periods of British and W European history: bibliographical databases, biographical / reference research aids, ebooks and ejournals, web portals, and collections of online primary source materials.
Who is this session for? Students, researchers and anyone interested in this topic.
Presenter: Isabel Holowaty
Venue: Radcliffe Science Library, Parks Road

Bodleian iSkills: Sources for US History (Tuesday 10th May 11:00-12:30) – Book a place
Introduction to key information sources for the study of colonial America and US history. The session will provide an overview of the primary sources available in Oxford and online (such as early printed books, US newspapers and US government papers), as well as guidance on locating material for your research.
Who is this session for? Students, researchers and anyone interested in this topic.
Presenter: Jane Rawson
Venue: Radcliffe Science Library, Parks Road

Bodleian iSkills: Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th to 21st century (Wednesday 11th May 10:30-12:00) – Book a place
Newspapers are a valuable resource for researching not only news, but also many other aspects of society. In this session we will introduce key historical and contemporary sources of news and how to make best use of them.
Who is the session for? Students, researchers and anyone else who is interested.
Presenters: Isabel Holowaty, Angela Carritt
Venue: Radcliffe Science Library, Parks Road

Bodleian iSkills: Getting started in Oxford Libraries (Thursday 12th May 09:30-12:30; repeated 2nd June) (also repeated Week 6) – Book a place
An introduction to Oxford Libraries including guidance on which libraries to use; accessing e-journals and other online resources; SOLO and other finding aids and making the most of Library services.
Who is this session for? Anyone who would like an introduction to Oxford Libraries.
Presenters: Angela Carritt & Cathy Scutt.
Venue: Social Science Library, IT Room Ground Floor

Referencing: Zotero (Friday 13th May 9:15-12:15) – Book a place
Zotero is a reference management package that enables you to build libraries of references and add citations and bibliographies to word processed documents. This introduction covers the main features of Zotero.
Presenter: Erika Delbecque
Venue: IT Services, 13 Banbury Road

Keep up with Bodleian Libraries training opportunities: Why not follow them on Twitter or visit the Bodleian iSkills blog

Places still available for 2nd year Historians’ Research Skills Course

Places are still available for 2nd year Historians on the Research Skills for your Thesis course!

Are you preparing for researching your thesis over the summer months? Get a head start on the skills you need to make the best use of your time!

This 2-hour session is designed to equip students working on their dissertation with the key information skills in order to make best use of electronic information and discovery resources. A range of databases, e-journals and web portals will be explored as well as advanced features in SOLO and tools for literature searches. Hands-on practise time will be offered.
Week 1: Wednesday 27th April, 2-4pm
Week 3: Wednesday 11th May, 2-4pm [REPEAT]
Venue: RSL Training Room
Presenters: R D’Arcy-Brown, B Jenkins
> Book a Place (SSO required)

Primary Sources Online with Adam Matthew Digital – Monday 7th March

Eighteenth-Century Journals OnlineJoin us on Monday 7th March (8th week) at the Colin Matthews Room of the History Faculty on George Street for two sessions from Tom Derrick of primary source publisher Adam Matthew Digital exploring the wide range of resources available to Oxford University staff and students.

The first session (11.30-12.30) will look at resources relating to Early Modern studies, focusing particularly on three key collections: Empire Online, Eighteenth Century Journals, London Low Lifeand Defining Gender.

The afternoon session (13.20-14.20) will be on resources for Modern studies, particularly Mass Observation Online, First World War, and London Low Life.

Live demonstrations in both sessions will provide an overview of the content, key features and functionality, and show ways in which they can be integrated within instructional programs and research.

A buffet lunch will be provided; no booking is necessary though please contact isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk if you intend to also join for lunch.

Please bring your laptop for hands-on time.

Refworks for Historians course Monday 2nd week

Refworks headerNext week sees the return of one of our most popular courses! Refworks for Historians is a two-hour course held at the History Faculty, George St., from 2pm on Monday of 2nd week (26 Jan).  This course will introduce you to one of the most popular reference management software packages, which can help you turn a notepad full of scribbled references into neat footnotes and bibliographies, formatted into numerous styles at the click of a mouse. There will be a particular focus on using Refworks in conjunction with the History Faculty style guide.

This will be a useful course for anyone from 2nd year undergraduates beginning to think about their Theses, to DPhil and Masters’ students trying to get a handle on an ever-growing number of footnotes. Places are limited, but there are still spaces available via the History Faculty Library Weblearn site (SSO required).