Trial until 8 June: America and Great Britain : diplomatic relations, 1775-1815

Together with the Vere Harmsworth Library, we have organised a trial to America and Great Britain: diplomatic relations, 1775-1815. Oxford readers can access it via SOLO or OxLIP+.

America and Great Britain diplomatic relations - title pgThis resource is the digitised Cambridge Archive Edition 9-volume set of facsimile British diplomatic primary material, charting the emergence of an independent United States and comprising diplomatic correspondence between America and Britain.

It provides access to diplomatic and official correspondence between America and Britain and gives a good insight into the shaping of a nation, from America being referred to as ‘our Colonies and Plantations in North America’ by the King, to its recognition as the ‘United States’ by Britain in 1782.

The correspondence is formed of diplomatic letters between the British Government and American officials including Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, James Madison, John Jay and John Hancock. The collection begins with a résumé of events centered around American protests over taxation, follows the course of the War of Independence, and concludes, after ratification of the Treaty of Ghent in February 1815, with the restoration of normal diplomatic relations.Together these correspondences form a narrative which not only captures major historical events from a contemporary viewpoint, but also provides a vivid, lively and uniquely personal insight into the creators of modern America.

Transcript: "All that the americans want from Europeans is a supply of European manufactures... " America and Great Britain : diplomatic relations, 1775-1815. British government documents. Volume 3. 1783-1791 (Cambridge, 2016), p.344

Transcript: “All that the americans want from Europeans is a supply of European manufactures… ” America and Great Britain : diplomatic relations, 1775-1815. British government documents. Volume 3. 1783-1791 (Cambridge, 2016), p.344

 

The archive is a valuable tool in understanding an era of modernization in diplomatic practises. With the expansion of the British Foreign Office, there was a movement away from the era of the aristocratic amateur towards a more tightly controlled process, where professionalised servants of the British Crown filed regular despatches from across the world to a rigid procedure. The collection also provides an insight into European politics during this period. Conflicts between America, France and Britain arising over trade, defence and diplomacy are explored and increase our understanding of this complex trans-Atlantic triumvirate.

Feedback to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk or jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Related links:

Trial until 22nd April: Civil Rights in America

The VHL have organised trial access to Readex’s Civil Rights in America: from Reconstruction to the Great Society until 22nd April.

Civil Rights in America is a fully searchable archive of congressional documents related to all aspects of civil rights in the United States, from segregation to women’s suffrage to discrimination of all kinds. The material in this collection includes publications and reports from the US Senate and House of Representatives, the executive branch, congressional committees, special investigations and non-governmental organizations. Please note, there will be significant overlap with our existing congressional resources such as the Serial Set.

Access is available via OxLIP+ until 22nd April 2016 (use single sign-on for remote access). Please send feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

[re-blogged from the VHL blog post.]

New: Migration to New Worlds

I am pleased to report that Oxford historians now have access to Adam Matthew’s Migration to New Worlds. Following a collaboration between Jisc and Adam Matthew this resource is made freely available to all UK academics and students in higher (HE) and further (FE) education institutions from January 2016.

Migration to New Worlds documents the emigration of peoples to the United States, Canada and Australasia during the period 1800 to 1924, although there are documents from the eighteenth century and also later materials.

Mainly focusing on European emigration, the resource includes material on English, Scandinavian, Irish, Italian, Jewish, Polish and Scottish experiences along with a wealth of material covering Chinese and Japanese movement to the United States.

The majority of the collection comprises unique manuscript correspondence, diaries and travel journals, providing eye-witness accounts and experiences of emigrants across the World. It is also rich in visual content.

Topics covered include: motives for emigration; assisted migration schemes; social conditions and organisation in ports of emigration; ships and shipping lines involved in emigration; government legislation for emigration and immigration; settlement, naturalisation and choice of location; maintaining identities.

This collection of primary sources provides an important and multi-faceted resource for students, teachers and researchers from a diverse range of academic disciplines, including migration studies, history, sociology, law, economics and postcolonial studies.

Migration to New Worlds is now available via SOLO and Databases A-Z.

Watch a webinar on this resource:

Related resources on the web:

Trial until 19th February: African American Newspapers 1827-1998

The Vere Harmsworth Library has organised a trial to Readex’s African American Newspapers series I and II. The trial ends 19th February.

This resource covers 1827-1998, and provides online access to approximately 330 U.S. newspapers chronicling a century and a half of the African American experience. The collections include historically significant papers from more than 35 states, and many rare 19th-century titles.

We trialled series I in July 2013. Series II, which has just been released, adds a further 75 titles to the first collection.

Access is available via OxLIP+ until 19th February 2016 (University members can use single sign-on for remote access).

Please send feedback about the trial to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Also useful:

Check out the rest of the History eResources Desiderata and Trials.

Trial until 5 February: Black Authors 1556-1922

The Vere Harmsworth Library has organised trial access to Readex’s Black Authors: Imprints from the Library Company of Philadelphia (1556-1922).

This collection offers more than 550 fully catalogued and searchable works by black authors from the Americas, Europe and Africa, expertly compiled by the curators of Afro-Americana Imprints collection, the largest existing collection of its kind. Found within are wide-ranging genres, including personal narratives, autobiographies, histories, expedition reports, military reports, novels, essays, poems and musical compositions.

Major subject areas addressed in Black Authors include Literature, Ethnic History, Colonialism, Gender Studies, Slavery, Diaspora Studies and related fields. As a whole, this collection reveals how the creative efforts of black authors evolved over three centuries. The earliest published works of authors of African descent are largely travel narratives and historical works treating the exploration of the African continent and the collision between European powers with the peoples of Africa.

Access is available via OxLIP+ until 5th February 2016 (use single sign-on for remote access). Please send comments or feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

[re-blogged from the VHL blog.]

Digital National Security Archive: now via ProQuest

[partially re-blogged from the VHL blog post by Jane Rawson.]

Our subscription to the Digital National Security Archive has moved from its own site to be incorporated into the ProQuest platform. If you’re used to using our other ProQuest resources (Historic Newspapers, American Periodicals, Ethnic NewsWatch, Dissertations & Theses among others), the new search interface will be familiar to you, and as with our other ProQuest subscriptions, it will now be possible to cross-search these with the DNSA.

What is the DNSA?

The Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) provides access to over 500,000 pages of declassified documents, starting in 1945 and going right up to almost the present day for certain topics.  The main way in which this resource differs from Declassified Document Reference System (DDRS) is that it is organised thematically, with documents arranged into collections on specific areas or events such as Afghanistan, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, or US military uses of space.  New collections are added relatively frequently, so even if your area of interest is not currently covered it is worth checking back periodically.  More from a VHL Blog post.

Using DNSA Collections on ProQuest

DNSA is arranged as a number of thematic collections, which could be searched individually. There are three ways to do this now it has moved to ProQuest:

  1. From the basic search screen, the collections are listed at the bottom of the page (click ‘show all’ to see the full list). Clicking on any of these collections will take you to a search screen for just that collection.
  2. From the advanced search screen, you can select some or all DNSA collections in the ‘search options’ underneath the search boxes.
  3. Using the ‘select databases‘ option in the blue bar at the top of the screen. Click where it says ‘searching 1 database’ to expand the list, and then you can select whichever ProQuest databases you choose. If you scroll down to select Digital National Security Archive you will see a + sign; clicking on that will expand a further list of the individual DNSA collections for you to select or deselect. This is also how you can cross-search DNSA with other ProQuest databases subscribed to by Oxford.

Check out more guidance on the new platform on

  • Using DNSA Bibliographies, Chronologies and Glossaries on ProQuest
  • Exporting saved searches and references from My Archive – important!

Related resource:

Declassified Documents: DDRS and DNSA

RAI Travel Awards for primary source research in the US

[re-blogged from the VHL blog post by Jane Rawson.]

If you’re an Oxford student writing your thesis on an American topic in History or Politics, and are thinking about travelling to conduct primary source research in the United States, you might like to consider applying for a travel award from the Rothermere American Institute.

Full details of the awards and how to apply may be found on the RAI website. The deadline for submission of applications is 12 noon on Friday 12th June.

New: e-access to The Nation, National Review, The New Republic Digital Archives

[re-blogged from the VHL Blog.]

We’re pleased to announce that, following a trial in the autumn, we have now subscribed to the digital archives of three significant political magazines: The Nation, National Review and The New Republic.

  • The Nation is the oldest continually published weekly magazine in the United States, beginning publication in 1865, and describes itself as “the flagship of the left”.
  • National Review was founded in 1955 by William F. Buckley, Jr. and is a hugely important source for any study of American conservatism over the past sixty years.
  • The New Republic, founded in 1914, is widely considered important in changing the character of liberalism in the direction of governmental interventionism, both foreign and domestic.

Each archive starts from the first issue and runs up to present, and the three may be cross-searched with each other and also the Readers’ Guide Retrospective database. Access is via Databases A-Z.

Related resource

Readers’ Guide Retrospective: 1890-1982

More eresource trials: The Nation, National Review, New Republic archives

[re-blogged from the VHL blog post.]

As well as the History Vault trial which we announced, we now have trial access to three magazine archives: The Nation, National Review and The New Republic.

  • The Nation is the oldest continually published weekly magazine in the United States, beginning publication in 1865, and describes itself as “the flagship of the left”.
  • National Review was founded in 1955 by William F. Buckley, Jr. and is a hugely important source for any study of American conservatism over the past sixty years.
  • The New Republic, founded in 1914, is widely considered important in changing the character of liberalism in the direction of governmental interventionism, both foreign and domestic.

The VHL has extensive holdings in print of all three magazines, although we have significant gaps in our run of National Review.

Access is available via OxLIP+ until 24th November 2014. Please send comments and feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Trial until 31st October: History Vault

[re-blogged from the VHL blog post.]

We now have trial access to ProQuest History Vault until 31st October.

History Vault contains a number of collections of papers and documents covering a range of American history topics, particularly African American, political and military history. Collections are largely focused on the 20th century but earlier material is also included.

The full list of collections is as follows (links take you to the descriptive brochures with further information and details of what’s included):

Access is now available via OxLIP+ until 31st October 2014. Please send any comments or feedback to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.