New: The Grand Tour

I am pleased to report that Oxford researchers now have access to The Grand Tour (Adam Matthew Digital). Use your SSO for remote access.

As thousands of British tourists are currently enjoying their holidays in Europe, no doubt Facebooking and Instagramming their experiences and sights, it is worth reflecting back how travel accounts used to be written and at a time when European travel was reserved to the aristocratic and wealthy young men of the eighteenth century and seen as part of their education.

The Grand Tour, a term first used by J. Gailhard, The compleat gentleman, or, Directions for the education of youth as to their breeding at home and travelling abroad (1678)*, was a phenomenon which shaped the creative and intellectual sensibilities of some of the eighteenth century’s greatest artists, writers and thinkers. Now researchers have access to digitised accounts of the English abroad in Europe c1550-1850.

The source materials in The Grand Tour highlight the influence of continental travel on British art, architecture, urban planning, literature and philosophy. They are also useful for the study of daily life in the eighteenth century, whether it be on transportation, communications, money, social norms, health, sex or food and drink. Furthermore, the material covers European political and religious life, British diplomacy; life at court, and social customs on the Continent, and is an excellent resource for the study of Europe’s urban spaces. This resource will be useful for those studying history, history of art and architecture, British and European literature.

There is a wealth of detail about cities such as Paris, Rome, Florence and Geneva, including written accounts and visual representations of street life, architecture and urban planning.

What is included?

The Grand Tour provides full-text access to a curated collection of manuscripts, printed works and visual resources. The materials draw on collections held in a number of libraries and archives, including many in private or neglected collections. Assembling these in a single resource will allow researchers for the first time to better compare the sources.

In particular the scanned and indexed materials include letters; diaries and journals; account books; printed guidebooks; published travel writing; but also visual resources such as paintings and sketches; architectural drawings and maps. Palaeographical skills are needed to decipher manuscript letters. Some images of scanned manuscripts are challenging to read.

Using an interactive map, researchers can also locate any sources related to a town or city:

Also included is an online version of John Ingamells (comp.), Dictionary and Archive of Travellers in Italy 1701-1800 (New Haven, 1997). This well-known publication lists over 6,000 individual Grand Tourists, provides biographical details and details of their tours.

For those needing an introductory and historiographical account of Grand Tour research, there are essays by Professors Jeremy Black, Edward Chaney and Rosemary Sweet.

Other supplementary aids include a chronology of 18th century European events, a political chronology of Italy, and a list of Italian rulers, as well as a selected bibliography for further reading.

The Grand Tour is accessible to Oxford researchers and Bodleian-registered readers via SOLO or OxLIP+.

Also useful

ANSELL, Richard, Foubert’s academy : British and Irish elite formation in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Paris and London, in Beyond the Grand Tour : Northern metropolises and early modern travel behaviour; edited by Rosemary Sweet, Gerrit Verhoeven and Sarah Goldsmith. (London: Routledge, 2017)

GOLDSMITH, Sarah, Dogs, Servants and Masculinities : Writing about Danger on the Grand Tour, in Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 40:1 (2017) 3-21, DOI: 10.1111/1754-0208.12342.

*Oxford English Dictionary, http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/80717, accessed 17 August 2017

Trial until 24 April: Leisure, Travel and Mass Culture – the History of Tourism

Oxford researchers are now invited to trial Leisure, Travel and Mass Culture – the History of Tourism. This resource provides access to a highly diverse collection of material on well-known, little-known and far-flung travel destinations across the world between 1850s and 1980s.

It can be accessed via SOLO or OxLIP+. Please note that PDF downloads are not available during this trial.

From Adam Matthew Digital, http://www.amdigital.co.uk/m-products/product/leisure-travel-and-mass-culture-the-history-of-tourism/detailed-information/, accessed 27 March 2017

Collections come from multiple archives, including Thomas Cook, provide a multi-national perspective on the evolution of affordable tourism between 1850 and the 1980s. It offers researchers an interesting insight into social and cultural history, such as the growth and expansion of travel agents and transport companies and the integral role they played in the accessibility of destinations across Britain, Europe, North America and around the World.

Key subject themes include:

  • Beachfront
  • Historical, Cultural or Religious Tourism
  • Road, Rail and Automobile Travel
  • Children and Families
  • Women and Tourism
  • The Great Outdoors
  • Planning and Business
  • International Relations
  • Package Tours
  • Cruises and Organised Travel
  • Accommodation, Hospitality and Entertainment
  • Health and Medical Travel
  • Urban Tours and City Breaks

The resource features a wide range of different document types, including:

From http://www.amdigital.co.uk/m-products/product/leisure-travel-and-mass-culture-the-history-of-tourism/detailed-information/, accessed 27 March 2017

  • Travel diaries and journals
  • Scrapbooks
  • Photographs
  • Guidebooks
  • Film
  • Posters
  • Postcards
  • Leaflets and brochures
  • Correspondence
  • Periodicals
  • Maps
  • Government documents
  • Printed books
  • Ephemera
  • Prints, engravings, illustration and sketches

 

 

 

The coverage of countries is global, with documents covering the Arctic, Asia, Africa and Americas, Caribbean, Middle East and of course Europe.

Send feedback to isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk by 24 April.

New: Country Life Archive (1897-2005) & Country Life Picture Library

country-life-cover-29-may-1969

Front page. (1969, May 29). Country Life (Archive : 1901 – 2005), ProQuest, accessed 21 Sept. 2016

I am pleased to report that Oxford historians now have access to Country Life Archive, covering 1897 to 2005.

Country Life is a well-known weekly British culture and lifestyle magazine, founded in 1897 by Edward Hudson, friend of Gertrude Jekyll and patron of Edwin Lutyens.

It focuses on fine art and architecture, the great country houses and their interiors, church and historic buildings, landscapes, rural living and leisure pursuits such as antique collecting, farming, hunting, shooting, horse riding and gardening.

country-life-photo-of-mrs-cooper-key-18-jan-1941

Country Life (1941, Jan 18). Country Life (Archive : 1901 – 2005), ProQuest.

The magazine also reported on national events, governmental policy relating to agricultural affairs as well as society affairs of rural gentry.

Country Life is rich in advertising of, for instance, properties and as such is a valuable source in retracing the history of houses as well as finding images of them. Other advertising includes services and equipment needed for country living.

A highly visual resource, every page is full-text searchable, and reproduced in high-resolution and full colour.

The advanced search functionality includes the ability to search for specific images such as photos of interiors and exteriors or architectural drawings / plans.

country-life-advert-18-jan-1941

K L G. (1941, Jan 18). Country Life (Archive : 1901 – 2005), ProQuest, accessed 21 Sept. 2016

Country Life Picture Library contains images of country houses and gardens, interiors and architectural details, historic buildings and churches from the photo-archive of Country Life magazine. All images reference the original Country Life articles for which they were commissioned. Please note that images themselves can only be used upon registration, ordering and payment.

Both the Country Life Archive and Country Life Picture Library are now available on OxLIP+ to our readers. It will be added to SOLO shortly.

New: Women, War and Society, 1914–1918 (Archives Unbound)

Following a successful trial last year and thanks to the very generous donation by John and Jean Dunbabin, Oxford historians now have access to Women, War and Society, 1914–1918 (Archives Unbound).

This resource fully documents the essential contribution of women during the Great War as well as the revolutionary and permanent impact the War had on the personal, social and professional lives of these women. It is an important collection for research into 20th century social, political, military and gender history.

Women, War and Society, 1914–1918 - screenshotThe resource reproduces primary source material (115,225 images) brought together in the Imperial War Museum, London, and originally published by the Air Ministry, League of Mercy and War Fund, Purple Cross Service, Russian Relief Fund and many other organizations. This definitive digital collection of charity and international relief reports, pamphlets, photographs, press cuttings and more is fully searchable.

Poster: The Babies' Candidate. Mrs. How Martyn's Election Address. Suffrage And Politics. N.d. The Women at Work Collection, Imperial War Museum, London. The Imperial War Museum, London, United Kingdom. Archives Unbound. Web. 15 July 2016

Poster: The Babies’ Candidate. Mrs. How Martyn’s Election Address. Suffrage And Politics. N.d. The Women at Work Collection, Imperial War Museum, London. The Imperial War Museum, London, United Kingdom. Archives Unbound. Web. 15 July 2016

On behalf of the library and the Committee of the Library Provision and Strategy (CLiPS) in History, I would like to extend my deepest thanks to JOHN and JEAN DUNBABIN for donating sufficient funds to permanently add this resource to the library’s holding and ensure that future generation of historians have access to important source material on this period and topic.

Other useful resources:

Remembering V.E. Day – Reginald McCarthy’s donation of Nazi books to the Bodleian Library

Today, on 8 May, seems an appropriate moment to mark the 71st Victory in Europe Day, or V.E. Day, by publicly acknowledging, thanking and remembering a kind bibliophile for donating some Nazi publications to the Bodleian Library. Such material should continue to be made accessible and preserved, ideally in a library, as a reminder to subsequent generations of the horrors of the Third Reich and the Second World War. Photos of Hitler posing with children make for very uncomfortable and unnerving viewing as do shots of the German navy, however excellent the German photographic skills and equipment are.

As so often, libraries are the vehicles through which members of the public, scholars and students can benefit from the generosity of other members of the public. My warmest thanks must therefore go to Mr Andrew McCarthy for his kindness in donating the following books, which once belonged to his father Mr Reginald McCarthy, to the Bodleian Library:Deutscher Fuhrer Deutsches Schicksal - cover

Hans Heinz Mantau-Sadila (Hrsg.), Deutsche Führer, Deutsches Schicksal : das Buch der Künder und Führer des Dritten Reiches. (München : Steinebach, 1934)

Hans Weberstedt, Kurt Langner, Adolf Hitler & Kurt Langner, Gedenkhalle für die Gefallenen des Dritten Reiches. (München : Zentralverlag der NSDAP, Franz Eher Nachf., 1935)Hitler with boy

Heinrich Hoffmann (Hrsg.), Jugend um Hitler : 120 Bilddokumente aus der Umgebung des Führers. 1.-30 Tsd. (Berlin : Zeitgeschichte-Verl., Nationalsozialismus, 1935)

Fritz-Otto Busch, Die deutsche Kriegsmarine im Kampf: Schiffe und Taten. 1. – 20 Tsd.(Berlin : Vier Tannen Verlag, 1943)Feind Im Fadenkreuz 8

Norbert von Baumbach, Ruhmestage der Deutschen Marine: Bilddokumente des Seekrieges.  (Hamburg : Broschek, 1933)

Werner Hartmann, Feind in Fadenkreuz: U-Boot auf Jagd im Atlantik. Mit einem Vorwort vom Befehlshaber der U-Boote, Vizeadmiral Karl Dönitz. (Berlin : Verlag Die Heimbücherei,  1942)

Josef Pöchlinger, Das Buch vom Westwall. 2. Aufl. (Berlin : O. Elsner, 1940)Deutscher Jugendklang 3

Heinrich Pfannschmidt, Arthur Schmidt & Otto Roy, Deutscher Jugendklang. T. 1. Liederbuch f. VI-OI. Mit e. kurzen Elementarlehre d. Musik. 3. durchges. Aufl. (Berlin Trowitzsch, 1938)

Edwin Erich Dwinger, Zwischen Weiss und Rot : die russische Tragödie 1919-1920  (Jena : Diederichs, 1930)

Apart from the historiographical interest, those interested in the history of photography will likewise find some of the visual content noteworthy.

Below, Mr Andrew McCarthy reflects on his father’s life, his interest in German culture, his loathing of Hitler and keen book-collecting but also book-donating habits to school libraries and German prisoners of war. He sounds a fascinating and multi-faceted man.

Isabel Holowaty, History Librarian

REFLECTIONS ON MY FATHER

by Andrew McCarthy

Reginald McCarthy. © Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

Reginald McCarthy. © Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

I cannot remember a time when I was not surrounded by books.  My father, Reginald McCarthy, bought and read books all his life.  He taught me to read when I was four, and as soon as I could read, he bought books for me.  He was born in 1896 and died in 1982.  He served in the East Yorkshire Regiment during the Great War, and was wounded at Passchendaele.  He spent most of his working life as an architect, surveyor, and estate agent. In the 1930s he owned and edited a local weekly newspaper, the “Hornsea and District Bulletin”, in the East Riding of Yorkshire.  No copies are known to survive.

My father spoke fluent German, which he had taught himself in an era when German books were printed in Gothic type.  He would walk around the house declaiming Heine’s “Die Lorelei”, which he knew by heart.

He loathed the Nazis, Hitler, and all that he stood for, but he would buy almost anything in German if it looked interesting. I grew up seeing the books which I have given to the Bodleian Library sitting next to “Andersen’s Märchen und Geschichten”, German editions of Shakespeare,  “Im Westen Nichts Neues”, “Die Kreuzerfahrten der Goeben und Breslau”, and my boyhood favourite, “Auto, Schiff und Flugzeug.”

He was an obsessive collector, who believed that money spent on bookshelves could be better spent on books.  There were piles of books all over our house.  If my father needed a book which was at the bottom of a pile, he would pull it out carefully.  The pile would wobble, but stay upright, only to fall over days later, often in the middle of dinner.  In 1977, there were over 3,500 books in our house.

My father loved collecting, but he also enjoyed giving books away to school libraries, or anyone else who might appreciate them.  I don’t think he ever imagined that some of his books would end up in the Bodleian.  He gave books to the libraries of the schools I attended.  I have 28 letters (I’ve just counted them!) from Sister Augustine, the Headmistress of St. Joseph’s Preparatory School in Nottingham, thanking him for books.  She said:

“I think soon the Library will have to be known as the McCarthy library…  Mr Crawley has already absorbed the books into the library, and, as I have said before, thanks to you it is building up into something truly worthwhile.” 

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

I also have some letters which were sent to him in 1946 and 1947 from the Commandant of the Prisoner of War Camp in Wollaton Park, in Nottingham, thanking him for several donations of books.

The Second World War had only just ended, but my father felt sorry for the German prisoners, so he gave them books in German.  He loathed the Nazis, but he’d fought against German soldiers on the Somme in 1916 and at Passchendaele in 1917, and was able to see “Jerry”, as he always called the German soldier, as a human being.

It’s interesting to learn how the system at the Prisoner of War Camp worked.  My father was asked if he would send the Commandant the full details of any books he wanted to give to the camp library, so that they could be approved (or not) by “the appropriate department in London”.  “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” was welcomed with enthusiasm, but “ANILIN” was on the banned list.

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

© Reproduced by kind permission of Andrew McCarthy.

My father’s record-keeping was chaotic – just like his shelving of books – but I am fairly sure that he bought the Nazi books from Foyle’s on the Charing Cross Road in the 1930s.  He told me that the staff kept them on one side for him.  When a young British Nazi, or Fascist, had repeatedly asked if they had any books about Hitler and the Nazis.  Foyles’ staff pretended that they didn’t.  They were keeping the books for my father, because they knew he hated Hitler.  My father was a loyal reader of the “Daily Telegraph”, which, along with the “Manchester Guardian”, reported the activities of the Nazis in the 1930s fairly accurately.  The editor of the “Times”, Geoffrey Dawson, was an appeaser, and would suppress or modify news stories which might anger Hitler.

From 1922 until 1932 my father lived in Hornsea, in the East Riding of Yorkshire.  He was an architect, surveyor, and estate agent.  He owned and edited the local weekly newspaper, the “Hornsea and District Bulletin.”  As if he didn’t have enough to do, he also ran a private library.  This was in his office in Newbegin, Hornsea.  Books could be borrowed for a small annual subscription.  This was the heyday of the private library, when Boots and and W.H. Smith’s branches would lend books for a small fee.

From "Beverley Guardian", 8 February 1930

From “Beverley Guardian”,
8 February 1930

 

From 1927 until 1931-1932, my father was a member of the Hornsea Urban District Council.  He said that there were: “Three Colonels, a major, a plumber, a cobbler and a postman M.P.  Politics were banned, they sat round the table classless, for the good of their town.”

In 1930, the council proposed establishing a public lending library.  At first, my father objected, because Hornsea ratepayers would have to bear some of the cost, as this cutting from the “Beverley Guardian”, of February 8th 1930, explains.  When the East Riding County Council offered a library of one thousand books, paid for by the County, my father withdrew his objection.  The library, in the Town Hall, opened on March 14th, 1930.  It opened 101 times in its first year, and 29,542 books were issued.  Some residents were not as conscientious as they should have been.  In June, 1931, the Waterworks, Fire Brigade, Museum and Library Committee decided to write “strong letters to persons who had failed to return books within the allotted time”.

My father’s obsession with books lasted all his life.  He would have been astonished and delighted to learn that some of his books have ended up in the Bodleian.

 

Andrew McCarthy is the author of “The Huns Have Got My Gramophone: Advertisements from the Great War”, Bodleian Library Publishing, 2014. http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/bodley/news/2014/jun-24

Bodleian Libraries paintings on BBC Your Paintings website

Your Paintings is a website created by the BBC and the Public Catalogue Forum, which aims to show the entire UK national collection of oil paintings, the stories behind the paintings, and where to see them for real. It is made up of paintings from thousands of museums and other public institutions around the country.  There are around 212,000 records for paintings from over 3000 locations on the site.  Most records have a digital image of the painting, along with details of where the original painting is located.

your paintings

The site can be browsed by painting title, artist or the geographical location of the collection or gallery, and also searched by keyword.  This free resource will be of interest to historians from a variety of fields, as well as history of art scholars.  Keyword searches reveal paintings of World War One trenches, many medical-related images and key figures in history from across the globe.

your paintings Bod Page

(c) BBC Your Paintings

Painting from the Bodleian Libraries and other places in Oxford

The Bodleian Libraries section of the site contains over 330 oil paintings.  These are mainly portraits of people linked  to the Bodleian Libraries, royalty and images of the decorated ceilings in the Bodleian Library.

There are also collections from other parts of the University (e.g. Pitt Rivers Museum), colleges and halls (including Oriel, Brasenose, St Stephen’s) and Oxford Brookes University.  Many other places in Oxfordshire have also contributed images including municipal buildings, schools and museums.

Related Links Bodleian Libraries homepage | Oxford History of Art Department | Art and Architecture LibGuide

ARTstor news: Additional images of European architecture and sculpture images by Sarah N. James

These ARTstor additions should be of interest to historians of medieval and early modern English and European history:

“ARTstor is collaborating with Sarah N. James to add more than 450 images of Italian architecture and painting and more than 400 images of English art and architecture to the Digital Library. The new images will join James’s collection of more than 600 images of Italian and English architecture. The collection currently centers on England, including cathedrals and parish churches from the Norman Romanesque period; ecclesiastical buildings in the early English, decorated, and perpendicular styles; medieval secular architecture including castles, marketplaces, and town halls; perpendicular gothic collegiate buildings; and Tudor, Elizabethan, baroque, and neoclassical country houses and churches. Photographed in situ during James’ travels throughout Europe, the images provide contextual views of sculpture and architecture from various angles.

View the collection in the ARTstor’s Digital Library:

For more detailed information about this collection, visit European Architecture and Sculpture (Sara N. James) collection page.”

[ARTstor 11 April 2011]