Reclassification of part of the collection

Reclassification Update This summer library staff are completing Phase Three of the Moys Reclassification Project.  Staff will be reorganising books currently held in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States.  This is part of the long-term Moys re-classification project that has been underway since 2006.  All the books will be fully accessible to our… Read More »

Three days is a long time in politics

On Wednesday Theresa May notified the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, of the UK’s intention to leave the European Union. The six-page letter triggering the Article 50 process is here. And the response?  Donald Tusk was clear: ‘There is no reason to pretend that this is a happy day, neither in Brussels, nor… Read More »

International Women’s Day

“On International Women’s Day, let us all pledge to do everything we can to overcome entrenched prejudice, support engagement and activism, and promote gender equality and women’s empowerment.” UN Secretary-General, António Guterres This year, the UN’s chosen theme is  “Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030” and women’s economic empowerment in… Read More »

LGBT History Month

For an academic law library – below is what passes as a veritable rainbow of colourful book covers in celebration!  There is a specific LawBod Libguide on LGBT law resources at Oxford. The focus is on the development & experience in the UK – but both the Libguide and the LawBod’s collections do have works… Read More »

Is this the real life?

“Mama … just killed a man”* Not the happiest start to a Christmas blog post but nevertheless it is the striking line (after the preamble of course) to the only song to have been number 1 at Christmas twice and given that this is the last post in the series, it seems fitting to end… Read More »

It’s only make believe

This somewhat melancholy and mournful tune by Conway Twitty, was the 1958 Christmas number one.  Conway Twitty, (having changed his name and chosen two seemingly random towns as names), was an American singer and this was his first big hit.  The song was actually written whilst Conway was in Ontario, apparently he had become convinced that this is… Read More »

The Wall

Pink Floyd’s lyrics for The Wall, expressing a less than positive view of education, clearly resonated with the record buying public at the end of 1979. Teenagers may have finished the year singing ‘We don’t need no education*’, but at the beginning of the year other pop stars were rather more supportive; on the 9th… Read More »