Category Archives: ORA

Researching in Arts and Humanities? Discover key tools at the Humanities Research Skills Toolkit

Are you making the most of the IT and Library research tools available to help you with your thesis or dissertation?   Do you need to brush up on your IT and information skills?  IT Services and Bodleian Libraries will be working together to run our award winning Research Skills Toolkit during week 8 (this term) and week 1 of Hilary Term.

We will be running two dedicated sessions for Arts and Humanities on Wed 3 Dec 10-12 and Mon 19 Jan 14.00-16.00. In addition we will be running individual sessions for Oriental Studies (Thurs 4 Dec 10.00-12.00), History, Archaeology and Classics (Wed 21 Jan 14.00-16.00)  and English Literature (Thursday 22 Jan 10.00-12.00)

If you’re not familiar with the Research Skills Toolkit, these are 2 hour workshops at which you have a chance to try out 10 different tools and skills which will help you in your research. The Arts and Humanties Toolkits will include the following:

  • Using key Humanities databases to find articles, books and other materials in your research field.  Participants will be able to choose from MLA (English and Modern Languages), Oxford Bibliographies Online,  Philosopher’s Index, ATLA Religion, Historical Abstracts, Art Full Text, Old and New Testament Abstracts, America History and Life and RILM Music Literature Abstracts)
  • Finding primary materials using PastMasters
  • Keeping up to date with new research publications using RSS feeds and email alerts
  • Finding high impact articles and books and tracking citations to key authors and works using Arts & Humanities Citation Index
  • Your thesis and ORA – essential information about copyright and sensitive data
  • Plagiarism and how to avoid it
  • Endnote for managing citations, inserting intext references/footnotes and creating bibliographies
  • Free software for image manipulation
  • Managing your thesis with Word

These workshops are very popular so please be sure to book your place online.

Not studying a Humanities subject?  We will be running toolkits for most subject areas. Check LibGuides workshops for a full list.

Key research tools for Social Sciences

Are you making the most of the research tools available to help you with your thesis or dissertation?   Do you need to brush up on your IT and information skills? IT Services and Bodleian Libraries will be working together to run our award winning Research Skills Toolkit during week 8 and will be running 3 sessions for Social Sciences (Tues 2 Dec 14.00-16.00, Thurs 4 Dec 14.00-16.00 and  Fri 5 Dec 10.00-12.00) .   If you’re not familiar with the Research Skills Toolkit, these are 2 hour workshops at which you have a chance to try out 10 different tools and skills which will help you in your research. The Social Sciences Toolkits will include the following:

  • Keeping up to date with new research publications using RSS feeds and email alerts
  • Searching for disserations and theses using Proquest
  • Citation searching with Web of Science to find high impact articles and journals and to track citations between papers
  • Your thesis and ORA – essential information about copyright and sensitive data
  • Plagiarism and how to avoid it
  • Endnote for managing citations, inserting intext references/footnotes and creating bibliographies
  • Free software for image manipulation
  • Managing your thesis with Word
  • Analysing data with Excel Pivot tables

These workshops are very popular so please be sure to book your place online.

Not a Social Scientist?  We will be running toolkits for most subject areas. Check LibGuides workshops for a full list.

 

Calling Oxford DPhils – Your thesis, copyright and ORA

If you are an Oxford DPhil, you are probaly aware that you are required to deposit a digital copy of your thesis in the Oxford Research Archive (ORA).    Once deposited, your thesis will, after a short embargo period become publically available via ORA.

Since your thesis will eventually be publically available on ORA, it is essential that you get permission to reproduce any materials (e.g. pictures etc) where a third party holds the copyright.  This may even apply to materials that you have authored yourself (e.g. journal articles) if the copyright belongs to a third party such as a publisher.  Our top tip is to be aware of copyright issues as early as possible in your research as getting permissions as you go along is usually much easier than leaving it until you have finished your thesis.

In addition, if your thesis includes sensitive or confidential material you may need to apply for a dispensation from consultation for the whole or part of your thesis.

To find out more about how to handle copyright and sensitive data in your digital thesis, come along to  Bodleian iSkills: Your thesis, copyright and ORA  on Thursday 23 Oct 10.00 – 11.00 in Seminar Room C, Manor Road Building.   Please note that although this session is free, booking is essential

Protecting your work – what you need to know about copyright

Intellectual property and copyright are key concerns for today’s researchers. This WISER session next week will be raising your awareness of issues to look out for, both in using other people’s work and in publishing your own work.

Key topics will include:

  • What is copyright and how does it affect you as a researcher?
  • Using other people’s work for your own publications and research, and for teaching from a range of formats
  • Publishing your own work – including protecting your copyright, what to look out for in your contract with your publisher, open access publishing and re-use licences

Click here to book for WISER: Protecting your work – what you need to know about copyright, Tue 17 Jun 11.00 – 12.30

Monographs and Open Access – join the HEFCE debate

An opportunity for Oxford academics and researchers to debate the issues around scholarly monographs and open access with publishers and funders, and feed into HEFCE’s Expert Reference Group project.

Programme of speakers:

  • Introduction: Catriona Cannon (Interim Deputy Librarian, Bodleian Libraries)
  • Cecy Marden (Wellcome Trust, HEFCE Expert Reference Group)
  • Frances Pinter (Knowledge Unlatched, HEFCE Expert Reference Group)
  • Rhodri Jackson (OUP and OAPEN-UK JISC-funded project on open access monographs)
  • Geoffrey Crossick (HEFCE Expert Reference Group, Chair)
  • QandA. Panel joined by Sally Rumsey (Oxford Research Archive)

We welcome all Oxford academics and researchers to this debate, especially those from the Humanities and Social Sciences.

>Book your place to join the debate on Wed 18 Jun 2.00 – 5.30

D.Phils – last chance to book “WISER: Your thesis, copyright and ORA”

There are three more places on “WISER: Your thesis, copyright and ORA” this term.      This session introduces key information for students preparing D.Phil theses – in particular focussing on what you need to know about copyright and sensitive data before submitting your thesis to the Oxford Research Archive – which is mandatory for Oxford D.Phil students.   Students are encouraged to attend this session early in their research to avoid a scramble for copyright permissions when you come to submit.

This term’s sessions take place on Wednesday 24 October 15.45 – 16.45  and Monday 29 Oct 12.30 – 13.30.  Please book your place online.

Essential information for DPhils – copyright, sensitive information and ORA

Doing a DPhil?   Oxford DPhil students are required to deposit a copy of their thesis electronically in the Oxford Research Archive (ORA).   Its worth thinking about this now, even if you will not be submitting for several years.  In particular, the requirement to deposit in ORA means that you will need to get copyright permission for any material in your thesis which belongs to third parties (e.g. pictures,  full text journal articles and more).  Getting copyright permissions as you go along is preferable to leaving it until the end of your thesis.     In addition, if you plan to include sensitive information you will need to get a dispensation from consultation.

Find out what you need to know at our workshop  WISER: Your thesis, copyright and ORA.  This session is running  Wednesday 24 October 15.45-16.45 and Monday 29 October 12.30-13.30. Please book your place online.

DPhils – Copyright, your thesis and ORA

Oxford DPhils students are required to deposit a copy of their thesis electronically in the Oxford Research Archive (ORA).   Once deposited, your thesis will be publically available via ORA (in many cases after an embargo period).

Since your thesis will eventually be available on ORA, it is essential that you get permission to reproduce any materials (e.g. pictures, journal articles etc) where a third party holds the copyright.  This may even apply to materials that you have authored yourself (e.g. journal articles)  if the copyright belongs to a third party.  Our top tip is to be aware of copyright issues as early as possible in your research as getting permissions as you go along is usually much easier than leaving it until you have finished your thesis.

In addition, if your thesis includes sensitive or confidential material you may need to apply for a dispensation from consultation for the whole or part of your thesis.

To find out more about how to handle copyright and sensitive data in your electronic thesis, come along to  WISER: Your thesis, copyright and ORA  on Wednesday 9 May 12.30-1.30   > book your place.

Calling all DPhils – your thesis, copyright and ORA

Oxford DPhils students are required to deposit a copy of their thesis electronically in the Oxford Research Archive (ORA).    Ensuring that you have copyright permission to include any information or material in your thesis which is owned by third parties is essential. In addition, if your thesis contains sensitive or confidential information you will need to apply for a dispensation from consultation.    Find out more about what you need to do to ensure that you can deposit your thesis at our workshop  WISER: Your thesis, copyright and ORA  on Friday 27 January 9.15-10.15)   > book your place.

Research: Maximising visibility using ORA

Ensuring that your research is visible is becoming more and more important as grant applications and the REF focus increasingly on research impact.     One easy way to increase your visibility is to deposit your research in the Oxford Research Archive (ORA). Come along to our training session on Monday 28th November to find out:

  • How to deposit your articles, posters, conference papers and other research outputs in ORA
  • How to use  Symplectic to keep track of your publications and to add items to ORA
  • Find out about copyright and other rights issues when making your research available online.

This session will take place on Monday 28 November 9.15-12.15 at Oxford University Computing Services.    Please book your place online.