SafePod at the SSL now available for Booking

The SafePod Network (SPN) is a major new research innovation to provide and manage a network of standardised safe settings (SafePods) across the UK for data that requires secure access for research purposes. A SafePod provides the physical security and controls for a researcher to access such data and includes a door control access system, CCTV, wheelchair accessibility and a height adjustable desk with monitor.

All SafePods operate under the same policies and procedures and provide researchers, once accredited, with access to datasets from participating data centres and archives. This includes:

Booking the University of Oxford SafePod

The University of Oxford SafePod is in the Social Science Library and can be booked and used by researchers internal and external to the University. SafePod bookings must be made from the SPN website. Bookings cannot be made at the Social Science Library.

The University of Oxford SafePod is available 10am–4pm on weekdays, excluding periods when the Social Science Library is closed.

More information

For general enquiries about the SafePod Network, contact 01334 463901 or email safepodnetwork@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Maintenance work 13-24 September

There will be some works taking place from 13-24 September to create a fire evacuation route between the Library Administrator’s office (behind the SafePod), and the Manor Road Building locker room.

Some lockers will be removed from the locker room. Some noise from the works may be audible in the library during this time. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause.

Our Book of the Month choice for September

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

Subject Consultant Andy Kernot stood by some book shelves in the SSL selecting a geography book

 

September’s book of the month was selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies.

The cover of the book Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall. It has a blue background (to represent the sea) and part of a map of the world on top, which is filled with geographical terms.

 

 

 

Prisoner of Geography: Ten maps that tell you everything you need to know about global politics

Tim Marshall

Elliott and Thompson Limited, 2016

Available as an eBook or a hard copy can be found in the SSL at JC319.MAR 2016

Why was it chosen?

All leaders are constrained by geography. Their choices are limited by mountains, rivers, seas and concrete. Yes, to follow world events you need to understand people, ideas and movements – but if you don’t know geography, you’ll never have the full picture.

If you’ve ever wondered why Putin is so obsessed with Crimea, why the USA was destined to become a global superpower, or why China’s power base continues to expand ever outwards, the answers are all here. It’s time to put the ‘geo’ back into geopolitics.

Book Overview

In ten chapters (covering Russia; China; the USA; Latin America; the Middle East; Africa; India and Pakistan; Europe; Japan and Korea; and the Arctic), using maps, essays and occasionally the personal experiences of the widely travelled author, Prisoners of Geography looks at the past, present and future to offer an essential insight into one of the major factors that determines world history.

Reviews

“Quite simply, one of the best books about geopolitics you could imagine: reading it is like having a light shone on your understanding… Marshall is clear-headed, lucid and possessed of an almost uncanny ability to make the broad picture accessible and coherent … the book is, in a way which astonished me, given the complexities of the subject, unputdownable… I can’t think of another book that explains the world situation so well.”

Nicholas Lezard, Evening Standard

“Compels a fresh way of looking at maps – not just as objects for orientation or works of art, but as guideposts to the often thorny relations between nations”

The New York Times

“a timely reminder that despite technological advances, geography is always there, often forcing the hand of world leaders.” 

Mark Cooper-Jones, Geographical

How can I access it?

This title is available in hard copy at the SSL at shelfmark JC319.MAR 2016 to consult in the library. It is also available on SOLO for Oxford University staff and students to access remotely using your SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Accessing the SSL from Monday 6 September

Student sat studying at a desk in the SSL

photo (c) John Cairns

From Monday 6 September, the Bodleian Libraries will be stopping Space Finder and the requirement to book a time slot to use libraries and reading rooms for all readers. No time slots from that date will therefore be available on Space Finder. This change applies to the Social Science Library.

The Click and Collect borrowing service will also be stopping.

We will still:

  • Strongly encourage readers to wear face coverings in our library spaces
  • Request readers scan the NHS Test and Trace QR codes displayed in our entrance area
  • Encourage all library users to limit close contact and respect others
  • Maintain an increased level of cleaning in our library

Visit the Bodleian Libraries Service Updates webpage for all the latest information

Our Book of the Month choice for August

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

August’s book of the month was selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development, Forced Migration, and African & Commonwealth Studies Subject Consultant.

 

 

 

 

No Go World: How fear is redrawing our maps and infecting our politics

Andersson, Ruben

University of California Press, 2019

Available as an eBook or a hard copy can be found in the SSL at JA76.AND 2019

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen as it explores ‘how risk, danger and fear are ‘remapping’ the world with dire ethical and practical consequences’ (Journal of Refugee Studies).

Book Overview

War-torn deserts, jihadist killings, trucks weighted down with contraband and migrants—from the Afghan-Pakistan borderlands to the Sahara, images of danger depict a new world disorder on the global margins. With vivid detail, Ruben Andersson traverses this terrain to provide a startling new understanding of what is happening in remote “danger zones.” Instead of buying into apocalyptic visions, Andersson takes aim at how Western states and international organizations conduct military, aid, and border interventions in a dangerously myopic fashion, further disconnecting the world’s rich and poor. Using drones, proxy forces, border reinforcement, and outsourced aid, risk-obsessed powers are helping to remap the world into zones of insecurity and danger. The result is a vision of chaos crashing into fortified borders, with national and global politics riven by fear. Andersson contends that we must reconnect and snap out of this dangerous spiral, which affects us whether we live in Texas or Timbuktu. Only by developing a new cartography of hope can we move beyond the political geography of fear that haunts us.

Reviews

‘This beautifully written book takes us on a journey through the distanced interventions of the war on terror showing how, in these global times, efforts to push risk ever further away end up bringing it closer creating the basis for a no go world. Full of ideas and stories, and with hope as well as pessimism, it is the sort of book that needs to be read slowly.’

Mary Kaldor, Professor of Global Governance, London School of Economics

‘One of the best books available on what is commonly perceived in the West as the refugee crisis but is in fact a world rent by fear and conflict, with refugees as one symptom.

Craig Calhoun, University Professor of Social Sciences, Arizona State University, and former Director of the London School of Economic

How can I access it?

This title is available in hard copy at the SSL at shelfmark JA76.AND 2019. If you’ve booked a study space in the library you can find it on our shelves, alternatively, if you can borrow books from our library, place a Click & Collect request for it. It is also available on SOLO for Oxford University staff and students to access remotely using your SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Maintenance Work taking place in the Library on Mon 2 August

Person wearing a high-viz jacket with their hand in a stop motion, holding a 'men at work' sign
On the morning of Monday 2 August a small part of the Reader PCs area will be inaccessible while some maintenance work takes place.

The first two desks of PCs including the Bloomberg and Eikon PCs will be moved up against the bookshelves and will be unavailable for use, along with a small section of the book collection.

The self-issue machine will still be available, as will the remaining desks of Reader PCs, including the height adjustable desk with PC; readers will need to walk around the bookshelves in order to access them.

Current COVID 19 Health Guidance to remain in place in Bodleian Libraries from 19 July

A staff member and reader stood at the SSL Issue Desk wearing face masks

The University will maintain its current COVID-19 health guidance from 19 July, including current policies on face coverings and social distancing. This decision has been taken in light of the high level of cases locally, and with due consideration to the government’s guidance that ‘everybody needs to continue to act carefully and remain cautious’. The University is entitled to keep its restrictions in place on University premises.

You must continue to wear a face covering in the Bodleian Libraries including when sitting at a desk. If you are medically exempt, we request you display an exemption card or sunflower during your visit. Alternatively you can confirm to a staff member on arrival that you are exempt to avoid being disturbed during your visit. We will not ask for details of the reasons for this exemption.

Please also continue to use the Space Finder to book your place in the library in advance.

View the Bodleian Libraries Services Updates webpage for all the latest information.

 

HathiTrust’s Emergency Temporary Access Service ends on the 31 July

Hands holding up a table with an image of some book shelves on it, in front of some book shelves.

Following the Government’s announcement of the latest easing of COVID-19 safety measures on 19 July, we are providing you with two weeks’ notice of the end of the Bodleian Libraries access to the HathiTrust’s Emergency Temporary Access Service (ETAS) on 31 July.

From 1 August we will retain access to the 4 million public domain items made available through HathiTrust and will be in a position to permit physical lending of those items which had been restricted due to the terms of the HathiTrust agreement.

Further information on the Hathi Trust and how to access titles can be found on the Bodleian Libraries HathiTrust LibGuide.

Our Book of the Month choice for July

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

July’s book of the month was selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies

 

 

 

The Big Rachet: How humanity thrives in the face of natural crisis: a biography of ingenious species

DeFries, Ruth

Basic Books, 2014

Available in hard copy in the SSL

 

Why was it chosen?

Our species long lived on the edge of starvation. Now we produce enough food for all 7 billion of us to eat nearly 3,000 calories every day. This is such an astonishing thing in the history of life as to verge on the miraculous. The Big Ratchet is the story of how it happened, of the ratchets — the technologies and innovations, big and small — that propelled our species from hunters and gatherers on the savannahs of Africa to shoppers in the aisles of the supermarket.

Book Overview

The Big Ratchet itself came in the twentieth century, when a range of technologies — from fossil fuels to scientific plant breeding to nitrogen fertilizers — combined to nearly quadruple our population in a century, and to grow our food supply even faster. To some, these technologies are a sign of our greatness; to others, of our hubris. MacArthur fellow and Columbia University professor Ruth DeFries argues that the debate is the wrong one to have. Limits do exist, but every limit that has confronted us, we have surpassed. That cycle of crisis and growth is the story of our history; indeed, it is the essence of The Big Ratchet. Understanding it will reveal not just how we reached this point in our history, but how we might survive it.

Reviews

“The Big Ratchet” is a well-researched and highly readable account of how we came to be a ‘world dominating urban species’, and the opportunities and threats we will face in feeding a world of 9 billion people with only a small minority living in rural areas. For those who have deep concerns about our ability to meet future food needs, this book provides at least some reassurance that we have done it before.”
Nature Geoscience

“A page turner and an eye opener, clearly written and well told. If you are alive today, especially if you live in a city, this is the story of how you got here and why you eat what you eat. Defries deftly guides us through our species’ unending quest to squeeze more food out of the earth, introducing us along the way to buffalo bone pickers, ancient plant breeders, guano wars, the extinction of the Rocky Mountain Locust, medieval human poop tradesmen, Arctic “doomsday” seed vaults and the Nobel Prizes awarded to the inventors of DDT and trans fats. A fascinating history of human innovation.”
Science News

How can I access it?

This title is available in hard copy at the SSL at shelfmark GF75.DEF 2014. If you’ve booked a study space in the library you can find it on our shelves, alternatively, if you can borrow books from our library, place a Click & Collect request for it.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.