Our Book of the Month choice for December

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

Andy Kernot choosing a book from the shelves in the SSL

December’s Book of the Month was selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies.

 

 

Ice: Nature and Culture

Klaus Dodds

Available as an eBook.

 

 

 

It was chosen because it provides a wide-ranging exploration of the cultural, natural and geopolitical history of ice, revealing how throughout history human communities have made sense of ice.  For those who are intrigued about our relationship with ice, this book will provide an informative and thought-provoking guide.

Book Overview

Ice has played a prominent role in the history of the earth and its living communities for millennia. We have had fun with and on ice, battled over ice, imagined ice, struggled with ice and made money out of ice. It has transformed our relationship with food, and our engagement with ice has been captured in art, literature, popular film and television, as well as made manifest in sport and leisure. Our lakes, mountains and coastlines have been indelibly shaped by the advance and retreat of ice and snow. Beyond Planet Earth, ice can be found in meteors, planets and moons, and scientists think that ice-rich asteroids played a pivotal role in bringing water to Earth.

Reviews

“Dodds’s addition to the Earth series provides an introduction to the many ways ice can be viewed and understood, and presents the frozen material in a way which is extremely accessible to a non-expert audience. Ice: Nature and Culture is abundantly illustrated, with the 95 illustrations that pepper the 211-page volume providing engaging visual material that supports the prose. The book draws on the history and significance of ice in areas as varied as geopolitics, scientific research, literature, and sport. Despite this eclectic amalgamation of subject matter, Dodds has deftly linked each chapter to the previous one, drawing together the ways in which ice has shaped our understanding of the world, and our relationship to this phenomenon. . . . Fantastically written and well-researched. . . . This is a great book for the lay polar enthusiast.”

Polar Journal

“In Ice: Nature and Culture, Dodds gives the slippery and ephemeral material center stage to show how ice is not only fascinating but fundamental to human life itself. As a part of Reaktion Books’ Earth series, Dodds’s exploration of ice is both a literary and a visual pleasure to read, with beautiful color photographs throughout the book. . . . Wide-ranging.”

Cultural Geographies

“Transform[s] ice from frozen water into something remarkable: a substance always on the edge of our understanding. Once the instability of ice made it something to be claimed and conquered; today, however, this quality is inextricable from human interference. ‘The tone of the conversation’ about ice, Dodds writes, has been imbued with ‘a profound sense of loss.’ With the disappearance of ice comes the loss of cultures and languages that have evolved to express its complexity.”

Times Literary Supplement

How can I access it?

This title is available to consult as an eBook. Access it from a Bodleian Library computer or use it remotely, by logging on to SOLO with your SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for November

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

November’s Book of the Month was selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations.

 

 

Digital Technology and Democratic Theory

Edited by Lucy Bernholz et al.

Available as an eBook.

 

 

 

 

It was chosen because it brings together a range of contributors to explore how new digital technologies are reshaping our understanding of democracy and democratic theory.

Book Overview

This book looks closely at how technology is radically changing our lives as citizens and participants in democratic governments. To understand these transformations, the editors bring today contributions by scholars from multiple disciplines to wrestle with the question of how digital technologies shape, reshape and affect fundamental questions about democracy and democratic theory.

Reviews

“This volume is a timely and essential addition that will help its audience understand the affordances—but also the very real detrimental effects—of social media in society on our governing principles and institutions.”

Sarah T. Roberts, University of California

 “This diverse collection of essays addresses how to reimagine the informational diet of democracy, free speech and association, the boundaries of the demos and political exclusion. An important and engaging read!”

Beth Simone Noveck, director, The Governance Lab

“The original potential of the volume lies in promoting cross-disciplinary scholarship on questions of democracy in the digital age. Thus, for scholars and students of a variety of disciplines including media studies, social science and the humanities, as well as engineers, the volume is essential reading.”

Rahel Süß, London School of Economics and Political Science

How can I access it?

This title is available to consult as an eBook. Access it from a Bodleian Library computer or use it remotely, by logging on to SOLO with your SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Black History Month at the SSL

For October, we’ve replaced part of our usual new books display with a display highlighting the theme of black history throughout our subjects. The display has been produced by the graduate trainee, with the content put forward by subject librarians.

The Black History Month display at the Social Science, featuring four books with accompanying recommendations, as well as the front covers of several ebooks.

Politics and International Relations: Jo Gardner

Jo really enjoyed engaging with the project, and produced several recommendations; we’ve chosen to highlight the print copies in the library, which are Patrick Vernon and Angelina Osborne’s 100 Great Black Britons, and Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law. Jo’s contributions also included ebooks which has provided a small ‘further reading’ addition to the display. Links for these can be found at the end of this post too.

100 Great Black Britons  Patrick Vernon and Angelina Osborne

The front cover of 100 Great Black Britains, featuring black and white text over a simplified black and white version of the union flag.

“This book is timely and so important. Especially now during the Black Lives Matter movement, people all over the country are looking to expand their knowledge of Black British historical figures and this book will help people to do just that.” – Dawn Butler MP

“An empowering read . . . it is refreshing to see somebody celebrate the role that black Britons have played in this island’s long and complicated history.” – David Lammy in ‘The Best Books of 2020’ The Guardian

100 Great Black Britons is only available as a print copy in the library, and its record on SOLO can be found here.

 

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America – Richard Rothstein

The Front Cover of Rothstein's 'The Color of Law', with text displayed over a 'redlined' urban zoning map.

“A powerful and disturbing history of residential segregation in America. [..] One of the great strengths of Rothstein’s account is the sheer weight of evidence he marshals. […] While the road forward is far from clear, there is no better history of this troubled journey than ‘The Color of Law.'” – David Oshinsky, New York Times

“Rothstein’s comprehensive and engrossing book reveals just how the U.S. arrived at the ‘systematic racial segregation we find in metropolitan areas today, ‘ focusing in particular on the role of government.” – Starred review in Publishers Weekly

The Color of Law is only available as a print copy in the library, and its record on SOLO can be found here.

Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies: Andy Kernot

Andy Kernot recommended Black Faces, White Spaces, and wrote the blurb below, which looks at a more contemporary relationship between black communities and the environment, of interest to Geographers and Environment Studies students.

Black faces, white spaces : reimagining the relationship of African Americans to the great outdoors – Carolyn Finney

The Cover of Black Faces, White Spaces. A black person obscures their face with a painted portrait of another head, while sitting beside a waterfall.

Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the “great outdoors” and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. – Andy Kernot

Besides the physical copies in the library, there is also a link to the e-book here.

 

International Development, Forced Migration, and African & Commonwealth Studies: Sarah Rhodes

Sarah Rhodes chose to recommend Voices of the Windrush Generation, of interest to students in International Development and Commonwealth Studies for its first hand account of the post-Colonial relationship between Britain and the Caribbean. Its outlook is based in individual experience, which also makes it more accessible for the general reader.

Voices of the Windrush Generation – David Matthews

This book details the personal testimonies of the many migrants who arrived in Britain in the early 1950s from the Caribbean. Through their own voices and stories we learn of the struggles they faced as they created communities and navigated integration into an often hostile society. Their resilience shines through as the book celebrates their contribution to black British culture we have today. – Sarah Rhodes

Voices of the Windrush Generation is only available as a print copy in the library, but its catalogue record can be accessed here.

Further Reading: e-Books

The following are e-books that we wanted to highlight, you can click each to go through to its solo record and e-book.

Invisible Voices: The Black Presence in Crime and Punishment in the UK, 1750-1900 – Martin Glynn

Available online here.

 

Who’s Black and Why? A Hidden Chapter from the Eighteenth-Century Invention of Race – Edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Andrew S. Curran

Available online here.

Teaching Black History to White People – Leonard N. Moore

Available online here.

Feel free to pop by and pick up one of these books, or come and tell us if you’re read something that should be featured too!

Our Book of the Month choice for October

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

October’s Book of the Month was selected by John Southall, Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology.

 

 

 

 

Value chains: the new economic imperialism

Intan Suwandi

Available at HD5852.SUW 2019 but currently on display at our New Books Display Area.

 

 

 

Winner of the 2018 Paul A. Baran-Paul M. Sweezy Memorial Award for original work regarding the political economy of imperialism, it was chosen because of the insights it provides into recent structural developments in the global economy

Book Overview

In Value Chains, Suwandi investigates the processes through which multinational corporations, located primarily in the Global North, capture value from the Global South. She considers various current corporate strategies that enforce “economical” and “flexible” production. This includes labour management methods that serve to maintain the imperial dominance of the North, while continuing the dependency of the Global South and polarizing the global economy.

Case studies of Indonesian suppliers exemplify the growing burden borne by the workers of the Global South, whose labour creates the surplus value that enriches the economy of the North, as well as the secondary capitals of the South.

Suwandi’s richly documented book depicts in detail the relations of unequal exchange that structure today’s world economy.

Reviews

“This is a marvellous, highly accessible book. It zeroes in on global value chains, the most important transformation of the neoliberal era, and weaves excellent theoretical insights and empirical research into a notable contribution to literature on global political economy and Marxist theories of imperialism.”

John Smith, author, Imperialism in the Twenty-First Century

“In a brisk 172 pages, Suwandi piles on the evidence that power is an important element in describing behaviours of firms and persistent global inequalities.”

Alexandra Eisenbarth, The New School Economic Review, 11 (2021)

How can I access it?

A hard copy can be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk), which can be borrowed by Oxford University students and staff. It is usually shelved at HD5852.SUW 2019.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for September

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

September’s book of the month was selected by Helen Worrell, Subject Consultant for Anthroplogy.

 

 

After society: anthropological trajectories out of Oxford

Edited by Joao de Pina-Cabral and Glen Bowman

Berghahn Books

Available at GN25.AFT 2020 but currently on display at our New Books Display Area.

 

 

It was chosen to introduce the newly moved Anthropology collections and highlight the recent history of Oxford’s Anthropology department.

Book Overview

In the early 1980s, when the contributors to this volume completed their graduate training at Oxford, the conditions of practice in anthropology were undergoing profound change. Professionally, the immediate postcolonial period was over and neoliberal reforms were marginalizing the social sciences.  Here self-ethnography is used to portray the contributors’ anthropological trajectories, showing how analytical and academic engagements interacted creatively over time.

Reviews

“This volume provides a valuable mix of autobiographical reflections on what it was to be a student of anthropology at Oxford at a particular time in the Institute’s history. Such reflections are all the more insightful, written as they are, by former students who by now have had largely successful (indeed very successful) careers in the discipline.”

Elizabeth Ewart, University of Oxford

How can I access it?

A hard copy can be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk), which can be borrowed by Oxford University students and staff. It is usually shelved at GN25.AFT 2020.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for August

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

August’s book of the month was selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development, Forced Migration, and African & Commonwealth Studies.

 

 

 

 

Contemporary boat migration: data, geopolitics and discourses

Edited by Elaine Burroughs and Kira Williams

Rowman & Littlefield International

Available at KZ6530.CON 2018 but currently on display at our New Books Display Area.

 

 

It was chosen to highlight migration at sea, an issue which is becoming more frequent and precarious as states increasingly make entry illegal.

Book Overview

As migration at sea becomes more common, it has gained attention from a range of actors, including enforcement authorities, political elites, media, and non/inter-governmental organizations. The sea has thus become a space of hope/desperation for migrants as well as conflict over territory and sovereignty, representing wider social debates in and beyond Australia, Canada, the European Union, and the United States. Current literature on migration by boat reflects these debates, primarily concentrating on the humanitarian and legal realities of migration by boat and border enforcement at sea, however, few studies have analysed their empirical relationship. This edited volume aims to fill this gap.

Reviews

‘Contemporary Boat Migration’ offers an original and interdisciplinary take on migration by considering people who move from one country to another via sea routes.  The chapters provide rich empirical insights, comprehensive examinations of legal regimes, and analyses of representations of people who migrate by boat.  This volume marks an important contribution to the understudies area of migration by sea’.

Tanya Golash-Boza, Professor of Sociology, University of California.

How can I access it?

A hard copy can be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk), which can be borrowed by Oxford University students and staff. It is usually shelved at KZ6530.CON 2018. This title is also available as an eLegal Deposit Book via SOLO. eLegal Deposit material can only be accessed via a Bodleian Libraries computer

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for July

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

Andy Kernot selecting a book from the SSL book shelves.

 

July’s book of the month was selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies.

 

The cover of the book 'Why are health disparities everyone's problem?' a rosette is next to the book which says 'SSL Book of the Month' on it.

 

Why are health disparities everyone’s problem?

Lisa A. Cooper

Hopkins University Press, 2021

Available at RA418.COO 2021 but currently on display at our New Books Display Area.

 

 

It was chosen because it examines how we can all work together to eliminate the avoidable injustices that plague our health care system and society. Health is determined by far more than a person’s choices and behaviors such as social and political conditions, economic forces or physical environments. Many of these factors are derived from of unequal opportunities and unjust treatment for people of color and other vulnerable communities. But they aren’t the only ones who suffer because of these disparities―everyone is impacted by the factors that degrade health for the least advantaged among us.

Book Overview

In Why Are Health Disparities Everyone’s Problem? Dr. Lisa Cooper shows how we can work together to eliminate the injustices that plague our health care system and society. The book follows Cooper’s journey from her childhood in Liberia, West Africa, to her thirty-year career working first as a clinician and then as a health equity researcher at Johns Hopkins University. Drawing on her experiences, it explores how differences in communication and the quality of relationships affect health outcomes. Through her work as the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity, it details the actions and policies needed to reduce and eliminate the conditions that are harming us all.

Cooper reveals with compelling detail how health disparities are crippling our health care system and society, driving up health care costs, leading to adverse health outcomes and ultimately an enormous burden of human suffering. Why Are Health Disparities Everyone’s Problem? demonstrates the ways in which everyone’s health is interconnected, both within communities and across the globe. Cooper calls for a new kind of herd immunity, when a sufficiently high proportion of people, across race and social class, become immune to harmful social conditions through “vaccination” with solidarity among groups and opportunities created by institutional and societal practices and policies. By acknowledging and acting upon that interconnectedness, she believes everyone can help to create a healthier world.

Reviews

“Dr. Cooper’s personal and professional journey is both riveting and inspiring; the scenes from her childhood in Liberia alone offer a global history lesson that resonates in present-day America. The unique experiences she brings to this unprecedented moment of the intersection of community health and racial reckoning make Why Are Health Disparities Everyone’s Problem? not only an essential read but a central question for our time.”

Marc H. Morial, President/CEO, National Urban League / former Mayor of New Orleans

“In this commanding narrative, Dr. Lisa Cooper—groundbreaking researcher, MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius,’ founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity—outlines innovative health equity solutions that can move us toward a societal ‘herd immunity’ where we’re tackling not just clinical disease but the deep-seeded impacts of structural racism.”

Garth Graham, MD, MPH, Global Head of Public Health, Google Inc. / former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health, US Department of Health and Human Services

“A compelling and enlightening record of Dr. Cooper’s journey of awakening to the origins and widespread impacts of health disparities and to the need for health equity in local and global communities. She shares the richness of her experiences and the piercing insights that have fueled her celebrated quest to unmask the underlying causes of and to propose solutions for the pervasive and persistent disparities whose deleterious effects in disadvantaged communities have broad effects on all others.”

James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD, Emory University School of Medicine / Chairman Emeritus, Partnership for a Healthier America, and author of Dr. Gavin’s Health Guide for African Americans: How to Keep Yourself and Your Children Well

How can I access it?

A hard copy can be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk), which can be borrowed by Oxford University students and staff. It is usually shelved at RA418.COO 2021. This title is also available as an eBook via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access the title remotely using their SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for June

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

June’s book of the month was selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations.

 

 

How social movements can save democracy: democratic innovations from below

Donatella della Porta

Polity, 2020

Available at HM881.DEL 2020 but currently on display at our New Books Display Area.

 

 

 

It was chosen because because the author explores a range of opportunities for institutions to encourage direct democracy through popular participation.

Book Overview

Leading political sociologist Donatella della Porta analyses the role that social movements have long played in fostering and deepening democracy. The author investigates contemporary innovations in times of crisis, particularly crowd-sourced constitutions, referendums from below and movement parties, and she reflects on the advantages and limitations of these alternative politics.

Reviews

“An engaging read by one of Europe’s leading scholars of contentious politics.”
Sidney Tarrow, Cornell University

“This is an extremely important book by one of today’s key thinkers on democracy and a poignant rejoinder to those who have responded to the democratic crisis with elitism.”
Gianpaolo Baiocchi, New York University

How can I access it?

A hard copy can also be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk), which can be borrowed by Oxford University students and staff. It is usually shelved at HM881.DEL 2020.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for May

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

Image of John Southall (Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology) sat in the SSL Data Area

 

May’s book of the month was selected by John Southall, Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology.

 

 

Image of the cover of the book False economy: a surprising economic history of the Word. A rossette is next to it, which says the words 'Book of the Month' on it.

 

False economy: a surprising economic history of the World

Alan Beattie

Penguin Books, 2010

Available at HC51.BEA 2010 and as an eBook via SOLO.

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen because of the way Alan Beattie – Financial Times world trade editor – combines economic history, psychology and political analysis to identify the factors that predispose economies to sickness or health.

Book Overview

False Economy takes a look at the many and varied factors that shape contemporary societies and economies and what effects these factors have had on economic success. The author weaves together the economic choices, political choices, economic history, and human stories, that determine whether governments and countries remain rich or poor.

He also addresses larger questions about why they make the choices they do, and what those mean for the future of our global economy. False Economy is a lively and lucid book that engagingly and thought-provokingly examines macroeconomics, economic topics, and the fault lines and successes that can make or break a culture or induce a global depression.

Reviews

“This Lively book is a quirky, selective history of the world emphasizing economic endowments and incentives.” Foreign Affairs

Each chapter is themed – cities, religion and so on – and the individual stories are mesmerising.” Financial Times.

How can I access it?

This title is available as an eBook via SOLO. It is an electronic legal deposit item, which means it can only be viewed from a Bodleian Libraries reading room PC. A hard copy can also be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk), which is for library use only. It is usually shelved at HC51.BEA 2010.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for April

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

Sarah Rhodes looking at the SSL shelves and selecting some books.

 

April’s book of the month was selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development, Forced Migration, African and Commonwealth Studies.

 

 

 

 

The cover of the book features an illustration by Ibrahim El-Salahi entitled 'Vision of the Tomb.' To the right of the book is an image of a rosette with the words 'SSL Book of the Month' on it.

 

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee & Forced Migration Studies

Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh et al.

Oxford University Press, 2016

Available at HV640.OXF 2014HV640.OXF 2016 and as an eBook via SOLO.

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen in light of the war in Ukraine and the unprecedented movement of people, both within the country and fleeing across borders. This handbook considers the links between the academic study of forced migration and the advocacy necessary to help those forcibly displaced not only in Europe but worldwide.

Book Overview

This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 53 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Reviews

‘The chapters of this Handbook carefully examine all the key elements for the protection of refugees, displaced persons, migrants and other people on the move, identifying both obstacles and opportunities that are relevant to our work and should rightly be contemplated by students of forced migration’

Forward by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

How can I access it?

This title is available as an eBook via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access the title remotely using their SSO. A hard copy can be found on our New Books Display Area (around the corner from our Issue Desk) and on the shelves at HV640.OXF 2014 and HV640.OXF 2016.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.