Our Book of the Month choice for December

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

Picture of the front cover of our December Book of the month. Book titled Handbook on Critical Geographies of Migration. Cover has a blue background with image of boats filled with people

 

Handbook on Critical Geographies of Migration

Edited by Katharyne Mitchell et al.

Edward Elgar, 2019

Available as an eBook.

Image of Subject Consultant Sarah Rhodes selecting books from the book shelves in the Bodleian Social Science Library

 

 

 

December’s book of the month was selected by Sarah Rhodes Subject Consultant for International Development, Forced Migration, African and Commonwealth Studies.  

Why was it chosen?

It was selected to tie in with International Migrants Day on 18th December 2020.

Book Overview

Border walls, shipwrecks in the Mediterranean, separated families at the border, island detention camps: migration is at the centre of contemporary political and academic debates. This ground-breaking Handbook offers an exciting and original analysis of critical research on themes such as these, drawing on cutting-edge theories from an interdisciplinary and international group of leading scholars. With a focus on spatial analysis and geographical context, this volume highlights a range of theoretical, methodological and regional approaches to migration research, while remaining attuned to the underlying politics that bring critical scholars together. Divided into six thematic sections, including new areas in critical migration research, the book covers the key questions galvanizing migration scholars today, such as issues surrounding refugees and border militarization. Each chapter explores new themes, expanding on core theories to convey fresh insight to contemporary research. A key resource for migration, refugee and border studies this Handbook provides an in-depth analysis of the topic, covering a vast array of research ideas with a specific focus on the geographical aspects of migration. Scholars working on migration, refugees, asylum, transnationalism, humanitarianism and borders will find this an invaluable read.

How can I access it?

This title is available as an eBook via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access eBooks remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heart

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for November

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

How population change will transform our world

by Sarah Harper

Oxford University Press, 2016

HB887.HAR 2016

eBook available here

 

 

November’s book of the month was selected by Andy Kernot. Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy, Internet Studies and Public Policy. 

Why was it chosen?

This book examines the challenges that will come with population changes over the 21st Century, highlighting current trends including the fall in birth rates across the world and also the fall in death rates after the age of 65.

Book Overview

Predicting the shape of our future populations is vital for installing the infrastructure, welfare, and provisions necessary for society to survive. There are many opportunities and challenges that will come with the changes in our populations over the 21st century. In this new addition to the 21st Century Challenges series, Sarah Harper works to dispel myths such as the fear of unstoppable global growth resulting in a population explosion, or that climate change will lead to the mass movement of environmental refugees; and instead considers the future shape of our populations in light of demographic trends in fertility, mortality, and migration, and their national and global impact.

Reviews

An excellent, succinct guide.

Robert Mayhew, Literary Review

… provides a powerful reminder that debates over immigrations, social welfare, and inequality will intensify in the decades ahead.

Foreign Affairs

Global Change is a major concern of the Martin Institute, and this book is a solid contribution in that area. It presents a comprehensive and balanced treatment of global demography … The text is […] enlivened by brief narratives on the life experiences and aspirations of young persons in the various regions.

L. MacK, Population and Development Review

Sarah Harper provides a fascinating graphically illustrated and well researched summary of current demographic trends.

Jonathan Cowie, Concatenation

How can I access it?

There are 2 eBooks available of this title via SOLO. One via ProQuest eBook Central and one via EBSCO. Oxford University staff and students can access them remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

We also have 2 copies of the book available to borrow on our open shelves at HB887.HAR 2016.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for October

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

Black British History: new perspectives

Edited by Hakim Adi

Zed Books, 2019

eBook available here

 

 

October’s book of the month was selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen to tie in with Black History Month.

Book Overview

The University has a long history of attracting Black scholars from Africa, the Caribbean, America and Australia since the matriculation in 1873 of Christian Fredrick Cole, who became the first African to practise in an English court. He was followed by Alain Locke, the Father of the Harlem Renaissance and the first Black scholar to be awarded a Rhodes Scholarship in 1907; Kofoworola Moore, the first African woman to graduate from the University in 1935; Eric Williams, the great historian of the Caribbean, who was elected Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago. Students from all parts of Africa, the Caribbean and the Commonwealth have made significant contributions to politics, literature, science and the arts. Uncovering the stories of prominent and lesser-known Black students at Oxford, Pamela Roberts reveals a hitherto undocumented strand in the University’s history and its relationship with the wider world.

Reviews

“The book is a landmark in the study of social psychology and voter choice.”
Kenneth Bunker, Democratization

“There is a lot to appreciate and admire about Norris and Inglehart’s latest book. Those intrigued by and concerned about today’s political currents in democratic societies can learn a great deal from Cultural Backlash. I recommend picking it up for the narrative, reading on for the depth and nuance, and reflecting on the ideas for inspiration.”
Jennifer Fitzgerald, Political Psychology

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month Choice for September

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

Measuring poverty around the world

by Anthony B. Atkinson

Princeton University Press, 2019

HC79.P6.ATK 2019

eBook available here

 

 

September’s book of the month was selected by John Southall, Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology.

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen because of the way it shows the importance of evidence, data and measurement in properly understanding Poverty as a concern of the Social Sciences.

Book Overview

The final book from a pioneer in the study of poverty and inequality offers an inspiring analysis of a central question: What is poverty and how much of it is there around the globe?

The persistence of poverty – in rich and poor countries alike – is one of the most serious problems facing us in the 21st Century. Better measurement of poverty is essential for raising awareness, motivating action, designing good policy, gauging progress, and holding political leaders accountable. To help make this possible, Atkinson provides a critically important examination of how poverty is – and should be – measured. Bringing together evidence about the nature and extent of poverty across the world and including case studies of sixty countries, Atkinson addresses both financial poverty and other indicators of deprivation. He starts from first principles about the meaning of poverty, translates these into concrete measures, and analyses the data to which the measures can be applied. Crucially, he integrates international organizations’ measurements of poverty with countries’ own national analyses.

Reviews

“In a rapidly changing world, with ever mounting global problems, researchers would do well to follow Atkinson’s socially conscious, ethically informed, and policy relevant approach to research and problem solving.”

Brian Colgan, Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics.

“To assure that progress against poverty is maintained and hopefully accelerated, the type of intellectually honest, scholarly yet socially committed, research exemplified by Tony Atkinson throughout his career will be needed in spades.”

Martin Ravallion, Journal of Economic Inequality.

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

A print copy is also available on our open shelves at HC79.P6.ATK 2019

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

 

Our Book of the Month Choice for August

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

Research methods in conflict settings:  a view from below

by Dyan E Mazurana & Karen Jacobsen

Cambridge University Press, 2013

eBook available here

 

 

August’s book of the month was selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development and Forced Migration Studies.

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen to consider the additional challenges faced by researchers in undertaking research in the ever-changing and heightened sensitivities of conflict zones.

Book Overview

Increasing numbers of researchers are now working in regions experiencing high levels of conflict or crisis, or among populations that have fled violent conflict to become refugees or internally displaced persons. Understanding these conflicts and their aftermath should be shaped not only by the victors and their elite companions but also by the local people whose daily lives become intertwined with the conflict – and it is this “view from below” that this volume’s authors seek to share. However, conducting rigorous research in these kinds of field contexts presents a range of ethical, methodological, logistical, and security challenges not usually confronted in non-conflict field contexts. This volume compiles a rich variety of lessons learned by experienced field researchers, many of whom have faced demanding situations characterized by violence, profound and well-grounded distrust, and social fragmentation. The authors’ offer options, ideas, and techniques for studying the situations of people affected by conflict and, by focusing on ethical and security issues, seek ways to safeguard the interests and integrity of the research “subjects” and of the researchers and their teams.

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

 

Our Book of the Month Choice for July

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

The water paradox: overcoming the global crisis in water management

by Edward B. Barbier

Yale University Press, 2019

eBook available here

 

 

 

 

The Book of the Month for July has been selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy, Internet Studies and Public Policy. 

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen because it highlights how much something that we take for granted, water, is under threat by human mismanagement and what we can do to resolve this.

Book Overview

Water is essential to life, yet humankind’s relationship with water is complex. For millennia, we have perceived it as abundant and easily accessible. But water shortages are fast becoming a persistent reality for all nations, rich and poor. With demand outstripping supply, a global water crisis is imminent. In this trenchant critique of current water policies and practices, Edward Barbier argues that our water crisis is as much a failure of water management as it is a result of scarcity. Outdated governance structures and institutions, combined with continual underpricing, have perpetuated the overuse and undervaluation of water and disincentivized much-needed technological innovation. As a result “water grabbing” is on the rise, and cooperation to resolve these disputes is increasingly fraught. Barbier draws on evidence from countries across the globe to show the scale of the problem, and outlines the policy and management solutions needed to avert this crisis.

Reviews

‘’Edward Barbier does a fabulous job educating the reader on the state of water in the world and on ways to address associated water-issues. While the book is written for a non-technical audience, it is essential reading for water professionals and policy makers.’’

Ariel Dinar, Distinguished Professor of Environmental Economics and Policy at the University of California, Riverside.

Barbier is the go-to person on water and water scarcity. This is a comprehensive guide for anyone who cares about one of the most important issues in this century.”

Dieter Helm, Professor of Economic Policy at the University of Oxford and author of Natural Capital: Valuing the Planet

“Clear and compelling… recommended reading for all interested in the pressing issue of water scarcity.”

Professor Anil Markandya, Former Scientific Director at the Basque Centre for Climate Change.

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

Our Book of the Month choice for June

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

Cultural backlash: Trump, Brexit, and authoritarian populism

by Pippa Norris and Ronald Inglehart

Cambridge University Press, 2019

eBook available here

 

 

The Book of the Month for June has been selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations.

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen because it addresses the noticeable rise of authoritarian populism in Europe and the USA

Book Overview

The recent growth of support for populist political parties and the emergence of leaders with authoritarian tendencies in many Western societies have attracted much interest. The most popular theories form two groups: One sees support for populist parties being strongest among those who have benefited least from decades of globalisation. The other suggests that populist parties draw most heavily on those who have negative views on changes in society. The authors favour the second of these, and they draw on statistical data and a wide literature to make the case that patterns of voting for populist parties across Europe and the USA all show substantial intergenerational differences. 

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for May

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

The Oxford Handbook of Energy and Society

Edited by Deborah J Davidson & Matthia Gross

Oxford University Press, 2018

eBook available here

 

 

This month’s book was chosen by John Southall, Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology.

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen because of the way it shows that the study of energy production and consumption is drawing the attention of sociologists in new ways for the discipline.

Book Overview

The Oxford Handbook of Energy and Society offers a synthesis of recent developments in sociological analysis of energy-society relations, representing a wide breadth of contributors in sociology and related disciplines from across the globe.

Regional case studies of different energy resources are featured, as are the roles of politics, markets, technology, social movements, and consumers. Topics covered include: structural perspectives on energy-society relations, the persistent material and geopolitical relevance of fossil fuels, consumption processes, the inequitable distribution of energy access, energy poverty, and shifts in energy-society relationships.

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month Choice for April

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

The health of refugees: public health perspectives from crisis to settlement

Edited by Pascale Allotey and Daniel D. Reidpath.

2nd Edition, Oxford University Press, 2019

eBook available here.

 

 

 

April’s book of the month was selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development and Forced Migration Studies.

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen to highlight the health plight faced by refugees and asylum-seekers. This is even more pressing now as they face the unprecedented crisis presented by the global COVID-19 pandemic. They are more vulnerable than ever.

Book Overview

This book is a comprehensive and critical work providing an analysis of public health, international law, the history of migration and the media’s role in refugee health. With a focus on what international obligations entail when it comes to refugees and migrants, the authors present a reinforced take on our collective responsibility to leave no one behind. It traces the health repercussions on individuals and populations from the moment of forced mass movements due to conflict and other disasters, through to the progress of resettlement in other countries.

It’s multidisciplinarity, wide geographical coverage and use of case studies makes it an ideal current resource not only for public health practitioners, researchers and postgraduate students, but also for those involved in NGOs, international aid and international development.

How can I access it?

An eBook of this title is available via SOLO. Oxford University staff and students can access it remotely by logging into SOLO with their SSO.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Our Book of the Month choice for March

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

 

The social atlas of Europe

by Dimitris Ballas et al.

Polity Press, 2014

Shelfmark: GF540.BAL 2014

 

 

 

The Book of the Month for March has been selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy, Internet Studies and Public Policy.

 

 

 

 

Why was it chosen?

It was chosen because of the innovative way that it presents maps of Europe from a human geography perspective.

Book Overview

The book uses geographic information systems and new cartographic techniques to present maps of Europe based on data on a number of themes including Identity and Culture, Education, Employment, Industry and Occupation, Health, Environment and Social Cohesion. It shows the similarities and differences between European peoples both within but also beyond conventional national boundaries.

Reviews:

“Simply browsing this Social Atlas of Europe is an exhilarating experience for the lay reader: unfailingly informative, sometimes intriguing, and always entertaining. A triumph of human geography and human cartography!”

Manos Matsaganis, Athens University of Economics and Business

“The authors have used a fascinating body of techniques to display social data geographically. The results are startling and compelling, furnishing a model for everyone who does this kind of work from now on.”

Howard S. Becker, author of Telling About Society

“An insightful look at today’s Europe — not through the artifices of geographic boundaries or gross national products, but through the underlying realities that Europeans live every day – their understandings, attitudes, and well-being – all brought to life in charts and maps that reveal the human geography of this vitally important area of the world.”

Robert B. Reich, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley


Where can I find it?

We have two normal loan copies of the book. One is currently on top of our New Books Display Area (located around the corner from our Library Issue Desk). You are welcome to remove it to have a look at it or borrow it (if you are eligible to borrow items). The shelfmark for the title is GF540.BAL 2014 There is also an e-Legal Deposit version of the title which can be found on SOLO here. Please note that e-Legal Deposit material can only be viewed from Bodleian Libraries computers.

What would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.