Our Resource of the Month choice for December

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

December’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies.

Andy’s choice is Cite Them Right. It was chosen because it contains a wide range of examples of how to reference correctly in different referencing styles. Not only does it have examples of how to reference standard academic resources but also has examples for more unusual sources that are difficult to find elsewhere. These include art works, radio and television interviews as well as other media sources, and also online reports and publications.

Open laptop on a desk with the words 'Cite Them Right' on the screen. Next to it is a pen, pad and a cup of coffee.

Resource Overview

Cite Them Right is an online platform designed to advise students on how to reference correctly across eight referencing styles. Based on the best-selling book in its 12th edition, by Richard Pears and Graham Shields, this programme is trusted by institutions globally, and accessed by thousands of students daily.

What makes Cite Them Right unique is the range of referencing styles which can be accessed, including Chicago, Harvard, APA, IEEE, MLA; as well as teaching the user how to reference just about any source. This platform contains useful articles and videos which help to guide students into common queries around referencing, including how to avoid plagiarism and understanding the differences between secondary and primary sources.

Where can you access the resource

Cite Them Right can be accessed via SOLO.

Our Resource of the Month choice for November

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

November’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations

A red rectangle with a laptop to the left of it. On the screen and adjacent to it are the words 'November Resource of the Month.'

Jo’s choice is Project Syndicate. It was chosen because we are running a trial for this resource during November.

An open laptop on a wooden table. To the right is a coffee cup and the left is a notebook and pen. On the laptop screen it says 'Project Syndicate.'

Resource Overview

Project Syndicate produces and delivers original, high-quality commentaries from prominent political leaders, policymakers, scholars, business leaders, and civic activists from around the world. This online magazine also provides cutting-edge analysis and insight.

Where can you access the resource

Project Syndicate can be accessed via SOLO.

Our Resource of the Month choice for October

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

October’s Resource of the Month has been selected by John Southall, Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology.

John’s choice is Abstracts in Social Gerontology. It was chosen because it’s a database that brings together a wide range of abstracts and bibliographies from books, journals, magazines and trade publications.

Resource Overview

An essential tool for anyone interested in the field of Social Gerontology; the study of aging processes and individuals across the life course. This may include the study of physical, mental, and social changes in individuals and groups as they age; the investigation of changes in society resulting from an aging population; and the application of this knowledge to policies and programs.

Abstracts in Social Gerontology will be of interest to researchers considering the interplay of aging with demography, economics, family relations, government policy, health, institutional care, work and societal attitudes.

The coverage of this database goes back to 1990.

Where can you access the resource

Abstracts of Social Gerontology can be accessed via SOLO.

 

Our Resource of the Month choice for September

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

 

September’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Helen Worrell, Subject Consultant for Anthropology.

 

Helen’s choice is Anthropology Online. It was chosen because it brings together a wide range of written ethnographies, field notes, seminal texts, memoirs, and contemporary studies, covering human behaviour the world over.

Resource Overview

Anthropology Online brings together a wide range of written ethnographies, field notes, seminal texts, memoirs, and contemporary studies, covering human behaviour the world over. The database contains more than over 100,000 pages of full-text material, including tens of thousands of pages of previously unpublished material from major archives. Cross-searchable with Ethnographic Video Online, Alexander Street’s collection of classic and contemporary films for the anthropology classroom, Anthropology Online provides sociologists, anthropologists, cultural historians, and others with complete works of the key practitioners and theorists alike throughout the discipline.

Where can you access the resource

Anthropology Online can be accessed via SOLO.

 

Our Resource of the Month choice for August

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

 

August’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development, Forced Migration, and African & Commonwealth Studies.

 

Sarah’s choice is BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engine). This was chosen because it provides access to more than 300 million multi-disciplinary academic documents from over 8,000 content providers.  Of these 60% are Open Access in full-text.

Resource Overview

BASE, operated by the Bielefeld University Library, is one of the world’s biggest search engines for academic web resources. It indexes metadata from a wealth of sources including journals, institutional repositories and digital collections.  These resources are only included if they comply with rigorous academic quality and relevance.  Other features include precise bibliographic data displays for all search results and multilingual searching in more than 20 translated languages. BASE is an invaluable tool for readers requiring high quality grey literature material for their research.

Where can you access the resource

BASE is freely available and can be accessed via SOLO or an Internet browser.

 

 

Our Resource of the Month Choice for July: Royal Geographical Society Digital Archive

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

Andy Kernot sat at the PC in his office.

 

July’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Andy Kernot, Subject Consultant for Geography, Social Policy & Intervention, Public Policy, and Internet Studies.

 

A infographic of an open laptop. The words 'July Resource of the Month' are in front of the screen.

Andy’s choice is the Royal Geographical Society Digital Archive. It was chosen because it contains a vast collections of documents, maps, photographs, expedition reports, manuscript materials and books, that span 500 years of geography, travel and exploration. The collections material from the RGS enables contemporary researchers to critically re-assess and re-evaluate these contributions to our understanding of the world.

Open laptop on a table with a pad, pen and coffee cup next to it. On the screen it says 'Royal Geography Society Digital  Archive.'

Resource Overview

The Royal Geographical Society (RGS) Digital Archive covers history of geography exploration, colonization and de-colonization, anthropology, law, climate science, gender studies, cartography, and environmental history throughout the British Empire from ~1478 to 1953. The archive contains manuscripts, correspondence, reports, conference papers, proceedings, maps, charts, atlases, photographs, surveys, data and ephemera, all presented as fully searchable digital images that can be analyzed, downloaded, manipulated, and compared with content from other societies and universities in the Wiley Digital Archives program.

Where can you access the resource

Access the Royal Geographical Society (RGS) Digital Archive via SOLO.

 

 

Our Resource of the Month choice for June: Digital National Security Archive

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

A picture of Jo Gardner sat in her office at her desk.

 

June’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations.

An image of a laptop. In front of the screen is the wording 'June Resource of the Month.'

Jo’s choice is the Digital National Security Archive. It was chosen because it is a huge online collection of significant primary documents.

An open laptop on a table with a pad and pen and coffee next to it. On the screen it says 'Digital National Security Archive.'

Resource Overview

The Digital National Security Archive is a comprehensive collection of significant primary documents central to U.S. foreign and military policy since 1945. Over 60,000 of important, declassified documents – totalling more than 450,000 pages – are included in the database. Many are published in this collection for the first time.

Where can you access the resource

The Digital National Security Archive can be accessed via SOLO.

 

Our Resource of the Month choice for May: MISSY (Microdata Information System)

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

 

May’s Resource of the Month has been selected by John Southall, Bodleian Data Librarian and Subject Consultant for Economics and Sociology

 

 

Laptop on a table with the word MISSY on the screen. To the right of it is a coffee cup and to the left of it is a pad and pen.

John’s choice is MISSY (Microdata Information System). It was chosen because it improves the accessibility of key economic statistical datasets and the use of tools such as SPSS and Stata.

Resource Overview

MISSY is part of the service infrastructure of the German Microdata Lab. It’s an online service platform that provides structured metadata for official statistics. It includes metadata at the study and variable level as well as reports and tools for data manipulation and analysis. It covers datasets such as;

EU – LFS (European Union Labour Force Survey)

EU – SILC (European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions)

AES (Adult Education Survey)

CIS (Community Innovation Survey)

SES (Structure of Earnings Survey)

A further purpose of Missy is to ensure these datasets comply with the principles of FAIR data being Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Re-usable.

Where can you access the resource

MISSY can be accessed directly from its website platform or via the Data and Statistics for Social Sciences subject guide.

 

Our Resource of the Month for April: Border and Migration Studies Online

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians will choose an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

 

 

April’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Sarah Rhodes, Subject Consultant for International Development, Forced Migration, African and Commonwealth Studies.

An open laptop on a desk. The words 'Border & Migration Studies Online' are on the screen. Next to it are a pad, pencil and a cup of coffee.

Sarah’s choice is Border and Migration Studies Online. This is a recent subscription and was chosen because it provides resources, representing both personal and institutional perspectives, for the growing fields of border(land) studies and migration studies.

Resource Overview

Border and Migration Studies Online is a collection that explores and provides historical background on more than thirty key worldwide border areas, including: U.S. and Mexico; the European Union; Afghanistan; Israel; Turkey; The Congo; Argentina; China; Thailand; and others. Featuring at completion 100,000 pages of text, 175 hours of video, and 1,000 images, the collection is organized around fundamental themes associated with border and migration issues including: border identities and disputes; human trafficking; undocumented and unauthorized migration; and global governance of migration.

Where can you access the resource

Border and Migration Studies Online is available to access via SOLO. A Single-Sign-On (SSO) is required to access this database, so access is restricted to Oxford University students and staff members

 

Our Resource of the Month choice for March: BBC Monitoring

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians will choose an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

Jo Gardner sat at her desk behind a PC.

 

March’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations.

 

 

An infographic of a PC with the words 'March Resource of the Month' on a banner in front of it.

An open laptop on a desk. The words 'BBC Monitoring' are on the screen. Next to it are a pad, pencil and a cup of coffee.

Jo’s choice is BBC Monitoring. It was chosen because it covers many global regions and claims to help us make sense of world events.

The BBC Monitoring ‘Resource of the Month’ March promotion includes two Webinars, find our more below.

Overview

BBC Monitoring is a specialist service within BBC News that tracks, translates, analyses and summarises global media to help you make sense of world events. BBCM has been capturing essential media insights for governments, NGOs, academia, corporates and intergovernmental organisations since 1939. From social media to TV, digital news sources and radio, BBCM monitors the full spectrum of publicly available information.

Key Highlights

  • BBCM has 200 staff based across 12 international offices
  • Working in more than 100 languages
  • Covering around 150 countries
  • Online database with over 4 million entries dating back to 1996
  • 400 stories added every day
  • Can be customised to deliver personalised alerts and feeds
  • Key focus areas include Russia, Iran, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, China, Latin America jihadist related media and disinformation

On BBC Monitoring’s website you will find:

  • News alerts – timely reporting on major stories as they happen
  • Reports – accurate and nuanced translations and summaries of international media reporting including important speeches and statements
  • Round-ups – highlights of key stories on a particular country, region or topic
  • Insight – expert comment and analysis of trends, explaining key issues in our main specialisms
  • Reference – a full reference section with biographies, guides to international media environments and key organisations

An infographic of a pair of hands on a laptop keyboard. To the rights are examples of BBC Monitoring web pages. To the left are some headphones and social media logos, newspaper, globe and a satellite.

Where can you access the resource

A Single-Sign-On (SSO) is required to access this resource, so access is restricted to Oxford University students and staff members.This resource also requires you to register before use.

Access the resource via SOLO or directly via https://monitoring.bbc.co.uk/login

An image of what the log on area looks like on the BBC Monitoring webpage. At the top a symbol of a person with the words 'Log In' next to it. Underneath the words 'Log In' and a box to enter your email address.

 

Log in (top right) using your Oxford University email address and you will be redirected to log in with your SSO

 

 

Webinars

A person sat crossed legged on floor with a open laptop on their lap. They are looking at the screen. Next to it are the words 'Join a Webinar'

As part of our BBC Monitoring Resource of the Month promotion, BBC Monitoring staff will be hosting two Webinars. Both are free to join and will be taking place via Teams, click on the links below to join on the day:

BBC Monitoring Introductory Webinar, Tuesday 8 March 11.00-11.30am – JOINING LINK INTRODUCTION

Meet Kayleen Devlin of the BBC Disinformation Team, Wednesday 9 March, 11.00-11.30am – JOINING LINK DISINFORMATION.

Further Help

 A range of video tutorials and guides can be found in the help section of the resource  to discover how to get the most out of the BBC Monitoring website.

Newsletters

4 covers of the BBC Monitoring Newsletter.

BBC Monitoring offers a range of free newsletters brought to you by their regional experts on the stories making an impact around the world. Subscribe to weekly, fortnightly or monthly insights as well as their quarterly magazine. You can find specialist coverage on disinformation, jihadist media and the latest insight and analysis across a range of regions and countries. For more information and to sign-up click here

Events

BBC Monitoring also holds regular online expert panel discussions featuring a range of BBCM and external specialists. In the last 18 months they have covered a wide range of topics, from the global impacts of Covid-19, to Afghanistan under renewed Taliban rule or exploring what the Biden presidency means for the world.

These online events are free to attend and offer you the opportunity to submit your questions to our experts.

And there is no such thing as a missed webinar: for those unable to attend, recordings are available and can be watched in your own time.

If you would like to receive invites to BBC Monitoring events, please contact Nick Reynolds.