6th Week: Free iSkills Workshops

A photo of a laptop open with the iSkills logo on the screenBodleian iSkills workshops aim to develop your skills in information discovery and scholarly communications, covering a variety of resources across a wide range of disciplines. They are primarily aimed at University of Oxford students and staff. Some workshops take place face-to-face, whilst others are run online.

The workshops are FREE but online booking is essential. A list of the sessions taking place this term can be found on the iSkills Workshops webpage.

A cartoon image of a person's hands resting on a laptop with a woman's head and shoulder's on the screen, a cup of coffee, notebook and pens next to them on the table.

Workshops taking place in 6th Week:

iSkills: Discovering archives at the Bodleian Libraries (Tues 15th Nov 14:30-15:30)
This classroom-based session will introduce participants to the key catalogues and finding aids for post-1500 archives and manuscripts at the Bodleian Libraries. In particular the session will focus on Bodleian Archives and Manuscripts, the new online catalogue for post-1500 archives and manuscripts. The session will also briefly introduce some of the major UK online gateways for discovering archives.
Who is this session for? Postgraduates, researchers, academics and anyone interested in the topic.
Format:
 Classroom-based.

iSkills: Creating reading lists using Oxford Reading Lists Online (ORLO) for Academics, Administrators and Staff (Tues 15th Nov 15:00-16:30)
Do you want to provide reading lists with direct links to e-books and articles? Oxford Reading List Online (ORLO) is an online reading list platform which makes it easy to create reading lists with direct links to e-books, articles and other e-resources and which show real time availability for physical resources in Oxford Libraries.
Who is this session for? This is an introductory session for academics, administrators and any staff supporting reading lists. It is NOT intended for students.
Format: Online using Microsoft Teams.

Referencing: Zotero (Fri 18th Nov 9:30-12:30)
Zotero is a reference management tool that helps you build libraries of references and add citations and bibliographies to word processed documents using your chosen citation style. This classroom-based introduction covers the main features of Zotero with the opportunity for practical exercises.
Who is this session for? Students, researchers and staff needing to manage references and create bibliographies.
Format: Classroom-based.

How to access the Financial Times online for free

Info graphic of a man pointing to a tablet. On the table screen it says 'News.'

Oxford University has a subscription to the Financial Times Online, which is available to staff and students with an Oxford University email address.

The subscription includes access to subscriber-rated content and a Power Search facility that gives access to 8 years of the FT, along with 22 million articles from 500 of the world’s leading business press publications.

When accessing for the first time you must register and create an account using the instructions below.

You first need to register by visiting:

https://weblearn.ox.ac.uk/portal/site/:asuc:ulib:eresources

You will be prompted to login – select Oxford Account Login and type in your Single Sign On (SSO).  Scroll down to find the entry for Financial Times (FT.com).

Click the link to be taken to the registration page on the Financial Times website.

Because you have come via the University’s eResources passwords page, the site will recognise you as a member of the University of Oxford

Use your University of Oxford email address to register.

You will receive an email containing a link to set up a password for your account. After setting up your account, you will have access to the Financial Times Online both on and off campus.

Historical Archive

A magnifying glass next to the words 'Database, Financial Times (1888-2016) Gale (Firm) Online Access).

An historical archive of the Financial Times can be accessed via SOLO. It includes content spanning the period 1888 – 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

How to access the Economist online for free

An infographic of a person sat behind a computer screen, typing on a keyboard

Keep up to date with the latest economic, business, political and international news by reading The Economist.

This popular weekly magazine is available for free online via SOLO with your SSO (Single Sign-On). The complete content from 1843 is available to view.

Image of the Economist title as it shows on SOLO with a green circle underneath and link to Online Access

Three methods of access will display and the date ranges/content available for each one vary. We recommend using the second and third options in the list of providers.

Full-Text Reproduction of Print Version (1992 to 2022)

The 3 options for accessing the Economist on SOLO. The top option (Full text available via ABI/INFORM Global is circled in red.

Choose the 1st option (ABI/INFORM Global) to access a full-text reproduction of the print version of The Economist from 1992 to the latest issue. Note however that content may differ from the online version (2nd option ‘Economist Newspaper’)

Full-Text Plus Additional Online Content (1997 to 2022)

The 3 options for accessing the Economist on SOLO. The second option (Full text available via Economist Newspaper is circled in red.

Choose the second option (Economist Newspaper) for full text access from 1997 to the latest issue, plus access to additional online only articles.

Once you have clicked on the above link and The Economist website has displayed, it will show tabs at the top of the screen to ‘Subscribe/Log in or register’ but you do not need to do this, as you have already logged in via SOLO with you SSO. Full text access will display when you click on the image of the issue you wish to read:

An image of the website that will display when viewing the Economist online. Three cover images of the latest 3 issues are displayed

Images copyright of the Economist

Full-Text Historical Archive (1843 to 2020)

The 3 options for accessing the Economist on SOLO. The third option (Full text available to 2020 via Gale Cengage Economist Historical Archive is circled in red.
Choose the 3rd option (Gale Cengage Economist Historical Archive) to access the historical archive dating from 1843 up to and including 2020.

 

5th Week: Free Bodleian iSkills Workshops

A photo of a laptop open with the iSkills logo on the screenBodleian iSkills workshops aim to develop your skills in information discovery and scholarly communications, covering a variety of resources across a wide range of disciplines. They are primarily aimed at University of Oxford students and staff. Some workshops take place face-to-face, whilst others are run online.

The workshops are FREE but online booking is essential. A list of the sessions taking place this term can be found on the iSkills Workshops webpage.

A cartoon image of a person's hands resting on a laptop with a woman's head and shoulder's on the screen, a cup of coffee, notebook and pens next to them on the table.

Workshops taking place in 5th Week:

iSkills: Keeping up to date with research (Tues 8th Nov 10:00-11:30)
An online introduction to using alerts to keep up to date with new research and save you time. A combination of presenter-led instruction and the opportunity for participants to set up email alerts to receive notifications for publications in their field of research. We invite you to send any questions you have in advance to usered@bodleian.ox.ac.uk for the instructors to cover in the session. There will also be opportunities to ask questions in the class.
Who is this session for? Postgraduates, researchers, academics and anyone interested in the topic.

Format: Online using Microsoft Teams. 

iSkills: Working with sensitive research data in the Social Sciences and Humanities (Tues 8th Nov 14:00-16:00)
A workshop outlining some of the key principles to bear in mind when working with sensitive or restricted research; whether collected yourself or obtained from a third party source such as a data archive. Issues of confidentiality, informed consent, cybersecurity and data management will be covered. Examples of scenarios or concerns drawn from the research of participants are particularly welcome.
Who is this session for? All DPhil students and research staff in the Social Sciences and Humanities.
Format: Classroom-based.

iSkills: Getting started in Oxford Libraries (Thurs 10th Nov 14:00-16:00)
An online introduction to getting started in Oxford libraries. This workshop will feature live demonstrations and hands on activities on how to use SOLO, the University’s resource discovery tool. We will search for a range of material and show you how to get hold of what you want to read.
Who is this session for? All Oxford Library users.
Format: Online using Microsoft Teams. 

*New* Open Scholarship: Fundamentals of Open Access (Thurs 10th Nov 14:30-15:30)
Are you baffled by open, confused by embargoes? Does the mention of the colour gold or green catapult you into a realm of perplexed irritation? Come to this session, where we’ll break down open access and all its many jargon terms, confusing publishing structures and hint at the advantages you can reap by publishing open.
Who is this session for? Academic staff, administrative staff, library staff, Oxford University Hospitals staff and all other Oxford staff.
Format: Online using Microsoft Teams. 

Referencing: RefWorks (Fri 11th Nov 9:30-12:30)
RefWorks is a web based reference management tool for Windows and Macs which helps you to collect and manage references and insert them into your Word document as in-text citations or footnotes and generate bibliographies.
Who is this session for? Oxford students, researchers and other staff plus Oxford alumni.
Format: Classroom-based.

Our Resource of the Month choice for November

Each month, one of our Subject Librarians chooses an electronic resource which they feel will be of interest to you.

November’s Resource of the Month has been selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations

A red rectangle with a laptop to the left of it. On the screen and adjacent to it are the words 'November Resource of the Month.'

Jo’s choice is Project Syndicate. It was chosen because we are running a trial for this resource during November.

An open laptop on a wooden table. To the right is a coffee cup and the left is a notebook and pen. On the laptop screen it says 'Project Syndicate.'

Resource Overview

Project Syndicate produces and delivers original, high-quality commentaries from prominent political leaders, policymakers, scholars, business leaders, and civic activists from around the world. This online magazine also provides cutting-edge analysis and insight.

Where can you access the resource

Project Syndicate can be accessed via SOLO.

Our Book of the Month choice for November

The SSL ‘Book of the Month’ feature highlights a book in our collection that has been chosen by one of our Subject Consultants. This may be a recent addition to our stock or an existing item that we would like to share with you.

November’s Book of the Month was selected by Jo Gardner, Bodleian Social Science Librarian and Subject Consultant for Politics and International Relations.

 

 

Digital Technology and Democratic Theory

Edited by Lucy Bernholz et al.

Available as an eBook.

 

 

 

 

It was chosen because it brings together a range of contributors to explore how new digital technologies are reshaping our understanding of democracy and democratic theory.

Book Overview

This book looks closely at how technology is radically changing our lives as citizens and participants in democratic governments. To understand these transformations, the editors bring today contributions by scholars from multiple disciplines to wrestle with the question of how digital technologies shape, reshape and affect fundamental questions about democracy and democratic theory.

Reviews

“This volume is a timely and essential addition that will help its audience understand the affordances—but also the very real detrimental effects—of social media in society on our governing principles and institutions.”

Sarah T. Roberts, University of California

 “This diverse collection of essays addresses how to reimagine the informational diet of democracy, free speech and association, the boundaries of the demos and political exclusion. An important and engaging read!”

Beth Simone Noveck, director, The Governance Lab

“The original potential of the volume lies in promoting cross-disciplinary scholarship on questions of democracy in the digital age. Thus, for scholars and students of a variety of disciplines including media studies, social science and the humanities, as well as engineers, the volume is essential reading.”

Rahel Süß, London School of Economics and Political Science

How can I access it?

This title is available to consult as an eBook. Access it from a Bodleian Library computer or use it remotely, by logging on to SOLO with your SSO.

Image of an open book with the pages curled to form a love heartWhat would your SSL Book of the Month be? Do you have a favourite book in our collection? If so, we would love to know what it is. Add a comment below or email us.

Not sure where to study in the SSL? Find out more about our study spaces

A person stood with their finger to their chin and head slanted to one side, looking quizzical. A large question mark is in the air above them.

Not sure where to study in the SSL? We have a variety of study spaces/seating for you to choose from. We also have different volume levels assigned to our study spaces, so you can easily find a silent space or somewhere you can talk. Read on below to discover the different options and then all you have to do is decide what suits you best!

Prefer to study with your friends? Does being surrounded by other people studying help you get down to work?

Our open plan seating might be your best choice. We have two options available:

One of open plan seating areas in the Social Science Library

A large open plan seating area on the Manor Road side of the library. Floor to ceiling windows ensure lots of natural light. The desks are roomy which means you can spread out your study materials. Desks are equipped with devices to lock your laptops to and power sockets (either above or below the desks). This area of the library is designated a Silent Zone (silent study, no conversations)

The open plan seating area in the Social Science Library with partitioned seating

Our second area of open plan seating is located on the river facing side of the library. These desks are partitioned, to allow for a degree of privacy. Again, there is plenty of natural light from the windows adjacent to the seating. Desks are equipped with power sockets. This area of the library is also designated a Silent Zone (silent study, no conversations)

Is being surrounded by others distracting for you? Do you prefer a space where you can be completely on your own or with only a few people nearby?

Our study carrels, individual partitioned seating or individual study desks will be your best choice:

Two of the individual study carrels in the Social Science Library

We have ten study carrels. Two are double carrels and the rest are single. All are sound proofed, have power sockets and Wi-Fi. All have over head lighting and are equipped with desk lamps. The carrels designated for general use operate on a first-come, first served basis. See our guide to study carrel etiquette.

The individual study desks along the west side of the Social Science Library

If the study carrels are all in use, there are individual desks situated on the side of the library facing the St Cross Building, overlooking the car park. These are also helpfully removed from distractions and noise (turn right at the end of the Issue Desk and then go left past the Discussion Rooms to reach this area). Note that these desks do not have power sockets. This area of the library is designated a Silent Zone (silent study, no conversations)

photo (c) John Cairns

The alternative is the study area at the back of the library (running along from in front of the Quiet Study Room towards the Silent Study Room) this is a partitioned seating area for quiet individual study. Half of these seats have been designated a laptop free zone. We request that readers do not use a laptop or a device with an external keyboard at these seats. Tablets and other devices with silent keyboards may still be used. The seats in this area are clearly labelled. All desks in this area have power sockets. This area of the library is designated a Silent Zone (silent study, no conversations)

Looking for a space to have a discussion, give a presentation or engage in group work? Our Discussion Rooms will suit your needs.

A groups of students having a conversation in the Small Discussion Room in the Social Science Library

photo (c) John Cairns

The small room comfortably seats 8 and the larger room seats 16.  Both rooms are equipped with whiteboards and projectors. Marker pens, board rubbers and remote controls for the projectors can be borrowed from the issue desk. Power sockets are also available. Both rooms are equipped with dimmer switches, so you can choose the light level you require. These rooms can be booked in advance by academics and students for academic-related purposes. If they are not booked, please feel free to go in and use them. These 2 rooms have been designated a Discussion Zone: Discussions, presentations, group work and conversations are permitted

Do you want plenty of desk space to spread out? Do you want to be away from the main open plan study areas? Our two Study Rooms at the back of the Library will be a good choice for you.

The Quiet Study Room in the Social Science Library

Our Quiet Study Room is equipped with whiteboards and all desks have power sockets. A Manor Road Building IT printer is also located in it (for use by students attached to Departments in the Manor Road building). The room contains two electronic and one manual height-adjustable desk. Windows along the back wall provide natural light. This room has been designated a Quiet Zone where brief, low volume conversations are permitted.

The Silent Study Room in the Social Science Library

The Silent Study Room contains desks with partitioned seating and power sockets. The room contains a standing desk and an electronic height-adjustable desk. Windows on two sides provide natural light. This room has been designated a silent zone (silent study, no conversations).

The Q-Step Centre Teaching Lab in the Social Science Library

An alternative space is the Q-Step Centre Teaching Lab (located at the back of the library, on the side facing the St Cross Building). This room is used for teaching Quantitative Methods to undergraduate students from 1pm – 6.15pm every weekday of the teaching term (Weeks 1 – 8). Outside these hours the room is accessible to all readers.

Forgotten your laptop or would prefer to work on a proper computer with desk space? Our computer area or Information Skills Training Room will be a good choice.

The main computer area and Data Area in the Social Science Library

Our main computer area is equipped with 23 PCs, this includes a dedicated Data Area with PCs containing specialist software.

The Information Skills Training Room in the Social Science Library

The Information Skills Training Room offers 20 PCs, LCD projector and screen. It is occasionally booked for training sessions but if it is free, you are welcome to use it. This area is normally less busy than our main computer area. All the monitors and keyboard are housed within the desk, so lift the covers of the desks to access them. This room is equipped with a dimmer switch, so you can choose the light level you require.

Prefer to be more relaxed and sit in individual comfy chairs? Our comfortable seating area will suit your needs.

The comfy seating area in the Social Science Library

There are 6 blue comfortable chairs on the side of the library facing the St Cross Building, behind our main computer area. There is plenty of natural daylight in this area. This are is designated a Silent Zone (silent study, no conversations)

We also have a range of ergonomic furniture for you to use:

The Library has 7 height-adjustable desks (5 electronic, 2 manual) and 6 fixed height standing desks in the following locations:

Electronic Height-Adjustable Desks

Two of the height adjustable desks in the Social Science Library

 

  • 2 are behind the main computer area (also equipped with PCs)
  • 2 in the study area on the river facing side of the Library
  • 1 in the Silent Graduate Study Room

 

 

Fixed-Height Standing Desks

One of the fixed height desks in the Social Science Library

  • 3 in the study area on the river facing side of the Library
  • 1 at the end of the partitioned seating area outside the Silent Study Room
  • 1 in the quiet study area by the windows facing the St Cross Building
  • 1 in the Silent Study Room

 

Manual Height-Adjustable Desks

  • 2 in the Quiet Study Room

Ergonomic Chairs

The Library also has 10 RH Logic ergonomic chairs located around the library. Please feel free to move them to where you would like to sit (or ask staff for assistance with doing this).

Standard adjustable chairs are available in the silent and quiet Study Rooms and at desks equipped with PCs. Library staff will fetch or move these on request.

The back of a person's heads. They are in the process of putting on some headphones

Look out for signage indicating the volume level for a zone:

A speaker with a cross next to it, on a blue backgroundSilent Zone: Silent study, no conversations

Main seating areas & Silent Study Room

Information Skills Training Room & Q-Step Centre Training Lab (when not in use for teaching)

 

 A speaker with a cross next to it, on a yellow background

Quiet Zone: Brief, low volume conversations permitted.

Quiet Study Room

 

A speaker with a cross next to it, on a green background

Discussion Zone: Discussions, presentations, group work and conversations are permitted

Large Discussion Room and Small Discussion Room

 

The reasons why SSL staff are happy to re-shelve items you have used in the library

A staff member shelving a book in the SSL

Rather than returning an item you have used in the library to the shelves, SSL staff are happy to re-shelve it for you. In fact, we prefer to do so and there are benefits to us doing this:

It ensures that books are returned to their correct home on our shelves, which allows future borrowers to find them quickly.

For Library Use Only books that have been consulted in the library, we monitor their usage by taking daily statistics of those that we find on our re-shelving trolley. This then means we can see which items are frequently used and purchase extra copies, which we can make loanable. If you return these items to the shelves, we don’t know you have used them!

So to make staff and library users happy:

The row of re-shelving trolleys in the SSL

  • Check the shelfmark of the book you have used in the library and put it on the correct alphabetical re-shelving trolley.

The Library Use Only shelving trolley in the SSL

  • If the book you are consulting has a yellow Library Use Only sticker on it, place it on the ‘Library Use Only’ re-shelving trolley (the first trolley in the row)

Free Bodleian iSkills Workshops coming up in 4th Week

A photo of a laptop open with the iSkills logo on the screenBodleian iSkills workshops aim to develop your skills in information discovery and scholarly communications, covering a variety of resources across a wide range of disciplines. They are primarily aimed at University of Oxford students and staff. Some workshops take place face-to-face, whilst others are run online.

The workshops are FREE but online booking is essential. A list of the sessions taking place this term can be found on the iSkills Workshops webpage.

A cartoon image of a person's hands resting on a laptop with a woman's head and shoulder's on the screen, a cup of coffee, notebook and pens next to them on the table.

Workshops taking place in 4th Week:

iSkills: Managing research data and Data Management Planning (DMPs) (Tues 1st Nov 14:00-16:00)
Good research data management is a vital component of academic practice. Part of this is the principle that the data used to develop the arguments and outcomes of your research should be effectively stored and managed during a project, preserved for the future and – where possible – shared with other academics. This session introduces the University’s research data policy and outlines the practical impact this will have on your work.
Who is this session for? All DPhil students and research staff.
Format: Classroom-based.

Referencing: EndNote (Introduction to) (Weds 2nd Nov 14:00-16:00)
EndNote 20 is a desktop-based reference management tool for Windows and Mac users, which helps you build libraries of references and insert them into your Word document as in-text citations or footnotes and automatically generate bibliographies. This online introduction to EndNote is open to all University of Oxford students, researchers and staff and teaches you how to use the software so that you can effectively manage your references.
Who is this session for? Oxford students, researchers and other staff.
Format: Online using Microsoft Teams. 

Referencing: Choosing and using software for referencing (Fri 4 Nov 9:30-12:30)

This introductory session gives an overview of how reference management works, explores the advantages and disadvantages of a range of software packages and gives you the opportunity to try out three different packages (RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero) so that you can work out which one is best for you.

Who is this session for? Postgraduate students, researchers and university staff.

Format: Classroom-based. 

 

The SSL has a whole range of equipment you can borrow for library use: Just ask at our Issue Desk

If you’ve forgotten to bring some equipment with you, the SSL has a whole range of items available to borrow (for library use only), so it is always worth checking with us before you head back home. We have:

  • Android & Apple Charging Cables
  • Calculators
  • Headphones
  • Travel Adaptors
  • USB Mains Charger
  • USB Memory Sticks

We lend the following reading aids.

  • Book Snakes
  • Book Stands
  • Coloured Acetate Sheets
  • Desk Lamps
  • Foam Book Supports
  • Magnifiers

We lend computer equipment and peripherals:

  • Dell Mouse
  • Dell Standard Keyboard
  • Extension Lead
  • Ergonomic Keyboard
  • Laptop Locks
  • “Light-Touch” Keyboard
  • Mouse Mat

We lend whiteboard pens for use with the whiteboards in our Discussion and Study Rooms.

Want to store things securely? We loan padlocks, for use with the lockers situated behind the main building reception desk. This is the only item of our equipment that you can take out of the library and borrow for longer than a day.

 

We have a Lumie Daylight Desk Lamp you can borrow. Using this desk lamp will provide you with the bright light your body needs during the dark winter months. It can help boost your energy levels, put you in a better mood and make you feel more awake. It is particularly beneficial for those that suffer from SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder).

 

 

 

We also have a prayer mat. Staff can advise on the best area in the library to go to use it.