The 18th-century Gothick: Symposium, 7 August 2013, Oxford

A one-day symposium exploring the Gothic Revival in eighteenth-century Britain. Organized by Oliver Cox (Oxford) and Peter Lindfield (University of Kassel)
Call for papers poster [PDF]
Registration will open in July [see webpage]

This symposium corresponds with co-organiser Peter Lindfield’s tenure of the Dunscombe Colt visiting fellowship at the Bodleian Libraries Centre for the Study of the Book. Supported by the Bodleian Library, the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the Georgian Group, this fellowship will facilitate a thorough examination of Oxford’s MSS concerned with eighteenth-century Gothic Revival architecture and related historical perspectives.
Peter Lindfield
Peter Lindfield writes,

Receiving the inaugural Dunscombe Colt research fellowship for the study of eighteenth-century British architecture is a tremendous privilege. I conducted research at the University of Oxford whilst completing my PhD (Art History, University of St Andrews), so I know the quality and breadth of treasures awaiting me.

My research centres upon the artistic, architectural and historiographical manifestations of the Gothic aesthetic in Britain c.1700–1840. Co-running a symposium on the eighteenth-century Gothic Revival at Oxford ties in perfectly with the theme of my fellowship. It also capitalises upon Oxford’s place within the history of the Gothic Revival, the University’s colleges being major patrons of collegiate Gothic. The symposium also marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Georgian Group’s Gothick symposium held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. I look forward, along with my co-organiser, Oliver Cox (University College Oxford), to welcoming scholars of the eighteenth-century Gothick Revival to Oxford on the 7th August 2013.

The merry bells of England. Broadside ballad printed c. 1845 by J.Paul and Co.
The merry bells of England. Broadside ballad printed c. 1845 by J.Paul and Co. [Bodleian Library Harding B 11(2407)]

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