Error and print culture, 1500-1800: conference, 5 July 2014

Corrected proof of a plate from Richard Gough's Sepulchral monuments, folded into Bodleian Gough Warw. 22, William Dugdale's Antiquities of Warwickshire (1656)

Corrected proof of a plate from Richard Gough’s Sepulchral monuments, folded into Bodleian Gough Warw. 22, William Dugdale’s Antiquities of Warwickshire (1656)

The CSB conference ‘Error and Print Culture, 1550-1800’ convened by Adam Smyth (Oxford) welcomed delegates to Oxford for a day of contemplation of errors, posing questions both historical and philosophical: why did printed materials deviate from authorial intentions – how can we be sure that any printed line is wrong, or right? – and when does an error happen: in the printing, or in the reading or theatrical or musical performance or the peal of church bells based on a printed guide?

See abstracts of the presentations at ‘Error and Print Culture’

John Taylor's 'Errata, or faults to the Reader' rehearses the usual excuses - sickness, and a job put out to several printers - and the plea for readerly generosity.

John Taylor’s ‘Errata, or faults to the Reader’ rehearses the usual excuses – sickness, and a job put out to several printers – and the plea for readerly generosity.

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