Transformations in print

The Bodleian’s Bibliographical Press continues experimenting with techniques from the hand-press period. This transformation print  [see pictures of the original] held at Bodleian MS Wood E 25(10) is one of several from the 17th and 18th centuries containing the same general theme under the title, ‘The beginning, progress, and end of man’.  The Bodleian’s copy has the imprint, ‘Printed for J. Deacon, at the Angel in Guilt-spur Street‘.  The same images appear in an edition at Harvard with the imprint, ‘London: Printed by E. Alsop for T. Dunster, 1654‘; another version, ‘Printed by B. Alsop for T. Dunster, 1650‘, is in the Thomason collection at the British Library. Several other versions exist, and the Bodleian also holds a manuscript version from the 18th century.

At Broadside Day 2017, in the Weston Library, Jacqui Reid-Walsh will speak about ‘The beginning, progress, and end of man’ as an interactive text.

Meanwhile, Richard Lawrence at the Bodleian’s Bibliographical Press is experimenting with printing transformations using two blocks; here using reproductions in zinc based on the Bodleian’s copy. From this experiment it appears that the transformation could be achieved using two blocks, ‘Adam’ and the ‘mermaid’; one printed on the centre of the sheet, and the other printed over this on the outside, after the upper and lower edges were folded to meet in the middle. As further evidence for this hypothesis, the Bodleian’s copy shows blocks printed over the deckled edges of the paper.  We still wonder why, in these 17th-century editions at least, the title (on the outer side) and imprint (on the inner side) are interrupted by large gaps at the latitude of the join.

Thanks to Kim Vousden for graphic design to prepare the images for reproduction as printing blocks.

Collections containing over 30,000 ballads in Bodleian collections are accessible online at http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/

Register for Broadside Day 2017, to hear more about broadsides and street literature.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 99, printed in 2016

Peter Rukavina, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada, printed Sonnet 99 for the Bodleian’s appeal for Shakespeare’s sonnets printed by any means of relief printing in 2016, the 400th anniversary of the poet’s death. The images below, supplied by Peter Rukavina, indicate the process. The finished product can be seen in this animation, by Adam Koszary.  https://youtu.be/2LHpc0kFzss

Sonnet 99, Peter Rukavina, Reinvented Press, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada. Letterpress printed on a Golding Jobber No. 8 Press.

Preparation for printing part of Sonnet 99. Photo: Peter Rukavina
Preparation for printing part of Sonnet 99. Photo: Peter Rukavina
Printer's copy for Sonnet 99, printed by Peter Rukavina
Printer’s copy for Sonnet 99, printed by Peter Rukavina

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 78 to 98

This series is called, ‘Figures of delight,’ after the title given to Sonnet 98 by Ken Burnley, Silver Birch Press. NOTE – missing sonnets will be supplied in the correct place as soon as photos are made!

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 58 to 77, printed in 2016

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 37 to 56, printed in 2016

NOTE: Sonnet 38, printed by Armina Ghazarian, in Ghent, will be pictured in an update of this post.

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 19 to 36, printed in 2016

 

 

Sonnets printed in 2016 welcomed to the Bodleian Libraries

The Bodleian Libraries welcomed two unique sets of sonnets into the Libraries’ collections at a special event on 10 November, 2016.

Close up image of a letterpress printed sonnet

One was a set of sonnets written by Oxford schoolchildren as part of a series of workshops led by the Poet of Oxford Kate Clanchy. The other was a unique collection of Shakespearean sonnets that have been hand-printed by printers around the world as part of the Bodleian’s Sonnets 2016 project.

Read more of this story on the Bodleian Libraries news page….

Catriona Cannon and Miles Wigfield
Deputy Librarian Catriona Cannon thanks Miles Wigfield, President of the Oxford Guild of Printers, who presented the collection on behalf of all the sonnet printers.
Richard Lawrence examining the replica press in Blackwell Hall, Weston Library
Professor of Poetry Simon Armitage and Richard Lawrence examining the replica press in Blackwell Hall, Weston Library

Images of the sonnets received are shown in other posts on The Conveyor

Visiting Fellowships in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries

fellowships-imageThe Bodleian Libraries offer Visiting Fellowships to researchers coming to Oxford to use the Special Collections of archives, manuscripts, rare books, ephemera, maps, and music. Fellowships support a period of study in the Weston Library for Special Collections.

The call is now open for applications for 2017-18. Deadline for applications is December 5, 2016.

See the Fellowships pages for details of Fellowships offered in particular fields of study, and for How to Apply.
http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/csb/fellowships

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 1 to 18, printed in 2016

Stuarts Online and animated

A web resource for schools, Stuarts Online, featuring materials from the Bodleian and Ashmolean has launched a video narrated by David Mitchell.

The Stuarts in Seven Minutes has been produced as part of the Stuarts Online initiative. Produced by academics at the universities of Cambridge, Exeter, Nottingham and Oxford, Stuarts Online includes twenty short films – each centred on a key text or artefact – which explore the stories, conflicts and personalities central to the history of Stuart Britain. It also provides lesson plansbiographies, timelines, and other learning resources. The films are enriched by privileged access to the holdings of the Ashmolean Museum and the Bodleian Library, of the University of Oxford. Their development was supported by further partnerships with the Historical Association and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

David Mitchell recording 'Stuarts in Seven Minutes' for the Historyworks production
David Mitchell recording ‘Stuarts in Seven Minutes’ for the Historyworks production
An animated navy from 'Stuarts in Seven Minutes'
An animated navy from ‘Stuarts in Seven Minutes’