Opening Hours w/b 18th February

Our opening hours in week 6 will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to visit please do contact us by email or phone to arrange an appointment.

Have a lovely weekend!

Pharmacy leech jar, England, 1830-1870. Credit: Science Museum, London. CC BY

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology- 18th February (week 6)

Dr Koen Vermeir, CNRS, Paris/Maison Française d’Oxford
Charlatan epistemology

‘In the spring of 1697, wonder-workers cured many citizens of Rotterdam by what was called “piss-work”. Instead of attending to the patient, healers used a secret powder to treat the patient’s fresh morning urine, and through a sympathetic interaction, the patient would be cured. The charlatans did not only draw censure from established physicians but some physicians supported the new cure bringing the charlatans into the fold. I will use this case study to discuss the epistemology of the charlatan. Charlatans have caused a historiographical headache for the history of medicine. The very category of “the charlatan” has been questioned again and again because of the intrinsic dangers of projection, anachronism and inappropriate judgment that seem to be embedded in the word itself. Instead of repeating the rhetoric of imposture and credulity, historians of medicine have recently tried to discover the “real” historical charlatan behind the polemics. In order to understand the charlatan we cannot ignore the divisive rhetoric, however. Key notions such as imposture, credulity, imagination and deception have to be historicized.’

When? Monday 18th February 2019, 16:00. Coffee will be available from 15:30.

Where? Lecture Theatre, History Faculty, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL

All welcome to attend! This term’s HSMT Seminar series is convened by Professor Rob Iliffe and Dr Sloan Mahone, Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology. More information about HSMT events can be found here.

Opening Hours w/b 11th February

Our opening hours in week 5 will be:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our books relating to the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to visit please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a brilliant weekend!

Treatment of nasal polypus, 17th Century, G. M. Faenisch. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology- 11th February (week 5)

‘Throughout the eighteenth century and for much of the nineteenth, the French language was the equivalent of the English language today: it was the language of diplomacy, of national elites, of culture in general, of science and medicine in particular. During the early decades of the XIX century, two major French publishers, Charles-Louis Panckoucke (1780-1844) and Jean-Baptiste Baillière (1797-1885) entered the market of transnational and global communication, by making available translations from the German language into French. Panckoucke, the son of the publisher linked to the editorial enterprise of Diderot’s and D’Alembert’s Encyclopédie, published a Dictionnaire des sciences médicales (60 vol., 1811-1822). The work was heavily indebted to German medicine, and made him a millionaire. From the late 1820s until the late 1850s, Baillière produced multi-volume translations of German works in medicine, physics, chemistry, the history of medicine and the history of philosophy – with a marked predilection for homeopathy and macrobiotics. He opened a highly profitable shop in London, and sent members of his family to establish branches in Australia, Canada, the United States, and Spain, thus becoming the first global scientific publisher – and a very rich man.’

When? Monday 11th February 2019, 16:00. Coffee will be available from 15:30.

Where? Lecture Theatre, History Faculty, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL

All welcome to attend! This term’s HSMT Seminar series is convened by Professor Rob Iliffe and Dr Sloan Mahone, Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology. More information about HSMT events can be found here.

Opening Hours w/b 4th February

Please note that our opening hours for week 4 will be slightly different from the usual, as follows:

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Thursday: 2.15pm-4.30pm
Friday: CLOSED

Our books relating to the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to pay us a visit, please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a wonderful weekend!

‘The Kings medicines for the plague. Prescribed in the year, 1604 / by the whole Collodge of Physitians, both spiritual and temporal. Generally made use of, and approved in the years, 1625, and 1636. And now most fitting for this dangerous time of infection, to be used all England over.’ Royal College of Physicians.
London : F. Coles & T. Vere, 1665. Credit: Wellcome CollectionCC BY

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology- 4th February (week 4)

‘Even before Britain’s National Health Service opened its doors on 5th July 1948, it was the subject of considerable international commentary, both enthusiastic and appalled. By 1948, the British government, medical professional bodies, activist groups, trade unions, and members of the public were not only aware of international conversations around the NHS, but were actively intervening in them. This is most visible in relation to perceptions of the Service in the United States, where the NHS was heavily invoked in national debates over the appropriate role of the state in the provision of health care. This talk will explore the efforts of a range of actors to influence domestic and international opinions about the National Health Service from its first decade to the end of the 20th century. What can representations of the NHS tell us about the place of the Service itself as a symbol of international standing and national values?’

When? Monday 4th February 2019, 16:00. Coffee will be available from 15:30.

Where? Lecture Theatre, History Faculty, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL

All welcome to attend! This term’s HSMT Seminar series is convened by Professor Rob Iliffe and Dr Sloan Mahone, Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology. More information about HSMT events can be found here.

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology- 28th January (week 3)

Dr Roderick Bailey (University of Oxford):
Murder in Palestine? Revisiting the causes of the Acre/Akka typhoid outbreak of 1948

‘In 1948, an outbreak of typhoid occurred in the coastal town of Acre (Akka) in northern Palestine. This was a time when Jewish and Arab communities were in open conflict, and subsequent claims that Jewish militants had deliberately contaminated the town’s water supply have become part of major narratives of the period and are routinely presented as fact. Drawing on a range of records, including the contemporary reports of Red Cross delegates and British military personnel on hand to examine the conditions, this paper discusses the supposed evidence for deliberate contamination and how the episode has been presented publicly since.’

When? Monday 28th January 2019, 16:00. Coffee will be available from 15:30.

Where? Lecture Theatre, History Faculty, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL

All welcome to attend! This term’s HSMT Seminar series is convened by Professor Rob Iliffe and Dr Sloan Mahone, Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology. More information about HSMT events can be found here.

Opening Hours w/b 28th January

During Week 3 we will be open at the following times:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday: 2.15pm-5pm
Friday: 2.15pm-3.30pm

Our books relating to the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to pay us a visit, please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a good weekend!

Iron artificial arm, Europe, 1560-1600. Credit: Science Museum, London. CC BY

 

Opening Hours w/b 21st January

During Week 2 we will be open our usual hours, as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our books relating to the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to pay us a visit, please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have an excellent weekend!

State showing a person with gout, and his family. Made in Meissen, Germany. Credit: Science Museum, London. CC BY.

 

Opening Hours w/b 14th January

We’re back! Next week the Wellcome Unit Library will reopen for the start of term, and our opening hours will be:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our collections are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to pay us a visit, do contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a lovely weekend!

Advert for ‘Liebig’s Beef Wine’, prepared by S. Stephens, Chemist and Opticians, Milnsbridge, [between 1900 and 1909?]. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY