Author Archives: matkinson

Opening hours w/b 22nd April

Our opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Easter Monday: CLOSED
Tuesday
: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

The Library’s collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a wonderful Easter weekend!

Trade card recommending ‘Sir Hans Sloane’s Milk Chocolate’. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 15th April

Our opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday, Thursday & Friday: CLOSED for Easter break

We will reopen on the afternoon of Tuesday 23rd April.

The Library’s collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a fabulous weekend!

‘Wholesome Advice Against the Abuse of Hot Liquors’, by Dr. Duncan, London, 1706. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

 

Opening Hours w/b 8th April

Our opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

The Library’s collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a lovely weekend!

Bottle of extract of nux vomica, Savory and Moore Limited, London, England, 1794-1930. Credit: Science Museum, London. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 1st April

Our opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Monday: 2.15pm-5pm
Tuesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Wednesday, Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

The Library’s collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please contact us to arrange an appointment.

Have a brilliant weekend!

Exhibition of the Laughing Gas: A man breathing in nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and a man exhibiting its exhilarating effects. Wood engraving, Bristol, c. 1840. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

Opening Hours w/b 25th March

Our opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday: 2.15pm-5pm
Friday: CLOSED

The Library’s collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please contact us by email or phone.

Have a fantastic weekend!

‘Dr. James’s Powder for Fevers’: Trade card advertising Dr James’s Powder for Fevers sold by J. Newbery at the Bible and Sun, St Paul’s Church Yard. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

New Books: Sleeping Sickness, Nutrition, Ovariotomy and Influenza

These fascinating volumes are just a few of the newest additions to the library! You can view the full range on our LibraryThing page, or book an appointment and take a look at our New Books Display in person.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lomidine files: The untold story of a medical disaster in colonial Africa by Guillaume Lachenal. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017.

Proteins, pathologies and politics: dietary innovation and disease from the nineteenth century by David Gentilcore & Matthew Smith (eds.). London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018.

Belly-rippers, surgical innovation and the ovariotomy controversy by Sally Frampton.
Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

Influenza : the hundred year hunt to cure the deadliest disease in history by Jeremy Brown.
New York: Touchstone, 2018.

 

Opening Hours w/b 18th March

The Wellcome Unit Library’s opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please do contact us by email or phone.

Have a lovely weekend!

Ephemera Collection. QV: Advertising: 1850-1920. Leaflet: ‘A pathetic picture of pain and perplexity….Dr Jenner’s Liver Cure’. Uttoxeter: Alfred Parker, [1900’s?]. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 11th March

The Wellcome Unit Library’s opening hours for next week will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO, or you can view our newest acquisitions on LibraryThing! New readers are always welcome, so if you would like to visit please do contact us by email or phone.

Have an great weekend!

Dr. Richard Rock’s “Tincture for curing the teeth”. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 4th March

Our opening hours for week 8 will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm
Thursday & Friday: 2.15pm-5pm

Our collection of books on the history of medicine are available to search on SOLO. We welcome new readers, so if you would like to visit please don’t hesitate to contact us to arrange your appointment.

Have an excellent weekend!

‘Smedley’s Chillie Paste’ [Magazine insert]. Leeds: Hirst, Brooke & Hirst Ltd. [1901] Credit: Wellcome Collection. Ephemera Collection: QV: Advertising: 1850-1920. CC BY

 

 

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology- 4th March (week 8)

“René Descartes wondered if people he observed through his window are just machines in hats and coats. One type of clockwork automata in Japan, dashi karakuri, were carried during religious festivals as vessels for deities (kami). The philosophical and scientific paradigm of Descartes’ contemporaries was shaped by the clockwork mechanism. In Japan, like in Europe, humanoid and animaloid automata reflected and affected the understanding of organic life. The ancestors of contemporary robots, clockwork automata, enchanted the people in Europe and Japan during the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with their lifelike movements. Although they had common origin – the clockwork mechanism – Japanese automata, karakuri ningyō (mechanical dolls), remained a unique techno-cultural phenomenon until the modernisation at the end of the nineteenth century when most karakuri masters shifted to making telegraphs and steam locomotives. This talk presents a transnational history of clockwork automata with focus on Japan, discussing these clockwork wonders as a multifaceted historical phenomenon that shaped and was shaped by medical science, natural philosophy, spirituality, and popular culture. A transnational consideration of clockwork humanoid automata will show the heterogeneous attitudes toward organic and artificial life that emerged from the universal clockwork mechanism hidden behind cultured mechanical bodies.”

When? Monday 4th March 2019, 16:00. Coffee will be available from 15:30.

Where? Lecture Theatre, History Faculty, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL

All welcome to attend! This term’s HSMT Seminar series is convened by Professor Rob Iliffe and Dr Sloan Mahone, Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology. More information about HSMT events can be found here.