Opening Hours w/b 5th March

Weather permitting, our opening hours for next week will be as below. Stay tuned for any updates on our Twitter.

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

If you would like to visit, do send us an email!

Please note that unfortunately the computers and study table in Room 2 are unavailable due to ongoing refurbishment works. However, library users can study in the Wellcome Unit’s lovely Resource Room.

Have a warm and safe weekend!

‘Angier’s Emulsion, Lung Healer: Lady in the snow’ . [Magazine insert]. London: The.
Angier Chemical Company Ltd., [1907]. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

Opening Hours w/b 26th February

Our opening hours next week will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

If you would like to use our collections, please contact us to arrange a visit to the library.

Please note that unfortunately the computers and study table in Room 2 are unavailable due to ongoing refurbishment works. However, books are still accessible and library users can read them in the Wellcome Unit’s lovely Resource Room!

Enjoy the weekend!

‘Advert for Beaufoy & Co., 1840.’ . Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 19th February

Next week’s opening hours will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

If you would like to visit the library, please telephone or email us to arrange an appointment.

Please note that unfortunately the computers and study table in Room 2 are unavailable as we are awaiting refurbishment works. However, books are still accessible and library users can read them in the Wellcome Unit’s lovely Resource Room!

Have a good weekend!

Advertisement for Carter’s Little Liver Pills, c. 1910. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 12th February

The Library’s opening hours next week will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

Please note that our ongoing refurbishment of Library Room 2 means that the study space is still out of action and there are no Reader PCs available. However, readers are welcome to use the Unit’s excellent Resource Room to consult our books!

If you’d like to visit us, call or email to arrange an appointment.

Have a lovely weekend!

‘Love Sick. The Doctor Puzzled’. ‘A baffled doctor taking the pulse of a love-sick young woman, her maid slips a billet-doux secretly into her hand. Coloured lithograph.’ . Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

New Books: January 2018

Recent arrivals at the Wellcome Unit Library: new books on surgery, syphilis, pregnancy, medical experimentation and global medicine! To consult any of our collections, contact us to arrange your visit to the library.

Keep up with all our new books via LibraryThing: https://www.librarything.com/catalog/WelLibOxford/yourlibrary

 

 

 Lindsey Fitzharris, The butchering art : Joseph Lister’s quest to transform the grisly world of Victorian medicine (London : Allen Lane, 2017)
‘The gripping story of how Joseph Lister’s antiseptic method changed medicine forever’.
Medical schools, operating theatres, hospitals, mortuaries and graveyards provide the setting for Lindsey Fitzharris’s account of Lister’s pioneering discoveries. Fitzharris concentrates on a quarter-century of dramatic change in the practice of surgery, from 1850-1875. Lister’s work on germs and infection in this period brought together science and medicine in a world where recovery from medical operations was often a matter of luck.

Monika Pietrzak-Franger, Syphilis in victorian literature and culture : medicine, knowledge and the spectacle of Victorian invisibility (New York, NY : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2017)
Described as ‘the first large-scale interdisciplinary study of syphilis in late Victorian Britain’, Monika Pietrzak-Franger’s book explores the disease in medical, social, political and cultural contexts, reflecting on how images and discussions of syphilis played a role in constructing individual and collective identities. The study highlights the dichotomy of visibility and invisibility surrounding syphilis: as an invisible virus which could produce highly visible symptoms, a disease which was highly debated in medical circles but difficult to diagnose and treat, and a source of private shame which was publicly referenced in various mediums of literature, art and music.

Mark Jackson (ed.), A global history of medicine (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018)
This book features chapters by specialists on the history of medicine in China, the Islamic World, North and Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Western and Eastern Europe, and Australia and New Zealand, with starting and ending chapters framing the discussion. To begin, Mark Jackson discusses a challenge faced by historians of medicine: the need to take a global perspective whilst adequately considering the impact of specific local and temporal conditions. In the final chapter Sanjoy Bhattacharya takes smallpox as a case study for the way  these two dimensions should be integrated, arguing against ‘constrained global histories’ (p.257) which concentrate on powerful official health campaigns and assume worldwide trends but neglect the nuance of regional and local voices.

Jenifer Buckley, Gender, pregnancy and power in eighteenth-century literature: The Maternal Imagination (New York: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2017)
Looking at medical writings, plays, poetry, novels and popular pamphlets, Jenifer Buckley explores the trope of ‘maternal imagination’ in the eighteenth century: the belief that a pregnant woman could use their mind to influence the development of their unborn child. Beginning with the fascinating case of Mary Toft, a woman who claimed to have metamorphosed her unborn baby into a rabbit, Buckley traces the ways in which maternity was viewed as performance in this period. For authors, the idea of maternal imagination linked to debates about gender, power and the interaction between mind and body, and pregnant women became a stage on which these concerns could be addressed.

Deirdre Benia Cooper Owens, Medical bondage : race, gender, and the origins of American gynecology (Athens : The University of Georgia Press, [2017])
This new study looks at how the discoveries of nineteenth-century gynaecologists such as John Peter Mettauer, James Marion Sims and Nathan Bozeman were informed by medical experimentation on enslaved black women and Irish immigrant women. Deirdre Benia Cooper Owens tells the stories of these women using a variety of sources including medical journals, oral history interviews, newspapers and hospital records. Cooper Owens looks specifically at the destructive ‘medical fictions’ created to justify exploitation, such as the theory that enslaved black women were more resistant to pain than white women, and more broadly at the ways slavery, medicine and science were intertwined, and how American ideas about race, gender and bodies in this period influenced medical practice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opening Hours w/b 5th February

Our opening hours next week will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: CLOSED due to staff shortage, we apologise for any inconvenience caused.

If you would like to access the library, please telephone or email us to arrange an appointment.

Please note that unfortunately the computers and study table in Room 2 are still unavailable as we are awaiting refurbishment works. However, library users can read their books upstairs in the Wellcome Unit’s lovely Resource Room!

Enjoy your weekend!

‘Doctor Kill’em or Cure’em’; A quack doctor irresponsibly dispensing his potions. Coloured lithograph. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

Opening Hours w/b 29th January

Our opening hours for the coming week will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm- 5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

If you would like to consult the library’s collections, please contact us to arrange your visit.

Please note that unfortunately the study space in Library Room 2 is still out of action due to refurbishment works. However, library users can read their books upstairs in the Wellcome Unit’s lovely Resource Room!

Have a lovely weekend!

Image of a doctor in his study. ‘Andrew Boorde, The Breviary of Helthe, for all maner of syckenesses and diseases the whiche may be in man, or woman doth folowe / Expressynge the obscure termes of Greke, Araby, Latyn, and Barbary in to englysh concerning Phisicke and Chierurgye compyled by Andrewe Boord of phisicke Doctour an englysh man.’ (1547) Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

 

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology- Week 3, 29th January

This Monday’s seminar will be given by Professor Megan Vaughan (UCL), who will be speaking on ‘A research enclave in 1940s Nigeria : the Rockefeller Foundation Yellow Fever Research Institute at Yaba, Lagos, 1943-1949’.

‘This paper examines the history of yellow fever research in West Africa in the 1940s, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation.  It describes an American-led, sometimes cutting edge programme of work in the field of virology, carried out in the conditions of wartime in a British colony. The scientific ambition and sophistication of this research enclave collided with the reality of a chronically under-funded colonial infrastructure and the neglect of public health.  The paper engages with a number of debates in the history of medical research in colonial Africa, including experimentation, the construction of the “field,” and the “laboratory”, and with questions of biosecurity.’

When? Monday 29th January, 16:00. Tea and coffee will be available in the Common Room from 15.30.

Where? History Faculty Lecture Theatre, George Street, Oxford

The HSMT Seminar series is convened by Professor Rob Iliffe, Dr Sloan Mahone, Dr Erica Charters, Dr Roderick Bailey and Dr Atsuko Naono, of the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine.
All welcome to attend! For more information on this term’s seminars see the Unit’s webpage:  https://www.wuhmo.ox.ac.uk/termly-seminars

Some background reading from the Wellcome Unit Library:

Megan Vaughan, Curing their ills : colonial power and African illness (Cambridge: Polity, 1991) – R651 VAU 1991

François Delaporte, The history of yellow fever : an essay on the birth of tropical medicine (Cambridge, Mass., M.I.T. Press, 1991) – RC210 DEL 1991

Alfred Jay Bollet, Plagues & poxes : the impact of human history on epidemic disease (New York: Demos, 2002) – RA649 BOL 2004 (also available for Oxford University members as an ebook)

Hormoz Ebrahimnejad (ed.), The development of modern medicine in non-western countries: historical perspectives (London: Routledge, 2009) – R581 DEV 2009

 

 

 

 

 

Opening hours w/b 22nd January

Our opening hours for next week will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

If you would like to consult our collections, please contact us to arrange your visit.

(Please note that we are currently undergoing some decorating works and therefore the study table and computers in Library Room 2 may be unavailable on your visit. However, our books are still available, and may be read upstairs in the Unit’s lovely Resource Room!)

We wish you an excellent weekend!

‘A charlatan of the 17th century, wearing glasses and holding a snake.’ Medicine vendor selling antidotes to snake poison. Etching by G.M. Mitelli. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

 

Opening hours w/b 15th January

It’s the start of Hilary term, and the Wellcome Unit Library is open on weekday afternoons for your history of medicine reference needs! Our hours next week will be:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 2.15pm-5pm
Wednesday: 2pm-4.30pm

If you would like to consult our collections, please contact us to arrange your visit.

We wish you a lovely weekend!

Original Image: ‘Greco-Roman physician in his study, plaster cast in W.H.M.M.’ Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY