New: The Waterloo Directories of English, Irish and Scottish Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (series 3)

Oxford researchers working on Victorian periodical literature may have noticed the recent absence of our access to Waterloo Directory of English Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (Oxford researchers only).

 

I am very pleased report that access to a more updated online version (series 3) is now available to our readers via OxLIP+ and also via SOLO shortly.

Furthermore, you will now also have online access to The Waterloo Directory of Irish Newspapers and Periodicals:1800-1900 (series 3) and The Waterloo Directory of Scottish Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 (series 3).

Please note these doesn’t work well with Internet Explorer (IE).

All three resources are an alphabetical listing and description of 19th century newspaper and periodical publications in England, Scotland and Ireland covering all fields, including the arts, sciences, culture, professions, industry, finance, trades, labour, agriculture, entertainment, sports, church, women and children.

Between them, the directories include approximately 86,000 titles from 4,600 towns, lists 85,000 personal names and covers over 2,000 subjects.

As well as being an ongoing project to record the bibliographic record of Victorian periodical publications, tracking innumerable title changes for instance, it is indispensable for those studying the all-important context of periodical literature during an important historical period.

Each entry provides details of how and where the title is indexed, title changes, editor, proprietor/publisher/printer, key contributors, political and religious orientation, size, price, circulation, and frequency. It is therefore a useful resource to discover the editorial policy and political leanings of newspapers.

There is some overlap between the three directories, especially where a periodical was issued from multiple or different locations in the course of time.

The resource can be searched by title, issuing body, people, town, county, and subject as well as combine searches in advanced searching or doing a global searching.

It is currently not possible to search across all three Directories.

Also useful:

Remote access to British Library resources – more databases available

You may or may not know that the British Library offers remote access to a small selection of their electronic resources if you are a registered Reader Pass holder.

The list of those databases which are now available under this arrangement has grown.

They include the following which are not available in Oxford:

Resources available

  • British Online Archives all collections including:
    • BBC Handbooks and Listener Research
    • Colonial and Missionary records
    • Communist Party of Great Britain
    • Political History
  • The following Readex collections:
    • African American Newspapers Series 1, 1827-1998
    • Caribbean Newspapers 1718-1876
    • Early American Newspapers, Series 1
    • Foreign Broadcast Information Service 1974-1996 [selections of FBIS are already in Oxford, check SOLO / OxLIP+]
    • World newspaper Archive: African Newspapers, 1800-1922

If you don’t have a reader pass, then check if / how you can register with the BL.

Also useful: Other electronic resources available in the BL which are not in Oxford.

Trial until 22 July: Rand Daily Mail (1902-1985)

Colleagues have organised a trial of the Rand Daily Mail (1902-1985), an important South African newspaper. It is available via SOLO and OxLIP+ for Oxford students and researchers.Rand Daily Mail - screenshot

The Readex digital edition of the Rand Daily Mail (1902-1985) provides researchers and students with access to a comprehensive run of this influential African news source. Published daily in Johannesburg, the Rand Daily Mail, pioneered popular journalism in South Africa and is renowned today for being the first newspaper to openly oppose apartheid and contribute to its downfall. It offers a wealth of unique perspectives not only on South Africa but also for the African continent as a whole.

Examples of stories covered include:

  • Benjamin Pogrund’s extraordinary coverage of the Sharpeville massacre in 1960;
  • Helen Zille’s uncovering of Steve Biko’’s murder at the hands of police in 1976;
  • news-breaking reporting by Mervyn Rees and Chris Day about the apartheid state’s effort to influence opinion
  • an exposé that sparked the scandal known as “Muldergate”; and many others.

Have your say

Feedback should be sent to sarah.rhodes@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. The trial ends on 22 July.

Please note, as with most trials, there is no guarantee that access can continue. In the first instance, we organise them to gauge interest and hear your views on content and functionality.

Trial until 31 May: Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000

It’s time for another trial!

Telegraph - logoTogether with a colleague in the Social Science Library, we have set up a trial to The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000.

It is a fully searchable digital archive of what was once the world’’s largest selling newspaper. Researchers and students can full text search across 1 million pages of the newspaper’s’ backfile from its first issue to the end of 2000, including issues of the Sunday Telegraph from 1961.

The newspaper was directed at a wealthy, educated readership and is commonly associated with traditional Toryism, despite its more ‘liberal’ beginnings especially in regard to foreign policy. Under the editorship of poet and Orientalist Edwin Arnold (from 1873 to 1899), the paper published widely on foreign affairs and foreign cultures. This led to The Telegraph’s coverage of Henry Morton Stanley’s expedition to Africa in search of David Livingstone, which it co-sponsored with the New York Herald.

Daily Telegraph notable highlights include:

The Kaiser Wilhelm affair: On 28 October 1908, the Daily Telegraph published an infamous interview with Kaiser Wilhelm, the German chancellor who alienated the British public with such uncensored comments as ‘you English are mad, mad, mad as march hares.’

Telegraph trial - Kaiser Wilhelm snippet 28 Oct 1908

“The German Emperor and England”, Daily Telegraph, Wed. 28 Oct. 1908, Issue 16694, p.11

The cryptic crossword puzzle: the crossword was circulated to recruit Allied codebreakers during the Second World War and was published in The Telegraph on January 13, 1942.

Feedback should be sent to jo.gardner@bodleian.ox.ac.uk or isabel.holowaty@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. The trial ends on 31 May 2016.

Related links:

New: Japan Times Archives Online (1897-2014) & Chinese Newspaper Collection Archive (1832-1953)

I am pleased to report that after a successful trial last year, the following historical newspapers from the Far East are now available to historians:

 

Japan Times Archive - screenshot of articleThe Japan Times Archives Online (1897-2014) 

From its inception in 1897 (Meiji 30), The Japan Times has been Japan’s most widely read English-language daily newspaper, providing very wide coverage of world and domestic news, business and politics.

 

 

 

ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Chinese Newspapers Collection

Coverage: 1903 – 1953Chinese Newspapers Collection - screenshot of article

This collection of 12 English-language Chinese historical newspapers gives an insight to Chinese political and social life from 1832 to 1953. In addition to the article content, the full-image newspapers offer searchable access to advertisements, editorials, cartoons, and classified ads. The collection includes major newspapers from Peking, Shanghai and Canton as well as the important missionary publications Chinese Repository and Chinese Recorder.

… “renowned for its authoritative and influential reporting on Hong Kong, China and all of Asia. Founded in 1903 by Alfred Cunningham and Tse Tsan-tai, a key figure in the Chinese revolt against the last imperial Qing Dynasty at the turn of the 20th century, the newspaper became a platform for advocating the reform movement in China. It is highly regarded by researchers because of the unique history of Hong Kong as well as the newspaper’s editorial perspective on Imperial Japan and Communist China.”

These databases are listed on SOLO and OxLIP+. Researchers and students of Oxford University also have remote access, using SSO as usual.

Related links

More news on historical newspapers

New: Nashriyah: digital Iranian history

If you are interested in modern Iranian history, then you will be pleased to know that Nashriyah: digital Iranian history has been added to SOLO and OxLIP+ but is also freely available at http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/about/projects/nashriyah-digital-iranian-history/.

Iranian-history-digitisation-MUP-screenshot

This project, led by the University of Manchester Library, provides digital versions of Iranian newspapers and periodicals many of which have previously been difficult to access. The provision of this collection supports the work of students and researchers interested in modern and contemporary Iranian history by enabling them to explore key events as they happened.

The collection’s main coverage is:

  • the premiership of Mohammad Mossadegh and the August 1953 coup d’état against his government (1950-53),
  • the 1979 Revolution
  • the late 1990s/early 2000s ‘reform era’ of former President Mohammad Khatami.

Containing more than 12,000 pages, the collection is freely accessible without restriction.

What is included in the collection?

There are currently 23 rare newspapers and periodicals (over 12,000 pages) available digitally, documenting real-life news from the 1953 coup against Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh, the 1979 revolution and the late 1990s/early 2000s ‘reform era’ of President Mohammad Khatami.

The following publications are included:

  • Ayandegan (165 issues)
  • Khank Va Khun (46 issues)
  • Rastakhiz (150 issues)
  • Tehran Mosava (2 volumes)
  • Kayhan (10 volumes)

Trial until 19th February: African American Newspapers 1827-1998

The Vere Harmsworth Library has organised a trial to Readex’s African American Newspapers series I and II. The trial ends 19th February.

This resource covers 1827-1998, and provides online access to approximately 330 U.S. newspapers chronicling a century and a half of the African American experience. The collections include historically significant papers from more than 35 states, and many rare 19th-century titles.

We trialled series I in July 2013. Series II, which has just been released, adds a further 75 titles to the first collection.

Access is available via OxLIP+ until 19th February 2016 (University members can use single sign-on for remote access).

Please send feedback about the trial to jane.rawson@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Also useful:

Check out the rest of the History eResources Desiderata and Trials.

Trials: Chinese Newspapers Collection & South China Morning Post (1903-1996) & Japan Times Archives Online (1897-2014)

Historians for the Far East will be interested in the following trials run by colleagues:

Chinese Newspapers Collection - screenshot of articleProQuest Historical Newspapers: Chinese Newspapers Collection (trial until 15 December 2015)

Coverage: 1832 – 1953

Included are critical perspectives on the ending of more than 2,000 years of imperial rule in China, the Taiping Rebellion, the Opium Wars with Great Britain, the Boxer Rebellion and the events leading up to the 1911 Xinhai Revolution, and the subsequent founding of the Republic of China. In addition to the article content, the full-image newspapers offer searchable access to advertisements, editorials, cartoons, and classified ads that illuminate history. Includes The Chinese Recorder and Missionary Journal (1868-1912), The Chinese Repository (1832-1851) and The North – China Herald and Supreme Court & Consular Gazette (1870-1941).

Please send feedback about the trial to joshua.seufert@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

South China Morning Post - screenshot of articleProQuest Historical Newspapers: South China Morning Post (trial until 15 December 2015)

Coverage: 1903 – 1996

… “renowned for its authoritative and influential reporting on Hong Kong, China and all of Asia. Founded in 1903 by Alfred Cunningham and Tse Tsan-tai, a key figure in the Chinese revolt against the last imperial Qing Dynasty at the turn of the 20th century, the newspaper became a platform for advocating the reform movement in China. It is highly regarded by researchers because of the unique history of Hong Kong as well as the newspaper’s editorial perspective on Imperial Japan and Communist China.”

http://www.proquest.com/about/news/2014/ProQuest-Unlocks-Archives-of-South-China-Morning-Post-for-Researchers.html (accessed 13 Nov 2015)

Please send feedback about the trial to joshua.seufert@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Japan Times Archive - screenshot of articleThe Japan Times Archives Online (1897-2014) (trial until 10 January 2016)

From its inception in 1897 (Meiji 30), The Japan Times has been Japan’s most widely read English-language daily newspaper, providing very wide coverage of world and domestic news, business and politics.

Please send feedback about the trial to izumi.tytler@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th-21st centuries – Tuesday 26 May 14.00-15.30

iskills newspapers[re-blogged from Bodleian iSkills blog]

Using newspapers in your research

Newspapers are wonderful resources for both historical and contemporary research not only providing a record of events, politics, the law and international affairs but also rich information about the zeitgeist of the age, social and cultural life, language and much more.

However, newspapers can be tricky to use in research. Tracking down papers can be difficult not least because historical newspapers are spread across a range of digital resources whilst in the modern age the huge scale of the resources available and the plethora of editions can make research tricky.    Mastering the appropriate resources in order to search them effectively and to make the most of the items you find can also be a challenge.

To develop your skills in using newspapers in research, why not come to the Bodleian Libraries’ iSkills session Newspapers and other online news sources from the 17th-21st centuries on Tuesday 26 May 14.00-15.30. During the session we will look at a wide range of resources for both historical and contemporary research and how to make best use of them.  > Find out more about this course and book a place.

New: BelgicaPress – digitised Belgium newspapers 1831-1950

BelgicaPress - screenshot - sample newspaperOn 24 April, the Koninklijke Bibliotheek België (Bibliothèque royale de Belgique, Royal Library of Belgium) launched BelgicaPress, an online resource providing access to nine digitised historical Belgium newspapers. Over 4 million pages have been digitised. They cover 1831 to 1950 for the following newspapers:

L’Echo De La Presse, Gazet Van Brussel, Het Handelsblad, L’Indépendance Belge (printed in Britain), Le Messager De Gand, De Nieuwe Gids, De Nieuwe Standaard and Het Nieuws Van Den Dag.

However, only content before 1919 is freely accessible over the internet. That is still an amazing 1.2 million pages and particularly good news for 19th century and World War I historians.

How do you spot free content? In your search results list, look out for:BelgicaPress - screenshot - online availableContent after 1919 can only be consulted in the Koninklijke Bibliotheek België itself. And how do you spot those? In your search results list, look out for:

BelgicaPress - screenshot - available in KB onlyThanks to OCR, the content is full-text searchable. However, I have found it somewhat temperamental. For instance, Hitler also retrieves bitter and Ritter.

Once you have an image on the screen, you can zoom in really well and you can pick up a permalink. I particularly like the ability to select a section which then automatically gets enlarged. A nice touch.

A useful search guide is available online.

Despite a few niggles, this resource should be hugely welcomed by researchers and the Koninklijke Bibliotheek België should be praised for its work.

As it’s so useful, it is now also listed in OxLIP+ and SOLO.

Related resources: